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Re: [FS32NGModelrail] Digest Number 83

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  • Kevin Crosado
    on 28/06/00 2:30 am, FS32NGModelrail@egroups.com at ... These boiler books aren t unique to Denmark. We had similar registers in New Zealand, as did the
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 29, 2000
      on 28/06/00 2:30 am, FS32NGModelrail@egroups.com at
      FS32NGModelrail@egroups.com wrote:

      > Message: 2
      > Date: Tue, 27 Jun 2000 11:48:04 +0200
      > From: Claus Nielsen <clni@...>
      > Subject: Archives, info, photos on industrial NG
      >
      > With that in mind I can actually see, that we danes have been much more
      > fortunate. This thanks to three or four very dedicated old men (two of them
      > actually with a history on the foot plates on industrial steam locos) who
      > gathered info and photos on contractors engines already in the early
      > fifties. Also 'boiler books' (after danish 'kedel bog' a book that follows
      > the boiler, which indicates dates of maintenance, inspection etc.) has been
      > collected by these men and are kept as reference material.
      >
      > The 'boiler books' was the way the danish administration (already well
      > developed (meaning 'large and cumbersome'!) in the 19th century) kept score
      > on the number and condition on the potentially quite dangerous boilers. This
      > means, that almost every contractors loco that did service in Denmark is
      > known - even with photos from most construction projects the locos did
      > service on! Of course there are still plenty of 'problems' to sort out, but
      > we have a very fine starting point.

      These boiler books aren't unique to Denmark. We had similar registers in New
      Zealand, as did the Tasmanians and, presumably, the other Australian states.
      The NZ registers are in our National Archives. What's always intrigued me is
      that NZ and Tasmania were both British colonies when they set up their
      systems and presumably took their lead from the motherland. Yet I've never
      seen any reference to similar registers in British railway publications. Did
      the British colonial administrators tell us colonials to "do as I say, not
      as I do" or are there boiler records lurking in the PRO waiting to be
      discovered? The NZ boiler inspection records were maintained by the former
      Marine Department, which doesn't seem the most obvious place to look for
      locomotive information at first. But then the same department also inspected
      cranes and building lifts (aka elevators)!
    • Paul Napier
      Kevin can you please Email me direct as I don t have your email address and don t want to inflict this chat group with the scans we discussed.
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 30, 2000
        Kevin can you please Email me direct as I don't have your email address and
        don't want to inflict this chat group with the scans we discussed.

        bandm@...

        Thanks

        Paul
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