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Connection to FJ&G?

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  • nellisc@xxxxxxxx.xxx
    Would like to know how others of the group are related to the FJ&G? My Grandfather (Joram Nellis) was a conductor on the Northville Branch until its end when
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 4 9:46 PM
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      Would like to know how others of the group are related to the FJ&G? My Grandfather (Joram Nellis) was a conductor on the Northville Branch until its end when the Sacandaga Reservoir filled. My father worked at the Sacandaga Park during the 1920's era and rode the Northville Branch often. He regaled me with numerous FJ&G stories until his death a couple years ago - wish I had paid more attention and recorded them.

      Favorite story from a Leader - Republican (or Morning Herald) columnist was his title for the FJ&G - the Funny, Jumpy and Gruesome Railroad.

      Carl Nellis
    • Paul Charland
      p.charlie@sympatico.ca In response to Carl s letter, I do not have any true connection to the FJ&G, other that as a model railroader. Back in the ‘80 s I
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 5 7:50 AM
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        p.charlie@...

        In response to Carl's letter, I do not have any true connection to the
        FJ&G, other that as a model railroader. Back in the �80's I was looking
        for a shortline to model, and while looking through old magazines, came
        across an article in a �77 Model Railroader. It was a series of
        articles written by Harold Russell on the FJ&G. Thirty customers in
        twenty miles, the bulk of the tonnage going up a stiff grade, light
        power, and a connection to a busy mainline, all added up to a pretty
        interesting little railroad.

        A couple of months later, a modeler friend of mine got a set of 1960
        Trains magazines, and there was an excellent article an on the FJ&G,
        including a bit of passenger service, and some more on the history of
        the railroad. I was surprised to read about the little shortline that
        had done everything that the big guys were doing, freight, passenger,
        electric, buses, and highway freight. Since then, I've been a fan.

        Unfortunately, by the time I figured all this out, the railroad was
        meeting it's untimely death. I never got a chance to see it in the
        flesh, and have only managed to collect a few articles, and an employees
        time table, 1954, which I plan on e-mailing the group as soon as I find
        out how to do that.

        So, for the most part, I am here to learn. If I can contribute, I will.

        Paul Charland
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