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Re: [FJGRailroad] Digest Number 1083

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  • Askerberg
    ... I missed the original reference to this question, but we used gee for right turn and haw for left turn and, of course, giddyap and whoa . I could
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 3, 2003
      > >From: Frank Pierson <fpierson@...>
      > >Reply-To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
      > >To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
      > >Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Origin of Hojack (Was: RW&O)
      > >Date: Wed, 01 Jan 2003 06:09:04 -0500
      > >
      > >I hate to stir the pot on this, but I know how history tends to change
      > >the facts a bit. Many team drivers of both horses and asses trained
      > >there teams to respond to verbal commands so they could do other things
      > >while working. HI was the common command for left and HO was used to
      > >tell the team to go right. A clicking of the tongue was a common move to
      > >start the team and of course everyone knows the WHOA command to stop.
      > >We commonly tied off the reins to the front of the wagon while loading
      > >hay and used voice commands to drive the team. The last I drove was as
      > >a teenager, Many moons ago!
      > >
      > > So how do we determine the fact from the fiction?
      > >
      > >Frank Pierson
      > >
      > >


      I missed the original reference to this question, but we used "gee" for
      right turn and "haw" for left turn and, of course, "giddyap" and "whoa". I
      could not find any dictionary references for hi and ho referring to 'left'
      and 'right', only 'hey' or 'hello' and whoa, respectively. I'd be
      interested to know whether this was a NYS colloquialism - just curious, and
      I apologize for the off-topic comment.

      Al Askerberg
    • paul larner
      Just today in researching some old newspaper accounts I found the word Ho used in a manner which would otherwise mean Hooray for ... Date ofteh article in
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 3, 2003
        Just today in researching some old newspaper accounts I found the word "Ho"
        used in a manner which would otherwise mean "Hooray for ..." Date ofteh
        article in 1900.

        My thinking is the term originated on the Lake Ontario Shore Railroad and
        was then carried to the rest of the system, but that's just an idea.
        The mule story is just too cute and the one bout the greeting sounds a
        little stretched to become a nickname for an widespread railroad system.

        Could the term possibly have originated among the stock and bond traders?
        Or in some communication at the state legislature or railroad board? Or
        somehow emerging when the NYC was asquiring the stock of the rr? May I
        offer that the origin is broader, more generic, applying to the entire
        railroad than arising from some very local incident or occasion?

        PKL






        >From: Askerberg <aberg@...>
        >Reply-To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
        >To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Digest Number 1083
        >Date: Fri, 03 Jan 2003 13:30:10 -0500
        >
        >
        > > >From: Frank Pierson <fpierson@...>
        > > >Reply-To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
        > > >To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
        > > >Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Origin of Hojack (Was: RW&O)
        > > >Date: Wed, 01 Jan 2003 06:09:04 -0500
        > > >
        > > >I hate to stir the pot on this, but I know how history tends to change
        > > >the facts a bit. Many team drivers of both horses and asses trained
        > > >there teams to respond to verbal commands so they could do other things
        > > >while working. HI was the common command for left and HO was used to
        > > >tell the team to go right. A clicking of the tongue was a common move
        >to
        > > >start the team and of course everyone knows the WHOA command to stop.
        > > >We commonly tied off the reins to the front of the wagon while loading
        > > >hay and used voice commands to drive the team. The last I drove was as
        > > >a teenager, Many moons ago!
        > > >
        > > > So how do we determine the fact from the fiction?
        > > >
        > > >Frank Pierson
        > > >
        > > >
        >
        >
        >I missed the original reference to this question, but we used "gee" for
        >right turn and "haw" for left turn and, of course, "giddyap" and "whoa". I
        >could not find any dictionary references for hi and ho referring to 'left'
        >and 'right', only 'hey' or 'hello' and whoa, respectively. I'd be
        >interested to know whether this was a NYS colloquialism - just curious, and
        >I apologize for the off-topic comment.
        >
        >Al Askerberg
        >
        >
        >


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      • Frank Pierson
        ... I m certain local heritage had something to do with it. My Grandparents on my fathers side couldn t truly speak english, only a limited amount of english.
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 6, 2003


          Askerberg wrote:

          > >From: Frank Pierson <fpierson@...>
          > >Reply-To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
          > >To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
          > >Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Origin of Hojack (Was: RW&O)
          > >Date: Wed, 01 Jan 2003 06:09:04 -0500
          > >
          > >I hate to stir the pot on this, but I know how history tends to change
          > >the facts a bit. Many team drivers of both horses and asses trained
          > >there teams to respond to verbal commands so they could do other things
          > >while working. HI was the common command for left and HO was used to
          > >tell the team to go right. A clicking of the tongue was a common move to
          > >start the team  and of course everyone knows the WHOA command to stop.
          > >We commonly tied off the reins to the front of the wagon while loading
          > >hay and used voice commands to drive the team.  The last I drove was as
          > >a teenager, Many moons ago!
          > >
          > >     So how do we determine the fact from the fiction?
          > >
          > >Frank Pierson
          > >
          > >


          I missed the original reference to this question, but we used "gee" for
          right turn and "haw" for left turn and, of course, "giddyap" and "whoa".  I
          could not find any dictionary references for hi and ho referring to 'left'
          and 'right', only 'hey' or 'hello' and whoa, respectively.  I'd be
          interested to know whether this was a NYS colloquialism - just curious, and
          I apologize for the off-topic comment.

          Al Askerberg

          Al,
              I'm certain local heritage had something to do with it. My Grandparents on my fathers side couldn't truly speak english, only a limited amount of english. I have also driven teams that responded to GEE and HAW, but HI and HO were what Blackjack and Molly responded to and believe me, they were good!

          Frank




          Visit Gino's Railpage at http://www.fjgrr.com
          Visit The Greater Capital District Railfan Assocation at http://gcdranet.homelinux.com/


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