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Starved of funds, lines decaying, Jal Sansthan pipes ‘dirty water’ to Old City

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  • Shaji John K
    Starved of funds, lines decaying, Jal Sansthan pipes `dirty water to Old City Deepak Pandey Lucknow, January 22: With the marriage season and Muharram on, and
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 23, 2007
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      Starved of funds, lines decaying, Jal Sansthan pipes `dirty water' to
      Old City
      Deepak Pandey

      Lucknow, January 22: With the marriage season and Muharram on, and
      Republic Day round the corner, the residents of Old City say minimal
      water supply is making life a daily grind, even in the winter chill.
      Locals say they are forced to consume contaminated water, as the
      Lucknow Jal Sansthan fails to check leakages and corrosion of pipelines.

      The pipelines, though, are a different story altogether. Jal Sansthan
      officials say most of the city's water pipeline network is a British
      legacy, more than a hundred years old; though experts say they ideally
      ought to be replaced every 30 or 40 years. And the gravity of the
      situation came to light recently when water supply in the entire Old
      City remained disrupted for four days after the main pipeline near
      Rakabganj bridge came apart earlier this month.


      Jal Sansthan officials, however, pass the buck on to the state
      government for not improving the situation. "They (government) seem
      least interested in tackling the issue (water supply)," a senior
      official said. "And we don't have enough funds to bring forth any
      significant change."

      According to Jal Sansthan secretary Raghuvendra Kumar, the Sansthan
      had in 2004 sent an ambitious plan worth Rs 102.60 crore to the state
      government, which, if implemented, would change the city's water
      supply network. Kumar said renovation of Aishbagh water works and
      installation of new raw water pumping plants and transformers were
      part of the plan. But, he added, the Sansthan has received only Rs 33
      crore till date — "we can only send the proposals; the rest is up to
      them (government)."

      He said another proposal for replacement of old pipelines, re-boring
      and installing tubewells, was sent recently, but to no avail as yet.
      "None pays any attention till things are working," he reasoned, when
      asked why the pipelines have not been replaced yet.

      According to officials, the Sansthan possesses little in way of
      infrastructure to meet any emergency: it has only 19 water tankers to
      cater to more than 2 million people.

      About the piquant situation in the Old City, a Jal Sansthan official
      said while on one hand the area is the biggest casualty in the present
      scenario, the thickly populated area's water consumption, on the other
      hand, is the highest. "But many residents there are not ready to pay
      water taxes," the official said. "Local politicians, too, cover up
      such issues."

      The locals, meanwhile, are left in the lurch as the Jal Sansthan
      passes the onus to the government. "The daily water supply is now
      restricted to merely half-an-hour," said Asif, a resident of
      Thakurganj, "and it's not safe to drink. We have to rely on a single
      hand pump in the area to collect drinking water."

      A recent LJS survey has found that Old City areas like Rakabganj,
      Aminabad, Daliganj and Aishbagh are more prone to leakages and
      contaminated water. Officials said old pipelines and illegal
      connections are the prime culprits for this. "We are sending a fresh
      proposal to the government for maintenance and replacement of
      pipelines," the LJS secretary said.

      Kumar said the Jal Sansthan would also prepare a list of defaulters
      who have not paid water taxes and will subsequently send them legal
      notices.
    • Shaji John K
      Starved of funds, lines decaying, Jal Sansthan pipes `dirty water to Old City Deepak Pandey Lucknow, January 22: With the marriage season and Muharram on, and
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 23, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Starved of funds, lines decaying, Jal Sansthan pipes `dirty water' to
        Old City
        Deepak Pandey

        Lucknow, January 22: With the marriage season and Muharram on, and
        Republic Day round the corner, the residents of Old City say minimal
        water supply is making life a daily grind, even in the winter chill.
        Locals say they are forced to consume contaminated water, as the
        Lucknow Jal Sansthan fails to check leakages and corrosion of pipelines.

        The pipelines, though, are a different story altogether. Jal Sansthan
        officials say most of the city's water pipeline network is a British
        legacy, more than a hundred years old; though experts say they ideally
        ought to be replaced every 30 or 40 years. And the gravity of the
        situation came to light recently when water supply in the entire Old
        City remained disrupted for four days after the main pipeline near
        Rakabganj bridge came apart earlier this month.

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        Jal Sansthan officials, however, pass the buck on to the state
        government for not improving the situation. "They (government) seem
        least interested in tackling the issue (water supply)," a senior
        official said. "And we don't have enough funds to bring forth any
        significant change."

        According to Jal Sansthan secretary Raghuvendra Kumar, the Sansthan
        had in 2004 sent an ambitious plan worth Rs 102.60 crore to the state
        government, which, if implemented, would change the city's water
        supply network. Kumar said renovation of Aishbagh water works and
        installation of new raw water pumping plants and transformers were
        part of the plan. But, he added, the Sansthan has received only Rs 33
        crore till date — "we can only send the proposals; the rest is up to
        them (government)."

        He said another proposal for replacement of old pipelines, re-boring
        and installing tubewells, was sent recently, but to no avail as yet.
        "None pays any attention till things are working," he reasoned, when
        asked why the pipelines have not been replaced yet.

        According to officials, the Sansthan possesses little in way of
        infrastructure to meet any emergency: it has only 19 water tankers to
        cater to more than 2 million people.

        About the piquant situation in the Old City, a Jal Sansthan official
        said while on one hand the area is the biggest casualty in the present
        scenario, the thickly populated area's water consumption, on the other
        hand, is the highest. "But many residents there are not ready to pay
        water taxes," the official said. "Local politicians, too, cover up
        such issues."

        The locals, meanwhile, are left in the lurch as the Jal Sansthan
        passes the onus to the government. "The daily water supply is now
        restricted to merely half-an-hour," said Asif, a resident of
        Thakurganj, "and it's not safe to drink. We have to rely on a single
        hand pump in the area to collect drinking water."

        A recent LJS survey has found that Old City areas like Rakabganj,
        Aminabad, Daliganj and Aishbagh are more prone to leakages and
        contaminated water. Officials said old pipelines and illegal
        connections are the prime culprits for this. "We are sending a fresh
        proposal to the government for maintenance and replacement of
        pipelines," the LJS secretary said.

        Kumar said the Jal Sansthan would also prepare a list of defaulters
        who have not paid water taxes and will subsequently send them legal
        notices.
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