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FW: FJ&G carbarn

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  • Gino And Kelly DiCarlo
    John Smatlak from the Orange Empire Musuem sent me this email. I wanted to share it with all of you... Gino ... From: John Smatlak
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 7, 2000
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      John Smatlak from the Orange Empire Musuem sent me this email.
      I wanted to share it with all of you...

      Gino

      ----------
      From: John Smatlak <jsmatlak@...>
      Date: Sat, 05 Aug 2000 07:40:37 -0700
      To: Aaron Keller <mgaj@...>
      Cc: Gino DiCarlo <dicarlos@...>
      Subject: FJ&G carbarn

      I did get a tour of the old carbarn in October 1996. The owners of Twin
      City Leathers were well aware of the building's heritage and were happy
      to provide a tour. I took a few slides, although the vegetation was so
      thick around the outside of the building it was hard to get a good
      picture. The front of the building had been modified with different
      doors and some roofing shingles, but otherwise retained its carbarn
      appearance.

      Inside, the building remained much as it had been in its railway days,
      except there was no equipment or machinery anywhere. (It was easy to
      visualize the scene in the one picture everyone has of the carbarn
      interior with a Bullet car sitting on one of the tracks). It was just a
      big empty barn used for storage of hides and other materials. The rails
      were still visible in the floor, and there were even a few trolley wire
      hangers in place up in the rafters. Not much else in the way of trolley
      era artifacts, except for one thing; when the pit track had been filled
      in in the early 1990s (to provide more floor area for storage) they had
      pulled out a heavy-duty "pit jack". This was a small cart, running on
      about 18" gauge rails in the floor of the pit, which had a track jack
      mounted to it. This would have been used for jobs such as lowering the
      bottom half of a split-frame motor from underneath a trolley car. The
      owners had no interest in saving this particular piece, so I paid to
      have it shipped out to Orange Empire Railway Museum. It was not exactly
      in good condition, owing to the fact that the pit track flooded on a
      regular basis. In fact it looked like an artifact salvaged from the
      Titanic! Anyway, that's about all that I found.

      Its incredible to think that the building had lasted as long as it did,
      and its a real shame for it to have ended this way!

      -John Smatlak
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