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My Three Cents

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  • mwilber2001
    As for Coleco,Gino was right about the need for plastic. In the late 70 s to early 80 s,when Coleco was booming,the biggest products were Pinball Machines and
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 29, 2009
      As for Coleco,Gino was right about the need for plastic. In the late 70's to early 80's,when Coleco was booming,the biggest products were Pinball Machines and Swimming Pools. Their #1 customer was Montgomery Wards.When Montgomery Wards deleted their catalogs,thats when the floor dropped out from Coleco's feet. Then the electronic games came into the scene,and were not shipped by rail.I remember asking about that,and was told that there was too much risk transporting those expensive games by rail,than by truck. The Cabbage Patch dolls came out,but they were made in Japan with Coleco's name on it.
      Plastic Pellets were shipped from Utica to Gloversville by Paul Dwyer Trucking business. Paul was also on the Delaware Otsego's Board of Directors. Paul was also Plant Manager for Coleco.
      The 200 so call box cars for Karg Bros. was a laugh. The price for hides were down,so Karg ordered more than they could handle.They were unloading 5 cars a day,while 10 loads a day were being interchage to us.That went on for weeks. With the cars being stored everywhere,and the hot sun was beating down on them, little black flies started to infest everywhere.DEC was called in to investigate and found they were coming from the box cars. Ended up the DEC had to spray all the cars,which must of be costly. Then the AAR was threating to embargo the FJG until the cars was to be unloaded at a faster rate. Alot of those hides were so spoiled by the hot sun,sitting in those box cars for a long period.They might of bought those hides at a cheap rate,but in the long run,they had to lose alot of money in the process.
    • Dicarlo, Gino
      Coleco did ship the plastic shells for the Colecovision Game Console. It was a boxcar full of those that were set on fire by vandals at Broadalbin Junction.
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 29, 2009

        Coleco did ship the plastic shells for the Colecovision Game Console.  It was a boxcar full of those that were set on fire by vandals at Broadalbin Junction.  Still, I'm not sure how many shells were shipped.  Colecovision was popular, but the gamble on Coleco's entry into the home computer market (Adam) proved to be financial disaster...

         

        Gino

         

        From: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com [mailto:FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of mwilber2001
        Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2009 9:10 PM
        To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [FJGRailroad] My Three Cents

         

         

        As for Coleco,Gino was right about the need for plastic. In the late 70's to early 80's,when Coleco was booming,the biggest products were Pinball Machines and Swimming Pools. Their #1 customer was Montgomery Wards.When Montgomery Wards deleted their catalogs,thats when the floor dropped out from Coleco's feet. Then the electronic games came into the scene,and were not shipped by rail.I remember asking about that,and was told that there was too much risk transporting those expensive games by rail,than by truck. The Cabbage Patch dolls came out,but they were made in Japan with Coleco's name on it.
        Plastic Pellets were shipped from Utica to Gloversville by Paul Dwyer Trucking business. Paul was also on the Delaware Otsego's Board of Directors. Paul was also Plant Manager for Coleco.
        The 200 so call box cars for Karg Bros. was a laugh. The price for hides were down,so Karg ordered more than they could handle.They were unloading 5 cars a day,while 10 loads a day were being interchage to us.That went on for weeks. With the cars being stored everywhere,and the hot sun was beating down on them, little black flies started to infest everywhere.DEC was called in to investigate and found they were coming from the box cars. Ended up the DEC had to spray all the cars,which must of be costly. Then the AAR was threating to embargo the FJG until the cars was to be unloaded at a faster rate. Alot of those hides were so spoiled by the hot sun,sitting in those box cars for a long period.They might of bought those hides at a cheap rate,but in the long run,they had to lose alot of money in the process.

      • John
        I remember when Coleco used to ship a lot of outbound cars. You could always recognize a Coleco outbound because it had the Do Not Hump placards on it. I
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 29, 2009
          I remember when Coleco used to ship a lot of outbound cars. You could always recognize a Coleco outbound because it had the "Do Not Hump" placards on it. I think Mark is correct about the electronics not going by rail. In addition to the damage potential there was also the theft potential when you had that dollar value in a boxcar. I worked on the assembly line at Patch Rd the summer of 1982 and I don't remember much rail activity going on. There were still a lot of plastic toys being made. I do also remember that fire. I think it was a Saturday on Easter or Mothers Day because I was at my parents in Gloversville. I heard the engine horn and wondered why they were running on a Saturday night. You could actually smell the plastic burning on the northeast side of Gloversville but I did not put 2 and 2 together until I drove up to Coleco looking for the train and saw fire trucks everywhere. You could only get to Blower Rd but they pulled the cars to Patch Rd to fight the fire. That was one of the cars pulled down by the trackmobile after the shutdown--scorched with a big glob of melted plastic inside.

          Mark, I remember the stink (so to speak) over those hide cars that were everywhere. Your right-what a mess.



          --- In FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com, "Dicarlo, Gino" <Gino.Dicarlo@...> wrote:
          >
          > Coleco did ship the plastic shells for the Colecovision Game Console. It was a boxcar full of those that were set on fire by vandals at Broadalbin Junction. Still, I'm not sure how many shells were shipped. Colecovision was popular, but the gamble on Coleco's entry into the home computer market (Adam) proved to be financial disaster...
          >
          > Gino
          >
          > From: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com [mailto:FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of mwilber2001
          > Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2009 9:10 PM
          > To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [FJGRailroad] My Three Cents
          >
          >
          >
          > As for Coleco,Gino was right about the need for plastic. In the late 70's to early 80's,when Coleco was booming,the biggest products were Pinball Machines and Swimming Pools. Their #1 customer was Montgomery Wards.When Montgomery Wards deleted their catalogs,thats when the floor dropped out from Coleco's feet. Then the electronic games came into the scene,and were not shipped by rail.I remember asking about that,and was told that there was too much risk transporting those expensive games by rail,than by truck. The Cabbage Patch dolls came out,but they were made in Japan with Coleco's name on it.
          > Plastic Pellets were shipped from Utica to Gloversville by Paul Dwyer Trucking business. Paul was also on the Delaware Otsego's Board of Directors. Paul was also Plant Manager for Coleco.
          > The 200 so call box cars for Karg Bros. was a laugh. The price for hides were down,so Karg ordered more than they could handle.They were unloading 5 cars a day,while 10 loads a day were being interchage to us.That went on for weeks. With the cars being stored everywhere,and the hot sun was beating down on them, little black flies started to infest everywhere.DEC was called in to investigate and found they were coming from the box cars. Ended up the DEC had to spray all the cars,which must of be costly. Then the AAR was threating to embargo the FJG until the cars was to be unloaded at a faster rate. Alot of those hides were so spoiled by the hot sun,sitting in those box cars for a long period.They might of bought those hides at a cheap rate,but in the long run,they had to lose alot of money in the process.
          >
        • Dicarlo, Gino
          John, I remember that fire very well. It was a Saturday and I think it was April. I think it was Easter. I lived on East State Street and the smoke was
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 29, 2009

            John,

             

            I remember that fire very well.  It was a Saturday and I think it was April.  I think it was Easter.  I lived

            on East State Street and the smoke was blowing by my house.  I got on my bike and rode down State

            and thought MCA was on fire.  The further I rode I noticed it was coming from Coleco.  I rode to

            Patch Road and the Mayfield Fire Police told me it was a boxcar and that a train was coming.

             

            I waited at the Patch Road crossing for an hour, but no train.  As you mentioned, I later heard the

            whistle at Kingsboro around 9:30.  I ran to the crossing and could see the light on the engine

            approaching the Arterial.  I was bummed.  I always wanted to see the FJ&G in the dark, especially

            at Kingsboro Ave.

             

             

            Gino

             

            From: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com [mailto:FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John
            Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2009 10:14 PM
            To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [FJGRailroad] Re: My Three Cents

             

             

            I remember when Coleco used to ship a lot of outbound cars. You could always recognize a Coleco outbound because it had the "Do Not Hump" placards on it. I think Mark is correct about the electronics not going by rail. In addition to the damage potential there was also the theft potential when you had that dollar value in a boxcar. I worked on the assembly line at Patch Rd the summer of 1982 and I don't remember much rail activity going on. There were still a lot of plastic toys being made. I do also remember that fire. I think it was a Saturday on Easter or Mothers Day because I was at my parents in Gloversville. I heard the engine horn and wondered why they were running on a Saturday night. You could actually smell the plastic burning on the northeast side of Gloversville but I did not put 2 and 2 together until I drove up to Coleco looking for the train and saw fire trucks everywhere. You could only get to Blower Rd but they pulled the cars to Patch Rd to fight the fire. That was one of the cars pulled down by the trackmobile after the shutdown--scorched with a big glob of melted plastic inside.

            Mark, I remember the stink (so to speak) over those hide cars that were everywhere. Your right-what a mess.

            --- In FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com, "Dicarlo, Gino" <Gino.Dicarlo@...> wrote:

            >
            > Coleco did ship the plastic shells for the Colecovision Game Console. It
            was a boxcar full of those that were set on fire by vandals at Broadalbin Junction. Still, I'm not sure how many shells were shipped. Colecovision was popular, but the gamble on Coleco's entry into the home computer market (Adam) proved to be financial disaster...
            >
            > Gino
            >
            > From: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of mwilber2001
            > Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2009 9:10 PM
            > To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [FJGRailroad] My Three Cents
            >
            >
            >
            > As for Coleco,Gino was right about the need for plastic. In the late 70's
            to early 80's,when Coleco was booming,the biggest products were Pinball Machines and Swimming Pools. Their #1 customer was Montgomery Wards.When Montgomery Wards deleted their catalogs,thats when the floor dropped out from Coleco's feet. Then the electronic games came into the scene,and were not shipped by rail.I remember asking about that,and was told that there was too much risk transporting those expensive games by rail,than by truck. The Cabbage Patch dolls came out,but they were made in Japan with Coleco's name on it.
            > Plastic Pellets were shipped from Utica to Gloversville by Paul Dwyer
            Trucking business. Paul was also on the Delaware Otsego's Board of Directors. Paul was also Plant Manager for Coleco.
            > The 200 so call box cars for Karg Bros. was a laugh. The price for hides
            were down,so Karg ordered more than they could handle.They were unloading 5 cars a day,while 10 loads a day were being interchage to us.That went on for weeks. With the cars being stored everywhere,and the hot sun was beating down on them, little black flies started to infest everywhere.DEC was called in to investigate and found they were coming from the box cars. Ended up the DEC had to spray all the cars,which must of be costly. Then the AAR was threating to embargo the FJG until the cars was to be unloaded at a faster rate. Alot of those hides were so spoiled by the hot sun,sitting in those box cars for a long period.They might of bought those hides at a cheap rate,but in the long run,they had to lose alot of money in the process.
            >

          • Mark Wilber
            Actually the car that was set on fire,were just parts that was being stored not shipped like the rest of the 60+ cars.Coleco didnt have the storage space for
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 30, 2009
              Actually the car that was set on fire,were just parts that was being stored not shipped like the rest of the 60+ cars.Coleco didnt have the storage space for those parts. When Coleco wanted certain parts,we had to drill out the 60+ cars to get to the certain one they wanted.Mark


              From: "Dicarlo, Gino" <Gino.Dicarlo@...>
              To: "FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com" <FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Thu, October 29, 2009 8:26:12 PM
              Subject: RE: [FJGRailroad] My Three Cents

               

              Coleco did ship the plastic shells for the Colecovision Game Console.  It was a boxcar full of those that were set on fire by vandals at Broadalbin Junction.  Still, I'm not sure how many shells were shipped.  Colecovision was popular, but the gamble on Coleco's entry into the home computer market (Adam) proved to be financial disaster...

               

              Gino

               

              From: FJGRailroad@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:FJGRailroad @yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of mwilber2001
              Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2009 9:10 PM
              To: FJGRailroad@ yahoogroups. com
              Subject: [FJGRailroad] My Three Cents

               

               

              As for Coleco,Gino was right about the need for plastic. In the late 70's to early 80's,when Coleco was booming,the biggest products were Pinball Machines and Swimming Pools. Their #1 customer was Montgomery Wards.When Montgomery Wards deleted their catalogs,thats when the floor dropped out from Coleco's feet. Then the electronic games came into the scene,and were not shipped by rail.I remember asking about that,and was told that there was too much risk transporting those expensive games by rail,than by truck. The Cabbage Patch dolls came out,but they were made in Japan with Coleco's name on it.
              Plastic Pellets were shipped from Utica to Gloversville by Paul Dwyer Trucking business. Paul was also on the Delaware Otsego's Board of Directors. Paul was also Plant Manager for Coleco.
              The 200 so call box cars for Karg Bros. was a laugh. The price for hides were down,so Karg ordered more than they could handle.They were unloading 5 cars a day,while 10 loads a day were being interchage to us.That went on for weeks. With the cars being stored everywhere,and the hot sun was beating down on them, little black flies started to infest everywhere.DEC was called in to investigate and found they were coming from the box cars. Ended up the DEC had to spray all the cars,which must of be costly. Then the AAR was threating to embargo the FJG until the cars was to be unloaded at a faster rate. Alot of those hides were so spoiled by the hot sun,sitting in those box cars for a long period.They might of bought those hides at a cheap rate,but in the long run,they had to lose alot of money in the process.


            • Aaron Keller
              Mark, Was this part of the storage on wheels program that I read about in one of the DO annual reports? Also, since you re back with us on the list, I m
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 30, 2009
                Mark,

                Was this part of the "storage on wheels" program that I read about in one of the DO annual reports?

                Also, since you're back with us on the list, I'm wondering if you would mind sharing a few FJ&G anecdotes with us.  What was it like pulling loads up the hill?  Which engine did you prefer and which ones gave the most trouble?  You're an experienced engineer and conductor and every railroad has its tricks when viewed from the cab.  Where did you have to exercise the most caution on the FJ&G and where was it smooth sailing?  Where were the most fun places to operate?  Did the light rail give you any trouble in any spots along the line? 

                I think most of us here would relish any details you might afford the group.

                -Aaron



                From: Mark Wilber <mwilber2001@...>
                To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Fri, October 30, 2009 8:17:32 PM
                Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] My Three Cents



                Actually the car that was set on fire,were just parts that was being stored not shipped like the rest of the 60+ cars.Coleco didnt have the storage space for those parts. When Coleco wanted certain parts,we had to drill out the 60+ cars to get to the certain one they wanted.Mark

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