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Re: [FS32NGModelrail] Curve radius

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  • bilwil@webtv.net
    Easily! My Wazoo Island Rwy. uses 10 radius curves, and the Bachmann Porter mechs. plus 4-wheel cars have NO problems with them at all. As I recall, Charley
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 10, 2000
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      Easily!

      My Wazoo Island Rwy. uses 10" radius
      curves, and the Bachmann Porter mechs.
      plus 4-wheel cars have NO problems with
      them at all. As I recall, Charley Lix (Hi Charley!) uses 9" radius
      curves on his
      Excelsior Estate Rwy. (1/32 branch) He
      als has no complaints. Go fer it!

      Wazoo Bill
    • Roy C. Link
      If you use Robert Hudson pattern semi-portable steel sleepered trackwork the smallest radius (type 1) was 13feet 3inches. Note that the radius was measured
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 10, 2000
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        If you use Robert Hudson pattern 'semi-portable' steel sleepered
        trackwork the smallest radius (type 1) was 13feet 3inches. Note that
        the radius was measured to the inside face of the outer rail. Type 2
        radius was 37 feet. I run a 7mm scale Ruston 'LBT' and train of six
        RUGGAs round scale 13ft 3in curves without problems.

        Scale drawings and templates etc (for 7mm scale) for Type 1 & 2 track
        and turnouts are in the RCL Product Handbook.

        Hudson 'Rugga' pattern skips will easily run on type 1 curves as they
        are properly designed so to do, having nearly perfect semi-circular
        ends. Provided your locos have the same overall length (or nearly so)
        as the rolling stock, plus a similar wheelbase, then a train is easily
        hauled or propelled around the sharpest of curves. As soon as you
        deviate from this simple formulae, problems escalate.

        Most steam locomotives (though not all) have unequal overhang of the
        fixed wheelbase, usually to accomodate the firebox. This means the
        swing outward, on curved track is greater at one end than the other,
        causing buffing/coupling problems especially when the wheelbase of the
        wagons is notably different to the loco. My first 'Crowsnest Tramway'
        in 1/4in scale has a model of 'Excelsior' - an 0-4-2 that gave endless
        problems with regard coupling at the pony truck end as the swing
        outward was too great. The only possible solution is to allow the rear
        coupler pocket to swing - not always possible.

        Basically, choose your locos and stock very carefully if you want to
        use sharp radius curves. Even Robert Hudson, who made the track,
        stated their (Hunslet built) diesels locos were suited to a minimum
        radius of 25ft and the ex - Kerr Stuart 'Wren' class steam loco, 35
        feet.

        Firms that provided equipment for building full size narrow gauge
        railways worked out all of this for their customers and tried their
        best to get it right. Modellers seem to adopt a more haphazard
        approach (as do preserved railways) in gathering up motley collections
        of ill matched stock. There are very good reasons why you don't (or
        shouldn't) haul skips with a Beyer Garratt. They might be tha same
        gauge but are not designed for with compatibility whatosover.

        Roy C Link
      • Charley Lix
        Fellows , ... our industrial narrow gauge ... 0-4-0IST steam loco ... Adding my Tuppence ... I was using 9 inch radius for a 0n2 Roundy roundy Railway and
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 10, 2000
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          Fellows ,



          >From: Mario Bernkopf <mario.bernkopf@...>

          >12 inch radius equals 10 meters in 1:1, which is an acceptable radius for
          our industrial narrow gauge
          >on the continent. I even heard rumours of twenty-feet radius on some lines.



          >> Tim Stolle wrote:

          >> >if I can use 12 inch radius curves as my smallest radius.



          >> Mike South

          >> In On3 Gauge (3/4") I can comfortably get a 1/32 scale Bagnall #300
          0-4-0IST steam loco
          >> (with 2' 9" wheelbase and 1' 3' diameter wheels) to run round 9" radius curves


          Adding my Tuppence ... I was using 9 inch radius for a "0n2'" Roundy roundy
          Railway and had made four little flats with lead deck scribed to represent
          wood with Grandt's spoke wheels , these four I could "PUSH" around the nine
          inch curves without fail hour after hour .. I've since built one for the
          1:32 nd Railway as a prototype .



          >> those fine folks on the Excelsior Estate and up the Wazoo :-) :-)

          Ah yes , those crazies over both sides of the straight .But the've been
          known to bend the rails then "See" if the Lokeys will go round .. The domo
          over to Excelsior says that 9" is his minimum .. having 'spearminted " with
          curves .. 8 inch radius seems too tight . and nine ....just fine ..



          Have Fun - Charley

          Estate Railway staff.
        • Charley Lix
          Fellows , Radius . the 9 inch raduis curves are 48 scale feet across ..seems quite generous .. The little prototype two footer over in Nevada county runs a
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 10, 2000
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            Fellows ,

            Radius . the 9 inch raduis curves are 48 scale feet across ..seems quite
            generous .. The little prototype two footer over in Nevada county runs a
            twelve ton Plymouth around a 35 foot radius curve .. regularly ...flange
            oilers are installed on the Lokey .



            >I run a 7mm scale Ruston 'LBT' and train of six
            >RUGGAs round scale 13ft 3in curves without problems.

            Have Fun - Charley

            Estate Railway staff.
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