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Re: [FJGRailroad] Re: [HudsonRiverRailLines] Re: From The Archives - Where's the hopper!

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  • Malcolm Horton
    The reason for building the Great Sacandaga Lake was to stabilize the flow of the Hudson River in late summers so the many paper mills and hydroelectric plants
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 9, 2007
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      The reason for building the Great Sacandaga Lake was to stabilize the flow of the Hudson River in late summers so the many paper mills and hydroelectric plants could continue to operate. 95% of the cost of building the reservoir was paid by the paper mills and power companies and 5% was paid by the state for flood control.
       
      The release of water for purposes of controlling the salt barrier below Poughkeepsie is an unanticipated use of this water and has occurred only in very recent years.
       
      Malcolm Horton
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Saturday, June 09, 2007 1:29 AM
      Subject: [FJGRailroad] Re: [HudsonRiverRailLines] Re: From The Archives - Where's the hopper!

      Back in the 1930, the State of New York decided to build a dam and create
      the Great Sacandaga Reservoir. The reason is that several communities get
      thier drinking water from the Hudson River. I believe Poughkeepsie gets at
      least some of thier drinking water from the Hudson. In periods of drought,
      the Hudson becomes much more briney. So the Sacandaga was created to allow
      for more water to be released into the Mohawk and subsequently the Hudson to
      counteract this problem. I believe the dam is at Conklinville, N.Y.

      The water rose much more quickly than anyone envisioned and as a result the
      Fonda johnstown & Gloversville line to Northville was flooded before they
      could get all the cars out of Northville, the northern end of the line. You
      have probably seen a picture of an engine that appears to be sailing along
      the water. This was the FJ&G's steam engine going to Northville to retrive
      the last cars at the end of the line.

      I am not entirely certain but I believe the rails were torn up in the face
      of the rising water. Once in a great while, during a period of severe
      drought, the Sacandaga gets so low (I have been told) that there are places
      where the old right of way becomes visible.

      >> Although I remember in the later 80s-early 90s there was a severe
      >drought so much so that the Hudson River was low also and tidal salt water
      >made it far enough north to create a brackish mix when pumped into the
      >aqueduct. There was also environmental concern about non-native species
      >entering the reservoirs in the Croton system. Those were the years that
      >the Ashokin Res in the Catskills was nearly dry.
      >
      > >
      >
      >
      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >

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