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The Early Rails

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  • Aaron Keller
    I am not sure how far along anyone else is in reading Paul Larner s book, which is excellent, by the way, but a subject contained therein is how the FJ&G put
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 10 4:45 PM
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      I am not sure how far along anyone else is in reading Paul Larner's book, which is excellent, by the way, but a subject contained therein is how the FJ&G put off many improvements until absolutely necessary.

      One question on hand is how often the rails were replaced, and when.  I know Paul's book contains several references to changes in the right of way but the average reader would probably be bored by details such as those we might discuss here.

      Does anybody know from which foundry the original iron rails came, and the weight thereof?

      The ICC reports in my possession indicate the following general synopsis of the later steel rails:

      Miles 1-5 of the railroad, basically from Fonda through the south end of Johnstown, were of 75# rail in 1928; most of the rail milled in 1901.

      From Johstown to Gloersville, the railroad operated on 80# rail, milled in 1907, 1911, 1916, and 1923; with a few 70# sections, milled in 1893.

      The line to Northville was exclusively 70# Scranton Bessimer rail, milled in 1895 and 1897.

      The short stretch of "main line" between the Northville depot and the end of track was milled in 1883 by the Troy Iron Works.

      The various makers of rail are:
      O. H.
      Dudley
      A. S. C. E.
      Scranton Bessimer
      Troy
      P. S. Co.
      Cambria (sidings only)
      Barrow (sidings only)

      The sidings at this point in time were mostly 60# rail, milled in 1879; or of 70# rail milled in 1889; or during some years fluctuating in between those extremes.

      The majority of the yard in Gloversville was at the time of the valuation comprised of rail of the 1894 vintage.

      The stub-ended siding constructed between the ice house and the north side of the Gloversville station contained in 1928 the oldest rail on the railroad, 1873 Barrow, 55 pounds.

      -Aaron
      _

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