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Re: FAA Airworthiness labels

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  • Chuck Scrivner
    ... speeds ... ************************************ Well, of course. That does make sense. But, again, we are dealing with the FAA. They don t care if it
    Message 1 of 37 , Feb 1, 2006
      "dflyingmoose_99" <dflyinmoose@h...> wrote:
      >>
      > Chuck, are you/me/we missing something here?
      >
      > I'm thinking that no experimental aircraft could/should have the
      > green, yellow, white arcs, until it is actually flown...AFTER the
      > DAR has inspected the aircraft and it's legal to fly it.
      >
      > You get the aw cert, then you fly it, find out what the stall
      speeds
      > are, then mark them, if you want to??? Yeah, you probably know what
      > the Vne (red tick), and Va (yellow arc) is if it was built from a
      > kit. But that's about it, ain't it?
      >
      > For the one of a kinder planes such as the red ryder wagon with
      > 2X4's for wings...no marks at all on the asi. Right?
      >
      > -moose
      ************************************
      Well, of course. That does make sense. But, again, we are dealing
      with the FAA. They don't care if it actually will fly,...only that
      is appropriatley registered, airworthied and placarded.

      If you have an ASI on the panal, it needs to be marked with the above
      speeds.......not that those markings actually ARE those speeds.
      Chuck
    • Gary Orpe
      - -----Original Message----- - From: FLY-UL@yahoogroups.com [mailto:FLY-UL@yahoogroups.com] - On Behalf Of Chuck Scrivner - Sent: Wednesday, February 01,
      Message 37 of 37 , Feb 1, 2006
        -> -----Original Message-----
        -> From: FLY-UL@yahoogroups.com [mailto:FLY-UL@yahoogroups.com]
        -> On Behalf Of Chuck Scrivner
        -> Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2006 1:19 AM
        -> To: FLY-UL@yahoogroups.com
        -> Subject: UL: Re: FAA Airworthiness labels
        ->
        ->
        -> "dflyingmoose_99" <dflyinmoose@h...> wrote:
        -> >>
        -> > Chuck, are you/me/we missing something here?
        -> >
        -> > I'm thinking that no experimental aircraft could/should have
        the
        -> > green, yellow, white arcs, until it is actually flown...AFTER
        the
        -> > DAR has inspected the aircraft and it's legal to fly it.
        -> >
        -> > You get the aw cert, then you fly it, find out what the stall
        -> speeds
        -> > are, then mark them, if you want to??? Yeah, you probably know
        what
        -> > the Vne (red tick), and Va (yellow arc) is if it was built from
        a
        -> > kit. But that's about it, ain't it?
        -> >
        -> > For the one of a kinder planes such as the red ryder wagon with
        -> > 2X4's for wings...no marks at all on the asi. Right?
        -> >
        -> > -moose
        -> ************************************
        -> Well, of course. That does make sense. But, again, we are
        dealing
        -> with the FAA. They don't care if it actually will fly,...only
        that
        -> is appropriatley registered, airworthied and placarded.
        ->
        -> If you have an ASI on the panal, it needs to be marked with
        -> the above
        -> speeds.......not that those markings actually ARE those speeds.
        -> Chuck
        ->
        **************
        But are official only after phase I completion.
        I spent a long time carefully marking mine during assembly time just
        to find out I had to change it all anyway. One was they were
        misinformed about the actual speeds as built (to their specs)
        offered and the incorrectness of the airspeed indicator itself. The
        gauge was up to 2 miles an hour off but the factory was better than
        10 mph.
        It was agreed, however that VNE was better than they had specified.
        Don Price had flutter tested the plane to above 100 mph. They then
        compute go with 84% of that for the final= 84.

        So what overall I am saying here is, it does matter that these
        devices not only be checked but marked properly as well so even
        exact models can be safely flown with the indicators it uses. I
        consider Va, Vso and Vne to be the most important. Once stall is
        known, in airspeed, the next can be roughly calculated in your head
        by multiplying Vso by 1.2 for Vx and 1.3 for Vy. (another
        joke/mistake in the book) Well it was a 2000 plane with a 1984 book
        that read good as a UL but they have made many changes over time
        that the book never reflected.

        A for instance, my first flight/solo was great got up to 2500 ft in
        no time. Leveled off their and came to a approach stall. Spec says
        29 mph. indicator says 40 mph. I do this several more times since I
        have to land the dang thing and the manual says *41* is proper
        approach speed. Well not today. I figured it should be around 48-50
        approach and it has been that way ever since. I will contend that
        MCA is right at 41 mph by the indicated gauge, tested against a
        calibrated one and within 1 mph at all speeds. The gauge it came
        with was quite inaccurate above 50 mph as much as 12 mph.

        Just reminded me how close we can come to being in trouble with what
        they give us if we don't check it out in a phase one style checkout
        procedure and then mark it.
        ***************
        Gary O.
        The dumb and aging one...
        661 746-4780 fax
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~>
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