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"From the Archives"

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  • Aaron Keller
    I m continuing Joe Klapkowski s idea and posting a few notes From the Archives. Since the economy seems to be on everyone s mind, why not take a look at
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 15, 2009
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      I'm continuing Joe Klapkowski's idea and posting a few notes "From the Archives."  Since the economy seems to be on everyone's mind, why not take a look at shipping costs on the railroad, bills payable, and wages.

      (1) Bill collectible from the Little Falls and Johnstown Railroad Company to the FJ&G, July 1912.  Telephone toll call from Mr. J. Ledlie Hees, New York City, to Johnstown on May 25.  Cost, $1.25.  Signed for by one employee as being correct; by Geo. A. Harris as being examined and audited; by W. H. Collins as being approved; and by another person whose name is not legible as being paid.  Four signatures for a dollar and a quarter!  In today's dollars, that's roughly $27.00.

      (2) IRS Form W-2, from the FJ&G to Casper W. Keller, a relative of mine.  The year was 1945.  Wages, $713.73.  In today's dollars, $8,335.89.  Not bad for part-time work.  (The government took out 10% back then).

      (3) Station Record.  Car load of bit coal from Somerville, Pa., to Broadalbin Knit.  Date:  October 21, 1946.  Cost of shipment, $198.79.  In today's dollars, $2,143.14.  I wonder how long it would have taken the factory to burn through 50 tons of coal?  What was their yearly inbound traffic revenue to the FJ&G, just on coal?  That answer will have to wait until I dig out the entire station ledger.

      (4) Station Record.  Two cartons of merchandise from Poughkeepsie to Morton & Roseman, Broadalbin, year 1946.  Cost of shipment, 60 cents.  That included the two cent tax.  Today's cost, $6.47.  The cartons were shipped on September 21 and arrived October 17.  Nearly a month was considered express? 

      (5) Letter dated December 15, 1949, advising Broadalbin agent R. Bowers to accept perishable freight; but only after declaring to customers that it would get "box car service" as the FJ&G did not have reefer service.

      And that's it for this edition of "From the Archives."

      What's in your archive?

      -Aaron

    • joseph Klapkowski
      Wow, $1.25 for one phone call........I wonder how complicated it was to make that call back in 1912........ To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com From:
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 15, 2009
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        Wow, $1.25 for one phone call........I wonder how complicated it was to make that call back in 1912........
         

        To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
        From: akeller_1979@...
        Date: Sun, 15 Feb 2009 00:40:39 -0800
        Subject: [FJGRailroad] "From the Archives"

        I'm continuing Joe Klapkowski's idea and posting a few notes "From the Archives."  Since the economy seems to be on everyone's mind, why not take a look at shipping costs on the railroad, bills payable, and wages.

        (1) Bill collectible from the Little Falls and Johnstown Railroad Company to the FJ&G, July 1912.  Telephone toll call from Mr. J. Ledlie Hees, New York City, to Johnstown on May 25.  Cost, $1.25.  Signed for by one employee as being correct; by Geo. A. Harris as being examined and audited; by W. H. Collins as being approved; and by another person whose name is not legible as being paid.  Four signatures for a dollar and a quarter!  In today's dollars, that's roughly $27.00.

        (2) IRS Form W-2, from the FJ&G to Casper W. Keller, a relative of mine.  The year was 1945.  Wages, $713.73.  In today's dollars, $8,335.89.  Not bad for part-time work.  (The government took out 10% back then).

        (3) Station Record.  Car load of bit coal from Somerville, Pa., to Broadalbin Knit.  Date:  October 21, 1946.  Cost of shipment, $198.79.  In today's dollars, $2,143.14.  I wonder how long it would have taken the factory to burn through 50 tons of coal?  What was their yearly inbound traffic revenue to the FJ&G, just on coal?  That answer will have to wait until I dig out the entire station ledger.

        (4) Station Record.  Two cartons of merchandise from Poughkeepsie to Morton & Roseman, Broadalbin, year 1946.  Cost of shipment, 60 cents.  That included the two cent tax.  Today's cost, $6.47.  The cartons were shipped on September 21 and arrived October 17.  Nearly a month was considered express? 

        (5) Letter dated December 15, 1949, advising Broadalbin agent R. Bowers to accept perishable freight; but only after declaring to customers that it would get "box car service" as the FJ&G did not have reefer service.

        And that's it for this edition of "From the Archives."

        What's in your archive?

        -Aaron




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      • Aaron Keller
        Back then everything was obviously manually switched... ________________________________ From: joseph Klapkowski To: Fonda Johnstown
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 15, 2009
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          Back then everything was obviously manually switched...


          From: joseph Klapkowski <riverlinejoe@...>
          To: Fonda Johnstown <fjgrailroad@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sunday, February 15, 2009 7:07:59 AM
          Subject: RE: [FJGRailroad] "From the Archives"

          Wow, $1.25 for one phone call........I wonder how complicated it was to make that call back in 1912........

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