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Brill #127

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  • Saul Kalbfeld
    I looked at #127 at the Orange Empire Railroad Museum website and it s looking good. Car has been painted back to the original FJ&G colors and the mechanical
    Message 1 of 16 , Apr 24, 2007
      I looked at #127 at the Orange Empire Railroad Museum website and it's looking good. Car has been painted back to the original FJ&G colors and the mechanical restoration is progressing. Take a look at http://www.oerm.org/pages/brr127.html.
      Is this the only survivor of the original group?
      Regards,
      Saul
       
      And also, does anyone know the grade of the ex-NYC cutoff at Hoffmans, where the freightline branches off and crosses the river to Selkirk? This area is away from Rt. 5 so I never had a chance to look at the ROW here.
      Again,
      Regards
    • Aaron Keller
      Another one exists at a restaurant in Utah. I m assuming this is one of the Bamberger/FJ&G units: http://www.dhke.com/railroad/utah/art.htm -Aaron
      Message 2 of 16 , Apr 24, 2007
        Another one exists at a restaurant in Utah. I'm assuming this is one of
        the Bamberger/FJ&G units:
        http://www.dhke.com/railroad/utah/art.htm

        -Aaron
      • Glenn J. Williams
        ... has been painted back to the original FJ&G colors and the mechanical restoration is progressing. Take a look at http://www.oerm.org/pages/brr127.html. ...
        Message 3 of 16 , Apr 25, 2007
          --- In FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com, "Saul Kalbfeld" <fjgbus@...> wrote:
          >
          > I looked at #127 at the Orange Empire Railroad Museum website and it's looking good. Car
          has been painted back to the original FJ&G colors and the mechanical restoration is
          progressing. Take a look at http://www.oerm.org/pages/brr127.html.
          > Is this the only survivor of the original group?
          > Regards,
          > Saul
          >

          While I am willing to be proven wrong, I read that the 127 was actually repainted in the
          Bamberger colours. In prepping the car, they stripped off some of the existing paint to
          discover the FJ&G lettering just to the left of the entrance door, just above the bottom sill.
          Pictures were taken of the lettering and repainting continued. IIRC, this was on the OER web
          site.

          The orange and yellow shown are too dull for the FJ&G's traction orange and yellow. Think of
          the orange and yellow on the 20 and 21 and 30 and 340.

          Glenn
          Penacook, NH
        • Gino's Railpage
          Yeah, Glenn s right! The restored the 127 to Bamberger, not FJ&G paint! Before they painted, I was told this by John Smatlek from the OEM and asked why not
          Message 4 of 16 , Apr 25, 2007
            Yeah, Glenn's right!  The restored the 127 to Bamberger, not FJ&G paint!  Before they
            painted, I was told this by John Smatlek from the OEM and asked why not FJ&G paint.
            He said it was a Bamberger Car way longer then the FJ&G.  I'm sad, but he's right!

            Gino

            On 4/25/07, Glenn J. Williams <gjwilliams@...> wrote:

            --- In FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com, "Saul Kalbfeld" <fjgbus@...> wrote:
            >
            > I looked at #127 at the Orange Empire Railroad Museum website and it's looking good. Car
            has been painted back to the original FJ&G colors and the mechanical restoration is
            progressing. Take a look at http://www.oerm.org/pages/brr127.html.
            > Is this the only survivor of the original group?
            > Regards,
            > Saul
            >

            While I am willing to be proven wrong, I read that the 127 was actually repainted in the
            Bamberger colours. In prepping the car, they stripped off some of the existing paint to
            discover the FJ&G lettering just to the left of the entrance door, just above the bottom sill.
            Pictures were taken of the lettering and repainting continued. IIRC, this was on the OER web
            site.

            The orange and yellow shown are too dull for the FJ&G's traction orange and yellow. Think of
            the orange and yellow on the 20 and 21 and 30 and 340.

            Glenn
            Penacook, NH




            --
            www.ginosrailpage.com
            www.fjgrr.org
          • Paul Larner
            I once heard a similar analogy relating to time on the property being the decider (shouldn t have used that word)about a step mother. Just because she was
            Message 5 of 16 , Apr 25, 2007
              I once heard a similar analogy relating to time on the property being the "decider" (shouldn't have used that word)about a step mother.  Just because she was with one's father longer doesn't make her one's mother. 
               
              THe 127 should have been painted FJ&G colors.  Had the  FJ&G not taken the risk in ordering these lightweights, they wouldn't exist.  No other company ordered "Baby" Brills.  Bamberger bought them at liquidation prices with little if any risk. Crummied them up with a staging to hold the trolley pole.   Should be traction orange, cream and black but it isn't my money...
               
              PKL 





              To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
              From: fjgrailroad@...
              Date: Wed, 25 Apr 2007 14:51:44 -0400
              Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Re: Brill #127

              Yeah, Glenn's right!  The restored the 127 to Bamberger, not FJ&G paint!  Before they
              painted, I was told this by John Smatlek from the OEM and asked why not FJ&G paint.
              He said it was a Bamberger Car way longer then the FJ&G.  I'm sad, but he's right!

              Gino

              On 4/25/07, Glenn J. Williams <gjwilliams@mac. com> wrote:

              --- In FJGRailroad@ yahoogroups. com, "Saul Kalbfeld" <fjgbus@...> wrote:
              >
              > I looked at #127 at the Orange Empire Railroad Museum website and it's looking good. Car
              has been painted back to the original FJ&G colors and the mechanical restoration is
              progressing. Take a look at http://www.oerm. org/pages/ brr127.html.
              > Is this the only survivor of the original group?
              > Regards,
              > Saul
              >

              While I am willing to be proven wrong, I read that the 127 was actually repainted in the
              Bamberger colours. In prepping the car, they stripped off some of the existing paint to
              discover the FJ&G lettering just to the left of the entrance door, just above the bottom sill.
              Pictures were taken of the lettering and repainting continued. IIRC, this was on the OER web
              site.

              The orange and yellow shown are too dull for the FJ&G's traction orange and yellow. Think of
              the orange and yellow on the 20 and 21 and 30 and 340.

              Glenn
              Penacook, NH





              --
              www.ginosrailpage. com
              www.fjgrr.org
            • Stephen G. Myers
              Kind of like the Great Northern ALCO at the Schenectady Museum. Wouldn t you think they would choose a local railroad scheme? Steve On Wed, 25 Apr 2007
              Message 6 of 16 , Apr 25, 2007

                I once heard a similar analogy relating to time on the property being the "decider" (shouldn't have used that word)about a step mother.  Just because she was with one's father longer doesn't make her one's mother. 
                 
                THe 127 should have been painted FJ&G colors.  Had the  FJ&G not taken the risk in ordering these lightweights, they wouldn't exist.  No other company ordered "Baby" Brills.  Bamberger bought them at liquidation prices with little if any risk. Crummied them up with a staging to hold the trolley pole.   Should be traction orange, cream and black but it isn't my money...
                 
                PKL 





                To: FJGRailroad@ yahoogroups. com
                From: fjgrailroad@ gmail.com
                Date: Wed, 25 Apr 2007 14:51:44 -0400
                Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Re: Brill #127

                Yeah, Glenn's right!  The restored the 127 to Bamberger, not FJ&G paint!  Before they
                painted, I was told this by John Smatlek from the OEM and asked why not FJ&G paint.
                He said it was a Bamberger Car way longer then the FJ&G.  I'm sad, but he's right!

                Gino

                On 4/25/07, Glenn J. Williams <gjwilliams@mac. com> wrote:

                --- In FJGRailroad@ yahoogroups. com, "Saul Kalbfeld" <fjgbus@...> wrote:
                >
                > I looked at #127 at the Orange Empire Railroad Museum website and it's looking good. Car
                has been painted back to the original FJ&G colors and the mechanical restoration is
                progressing. Take a look at http://www.oerm. org/pages/ brr127.html.
                > Is this the only survivor of the original group?
                > Regards,
                > Saul
                >

                While I am willing to be proven wrong, I read that the 127 was actually repainted in the
                Bamberger colours. In prepping the car, they stripped off some of the existing paint to
                discover the FJ&G lettering just to the left of the entrance door, just above the bottom sill.
                Pictures were taken of the lettering and repainting continued. IIRC, this was on the OER web
                site.

                The orange and yellow shown are too dull for the FJ&G's traction orange and yellow. Think of
                the orange and yellow on the 20 and 21 and 30 and 340.

                Glenn
                Penacook, NH





                --
                www.ginosrailpage. com
                www.fjgrr.org

                 
              • Gino's Railpage
                OK, I was being diplomatic. I m PO d that it isn t being restored to FJ&G colors. What really hurt is they painted over the Fonda Johnstown Gloversville
                Message 7 of 16 , Apr 26, 2007
                  OK, I was being diplomatic.  I'm PO'd that it isn't being restored to FJ&G colors.
                  What really hurt is they painted over the "Fonda Johnstown Gloversville Schenectady"
                  under the windows.  I've got a photo somewhere of this before they re-painted over it!
                   
                  Yes, it's not my money, but as Paul said, if it weren't for the FJ&G there wouldn't
                  be Bamberger Bullets!!!
                   
                  Gino

                   
                  On 4/25/07, Paul Larner <pklarner@...> wrote:

                  I once heard a similar analogy relating to time on the property being the "decider" (shouldn't have used that word)about a step mother.  Just because she was with one's father longer doesn't make her one's mother. 
                   
                  THe 127 should have been painted FJ&G colors.  Had the  FJ&G not taken the risk in ordering these lightweights, they wouldn't exist.  No other company ordered "Baby" Brills.  Bamberger bought them at liquidation prices with little if any risk. Crummied them up with a staging to hold the trolley pole.   Should be traction orange, cream and black but it isn't my money...
                   
                  PKL 





                  To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
                  From: fjgrailroad@gmail.com
                  Date: Wed, 25 Apr 2007 14:51:44 -0400
                  Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Re: Brill #127

                  Yeah, Glenn's right!  The restored the 127 to Bamberger, not FJ&G paint!  Before they
                  painted, I was told this by John Smatlek from the OEM and asked why not FJ&G paint.
                  He said it was a Bamberger Car way longer then the FJ&G.  I'm sad, but he's right!

                  Gino

                  On 4/25/07, Glenn J. Williams <gjwilliams@...> wrote:

                  --- In FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com, "Saul Kalbfeld" <fjgbus@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I looked at #127 at the Orange Empire Railroad Museum website and it's looking good. Car
                  has been painted back to the original FJ&G colors and the mechanical restoration is
                  progressing. Take a look at http://www.oerm.org/pages/brr127.html.
                  > Is this the only survivor of the original group?
                  > Regards,
                  > Saul
                  >

                  While I am willing to be proven wrong, I read that the 127 was actually repainted in the
                  Bamberger colours. In prepping the car, they stripped off some of the existing paint to
                  discover the FJ&G lettering just to the left of the entrance door, just above the bottom sill.
                  Pictures were taken of the lettering and repainting continued. IIRC, this was on the OER web
                  site.

                  The orange and yellow shown are too dull for the FJ&G's traction orange and yellow. Think of
                  the orange and yellow on the 20 and 21 and 30 and 340.

                  Glenn
                  Penacook, NH





                  --
                  www.ginosrailpage.com
                  www.fjgrr.org




                  --
                  www.ginosrailpage.com
                  www.fjgrr.org
                • Glenn J. Williams
                  ... Sad but true, Gino. With the 70th anniversary of the Electric Division s demise coming next August, there are few left in our area who remember the
                  Message 8 of 16 , Apr 26, 2007
                    --- In FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com, "Gino's Railpage" <fjgrailroad@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > OK, I was being diplomatic. I'm PO'd that it isn't being restored to FJ&G
                    > colors.
                    > What really hurt is they painted over the "Fonda Johnstown Gloversville
                    > Schenectady"
                    > under the windows. I've got a photo somewhere of this before they
                    > re-painted over it!
                    >
                    > Yes, it's not my money, but as Paul said, if it weren't for the FJ&G there
                    > wouldn't be Bamberger Bullets!!!
                    >
                    > Gino
                    >

                    Sad but true, Gino. With the 70th anniversary of the Electric Division's demise coming
                    next August, there are few left in our area who remember the Bullets, let alone rode them.

                    In 1956, I discovered that my next-door neighbour's wife - a Utah native - worked for the
                    UP as a turntable operator during WW II and commuted to work on the Bullets. "Went like
                    the wind," was the way she put it. She recalls their being smooth riders, too.

                    BTW, the step platform on the roof for the trolley pole was needed 'cuz the wire height out
                    west was higher than was the case on eastern roads. The extra height maintained proper
                    pressure on the wire and also made for easier backup moves.

                    Glenn
                    Penacook, NH
                  • Gino's Railpage
                    I think our own Mal Horton has had the pleasure of riding the Bullets. He may have some other connection also... Gino ... -- www.ginosrailpage.com
                    Message 9 of 16 , Apr 26, 2007
                      I think our own Mal Horton has had the pleasure of riding the Bullets.  He may
                      have some other connection also...
                       
                      Gino

                       
                      On 4/26/07, Glenn J. Williams <gjwilliams@...> wrote:

                      --- In FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com, "Gino's Railpage" <fjgrailroad@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > OK, I was being diplomatic. I'm PO'd that it isn't being restored to FJ&G
                      > colors.
                      > What really hurt is they painted over the "Fonda Johnstown Gloversville
                      > Schenectady"
                      > under the windows. I've got a photo somewhere of this before they
                      > re-painted over it!
                      >
                      > Yes, it's not my money, but as Paul said, if it weren't for the FJ&G there
                      > wouldn't be Bamberger Bullets!!!
                      >
                      > Gino
                      >

                      Sad but true, Gino. With the 70th anniversary of the Electric Division's demise coming
                      next August, there are few left in our area who remember the Bullets, let alone rode them.

                      In 1956, I discovered that my next-door neighbour's wife - a Utah native - worked for the
                      UP as a turntable operator during WW II and commuted to work on the Bullets. "Went like
                      the wind," was the way she put it. She recalls their being smooth riders, too.

                      BTW, the step platform on the roof for the trolley pole was needed 'cuz the wire height out
                      west was higher than was the case on eastern roads. The extra height maintained proper
                      pressure on the wire and also made for easier backup moves.

                      Glenn
                      Penacook, NH




                      --
                      www.ginosrailpage.com
                      www.fjgrr.org
                    • Malcolm Horton
                      I had the pleasure of riding the Bullets many times from Gloversville to Schenectady. It was a real thrill. They accelerated so smoothly and ran so fast. As I
                      Message 10 of 16 , Apr 26, 2007
                        I had the pleasure of riding the Bullets many times from Gloversville to Schenectady. It was a real thrill. They accelerated so smoothly and ran so fast. As I recall the speed was controlled by a foot pedal rather than by the usual controller found in most trolley cars. The brakes had a conventional hand control. On several occasions. the trolley pole jumped off of the wire at high speed, usually between Schenectady and Amsterdam. The emergency, battery operated, internal lights would come on. The motorman then opened the rear door and went outside to place the pole back onto the wire. When this was done the regular lights would come back on and the air compressor would start to recharge the air brake tanks.
                         
                        The cars had a rest room and an ice water spigot for cold drinking water. Paper cups were provided. There was an observation lounge at the rear where one could sit and look out of the rear windows.
                         
                        In 1952, I visited Salt Lake City while on a vacation trip to Yellowstone National Park. I took time out and rode one of the Bullets from Salt Lake to Ogden and back. The motorman said that the cars were about to be replaced by busses. A fire at the Ogden end of the line had destroyed the power house serving the north end of the Bamberger Line. The voltage kept getting lower and lower as we approached Ogden because all of the power was coming up from the Salt Lake end of the line, approximately 70 miles away. We made it into Ogden but very slowly.
                         
                        Malcolm Horton
                         
                         
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2007 2:52 PM
                        Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Re: Brill #127

                        I think our own Mal Horton has had the pleasure of riding the Bullets.  He may
                        have some other connection also...
                         
                        Gino

                         
                        On 4/26/07, Glenn J. Williams <gjwilliams@mac. com> wrote:

                        --- In FJGRailroad@ yahoogroups. com, "Gino's Railpage" <fjgrailroad@ ...> wrote:
                        >
                        > OK, I was being diplomatic. I'm PO'd that it isn't being restored to FJ&G
                        > colors.
                        > What really hurt is they painted over the "Fonda Johnstown Gloversville
                        > Schenectady"
                        > under the windows. I've got a photo somewhere of this before they
                        > re-painted over it!
                        >
                        > Yes, it's not my money, but as Paul said, if it weren't for the FJ&G there
                        > wouldn't be Bamberger Bullets!!!
                        >
                        > Gino
                        >

                        Sad but true, Gino. With the 70th anniversary of the Electric Division's demise coming
                        next August, there are few left in our area who remember the Bullets, let alone rode them.

                        In 1956, I discovered that my next-door neighbour's wife - a Utah native - worked for the
                        UP as a turntable operator during WW II and commuted to work on the Bullets. "Went like
                        the wind," was the way she put it. She recalls their being smooth riders, too.

                        BTW, the step platform on the roof for the trolley pole was needed 'cuz the wire height out
                        west was higher than was the case on eastern roads. The extra height maintained proper
                        pressure on the wire and also made for easier backup moves.

                        Glenn
                        Penacook, NH




                        --
                        www.ginosrailpage. com
                        www.fjgrr.org

                      • Gino's Railpage
                        Mal, Did they stop the Bullet to put the pole on the wire or was this done while still moving? Gino ... -- www.ginosrailpage.com www.fjgrr.org
                        Message 11 of 16 , Apr 26, 2007
                          Mal,
                           
                          Did they stop the Bullet to put the pole on the wire or was this done while still moving?
                           
                          Gino

                           
                          On 4/26/07, Malcolm Horton <mdhorton@...> wrote:

                          I had the pleasure of riding the Bullets many times from Gloversville to Schenectady. It was a real thrill. They accelerated so smoothly and ran so fast. As I recall the speed was controlled by a foot pedal rather than by the usual controller found in most trolley cars. The brakes had a conventional hand control. On several occasions. the trolley pole jumped off of the wire at high speed, usually between Schenectady and Amsterdam. The emergency, battery operated, internal lights would come on. The motorman then opened the rear door and went outside to place the pole back onto the wire. When this was done the regular lights would come back on and the air compressor would start to recharge the air brake tanks.
                           
                          The cars had a rest room and an ice water spigot for cold drinking water. Paper cups were provided. There was an observation lounge at the rear where one could sit and look out of the rear windows.
                           
                          In 1952, I visited Salt Lake City while on a vacation trip to Yellowstone National Park. I took time out and rode one of the Bullets from Salt Lake to Ogden and back. The motorman said that the cars were about to be replaced by busses. A fire at the Ogden end of the line had destroyed the power house serving the north end of the Bamberger Line. The voltage kept getting lower and lower as we approached Ogden because all of the power was coming up from the Salt Lake end of the line, approximately 70 miles away. We made it into Ogden but very slowly.
                           
                          Malcolm Horton
                           
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2007 2:52 PM
                          Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Re: Brill #127

                           

                          I think our own Mal Horton has had the pleasure of riding the Bullets.  He may
                          have some other connection also...
                           
                          Gino

                           
                          On 4/26/07, Glenn J. Williams < gjwilliams@...> wrote:

                          --- In FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com, "Gino's Railpage" <fjgrailroad@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > OK, I was being diplomatic. I'm PO'd that it isn't being restored to FJ&G
                          > colors.
                          > What really hurt is they painted over the "Fonda Johnstown Gloversville
                          > Schenectady"
                          > under the windows. I've got a photo somewhere of this before they
                          > re-painted over it!
                          >
                          > Yes, it's not my money, but as Paul said, if it weren't for the FJ&G there
                          > wouldn't be Bamberger Bullets!!!
                          >
                          > Gino
                          >

                          Sad but true, Gino. With the 70th anniversary of the Electric Division's demise coming
                          next August, there are few left in our area who remember the Bullets, let alone rode them.

                          In 1956, I discovered that my next-door neighbour's wife - a Utah native - worked for the
                          UP as a turntable operator during WW II and commuted to work on the Bullets. "Went like
                          the wind," was the way she put it. She recalls their being smooth riders, too.

                          BTW, the step platform on the roof for the trolley pole was needed 'cuz the wire height out
                          west was higher than was the case on eastern roads. The extra height maintained proper
                          pressure on the wire and also made for easier backup moves.

                          Glenn
                          Penacook, NH




                          --
                          www.ginosrailpage.com
                          www.fjgrr.org




                          --
                          www.ginosrailpage.com
                          www.fjgrr.org
                        • Malcolm Horton
                          Gino, They had to come to a full stop and the motorman had to go out to the back and pull the pole down, using the attached rope, and guide it on to the wire.
                          Message 12 of 16 , Apr 26, 2007
                            Gino,
                             
                            They had to come to a full stop and the motorman had to go out to the back and pull the pole down, using the attached rope, and guide it on to the wire.
                             
                            As a kid, I used to ride my bike down to the Gloversville car barns to see the action. Every car coming in from the Schenectady run was cleaned on the inside, the potty was emptied, The ice and the water was replaced and the car went on to a track pit where the trucks were lubricated. If the trolley pole had come off the wire during the previous trip, it would be bent into a curve cause by it hitting the crossarms which supported the overhead trolley wire. If the pole was bent, it would be removed and straightened. This was done by inserting the bottom end of the pole into a horizontal hole in one of the car barn roof support columns. Several guys on the other end of the pole would push down and rotate the pole until it had been straightened. It would then be reinstalled on the car. There was a vertical storage rack along one wall of the barn for trolley poles. If they didn't have time to straighten a trolley pole, they would grab an already straightened pole from the rack and straighten the bent pole later. 
                             
                            Mal
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2007 3:30 PM
                            Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Re: Brill #127

                            Mal,
                             
                            Did they stop the Bullet to put the pole on the wire or was this done while still moving?
                             
                            Gino

                             
                            On 4/26/07, Malcolm Horton <mdhorton@msn. com> wrote:

                            I had the pleasure of riding the Bullets many times from Gloversville to Schenectady. It was a real thrill. They accelerated so smoothly and ran so fast. As I recall the speed was controlled by a foot pedal rather than by the usual controller found in most trolley cars. The brakes had a conventional hand control. On several occasions. the trolley pole jumped off of the wire at high speed, usually between Schenectady and Amsterdam. The emergency, battery operated, internal lights would come on. The motorman then opened the rear door and went outside to place the pole back onto the wire. When this was done the regular lights would come back on and the air compressor would start to recharge the air brake tanks.
                             
                            The cars had a rest room and an ice water spigot for cold drinking water. Paper cups were provided. There was an observation lounge at the rear where one could sit and look out of the rear windows.
                             
                            In 1952, I visited Salt Lake City while on a vacation trip to Yellowstone National Park. I took time out and rode one of the Bullets from Salt Lake to Ogden and back. The motorman said that the cars were about to be replaced by busses. A fire at the Ogden end of the line had destroyed the power house serving the north end of the Bamberger Line. The voltage kept getting lower and lower as we approached Ogden because all of the power was coming up from the Salt Lake end of the line, approximately 70 miles away. We made it into Ogden but very slowly.
                             
                            Malcolm Horton
                             
                             
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2007 2:52 PM
                            Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Re: Brill #127

                             

                            I think our own Mal Horton has had the pleasure of riding the Bullets.  He may
                            have some other connection also...
                             
                            Gino

                             
                            On 4/26/07, Glenn J. Williams < gjwilliams@mac. com> wrote:

                            --- In FJGRailroad@ yahoogroups. com, "Gino's Railpage" <fjgrailroad@ ...> wrote:
                            >
                            > OK, I was being diplomatic. I'm PO'd that it isn't being restored to FJ&G
                            > colors.
                            > What really hurt is they painted over the "Fonda Johnstown Gloversville
                            > Schenectady"
                            > under the windows. I've got a photo somewhere of this before they
                            > re-painted over it!
                            >
                            > Yes, it's not my money, but as Paul said, if it weren't for the FJ&G there
                            > wouldn't be Bamberger Bullets!!!
                            >
                            > Gino
                            >

                            Sad but true, Gino. With the 70th anniversary of the Electric Division's demise coming
                            next August, there are few left in our area who remember the Bullets, let alone rode them.

                            In 1956, I discovered that my next-door neighbour's wife - a Utah native - worked for the
                            UP as a turntable operator during WW II and commuted to work on the Bullets. "Went like
                            the wind," was the way she put it. She recalls their being smooth riders, too.

                            BTW, the step platform on the roof for the trolley pole was needed 'cuz the wire height out
                            west was higher than was the case on eastern roads. The extra height maintained proper
                            pressure on the wire and also made for easier backup moves.

                            Glenn
                            Penacook, NH




                            --
                            www.ginosrailpage. com
                            www.fjgrr.org




                            --
                            www.ginosrailpage. com
                            www.fjgrr.org

                          • Aaron Keller
                            Mal, Another question on the trolleys, specifically the Bullets: were they really thin and light, or were they heavier equipment, as in a regular railroad
                            Message 13 of 16 , Apr 27, 2007
                              Mal,

                              Another question on the trolleys, specifically the Bullets: were they
                              really thin and light, or were they "heavier" equipment, as in a regular
                              railroad passenger car?

                              What did the seats look like? What colors were the interior?

                              What did they smell like? What did they sound like?

                              -Aaron


                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: "Malcolm Horton" <mdhorton@...>
                              To: <FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com>
                              Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2007 3:00 PM
                              Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Re: Brill #127


                              Gino,

                              They had to come to a full stop and the motorman had to go out to the back
                              and pull the pole down, using the attached rope, and guide it on to the
                              wire.

                              As a kid, I used to ride my bike down to the Gloversville car barns to see
                              the action. Every car coming in from the Schenectady run was cleaned on the
                              inside, the potty was emptied, The ice and the water was replaced and the
                              car went on to a track pit where the trucks were lubricated. If the trolley
                              pole had come off the wire during the previous trip, it would be bent into
                              a curve cause by it hitting the crossarms which supported the overhead
                              trolley wire. If the pole was bent, it would be removed and straightened.
                              This was done by inserting the bottom end of the pole into a horizontal
                              hole in one of the car barn roof support columns. Several guys on the other
                              end of the pole would push down and rotate the pole until it had been
                              straightened. It would then be reinstalled on the car. There was a vertical
                              storage rack along one wall of the barn for trolley poles. If they didn't
                              have time to straighten a trolley pole, they would grab an already
                              straightened pole from the rack and straighten the bent pole later.

                              Mal
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: Gino's Railpage<mailto:fjgrailroad@...>
                              To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com<mailto:FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com>
                              Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2007 3:30 PM
                              Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Re: Brill #127



                              Mal,

                              Did they stop the Bullet to put the pole on the wire or was this done
                              while still moving?

                              Gino


                              On 4/26/07, Malcolm Horton <mdhorton@...<mailto:mdhorton@...>>
                              wrote:

                              I had the pleasure of riding the Bullets many times from Gloversville
                              to Schenectady. It was a real thrill. They accelerated so smoothly and ran
                              so fast. As I recall the speed was controlled by a foot pedal rather than
                              by the usual controller found in most trolley cars. The brakes had a
                              conventional hand control. On several occasions. the trolley pole jumped
                              off of the wire at high speed, usually between Schenectady and Amsterdam.
                              The emergency, battery operated, internal lights would come on. The
                              motorman then opened the rear door and went outside to place the pole back
                              onto the wire. When this was done the regular lights would come back on and
                              the air compressor would start to recharge the air brake tanks.

                              The cars had a rest room and an ice water spigot for cold drinking
                              water. Paper cups were provided. There was an observation lounge at the
                              rear where one could sit and look out of the rear windows.

                              In 1952, I visited Salt Lake City while on a vacation trip to
                              Yellowstone National Park. I took time out and rode one of the Bullets from
                              Salt Lake to Ogden and back. The motorman said that the cars were about to
                              be replaced by busses. A fire at the Ogden end of the line had destroyed
                              the power house serving the north end of the Bamberger Line. The voltage
                              kept getting lower and lower as we approached Ogden because all of the
                              power was coming up from the Salt Lake end of the line, approximately 70
                              miles away. We made it into Ogden but very slowly.

                              Malcolm Horton


                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: Gino's Railpage<mailto:fjgrailroad@...>
                              To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com <mailto:FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com>
                              Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2007 2:52 PM
                              Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Re: Brill #127



                              I think our own Mal Horton has had the pleasure of riding the
                              Bullets. He may
                              have some other connection also...

                              Gino


                              On 4/26/07, Glenn J. Williams <
                              gjwilliams@...<mailto:gjwilliams@...>> wrote:
                              --- In
                              FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com<mailto:FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com>, "Gino's
                              Railpage" <fjgrailroad@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > OK, I was being diplomatic. I'm PO'd that it isn't being restored
                              to FJ&G
                              > colors.
                              > What really hurt is they painted over the "Fonda Johnstown
                              Gloversville
                              > Schenectady"
                              > under the windows. I've got a photo somewhere of this before they
                              > re-painted over it!
                              >
                              > Yes, it's not my money, but as Paul said, if it weren't for the
                              FJ&G there
                              > wouldn't be Bamberger Bullets!!!
                              >
                              > Gino
                              >

                              Sad but true, Gino. With the 70th anniversary of the Electric
                              Division's demise coming
                              next August, there are few left in our area who remember the
                              Bullets, let alone rode them.

                              In 1956, I discovered that my next-door neighbour's wife - a Utah
                              native - worked for the
                              UP as a turntable operator during WW II and commuted to work on the
                              Bullets. "Went like
                              the wind," was the way she put it. She recalls their being smooth
                              riders, too.

                              BTW, the step platform on the roof for the trolley pole was needed
                              'cuz the wire height out
                              west was higher than was the case on eastern roads. The extra
                              height maintained proper
                              pressure on the wire and also made for easier backup moves.

                              Glenn
                              Penacook, NH







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                              www.fjgrr.org<http://www.fjgrr.org/>








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                            • Malcolm Horton
                              Aaron, I believe that they were much lighter than a regular railroad passenger car. I have ridden on many of the the old Pullman standard cars which had
                              Message 14 of 16 , Apr 27, 2007
                                Aaron,
                                 
                                I believe that they were much lighter than a regular railroad passenger car. I have ridden on many of the the old Pullman standard cars which had "uppers" and "lowers" as well as on the newer Pullmans which had Roomettes. These were much more massive than the Bullets. Somewhere I recall that the Bullets weighed about 20 tons.
                                 
                                As for colors, I am quite color blind so I can't help you there. No particular smell. If they had an odor it was probably caused by the soap that was used in cleaning them. They were quite noiseless. No gear sounds like the Schenectady city trolleys. I do recall that when jogging forward at slow speeds in city traffic, there was a noticeable "bark" of a d-c contactor as it interrupted the current to the motors. Otherwise they had no distinctive sounds.
                                 
                                I can recall that at one Christmas time, my grandmother took for a ride around the Gloversville belt line to see the Christmas lights. I don't recall anything about the lights but I was duly impressed with the trolley car. I would have been about five years old at the time. I had an uncle who lived on North Boulevard in Gloversville and I recall the growl of the gears on the belt line cars as they went past his house. Just as I entered Columbia School as a freshman, they abandoned the belt line trolleys. I was very disappointed.
                                 
                                In later years I observed that the outside lights, at the old Kingsborough railroad station, were wired in groups of five lamps in series, indicating that they had been powered from the 600 volt d-c from the old belt line which passed near by.
                                 
                                Mal Horton    
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                Sent: Friday, April 27, 2007 2:19 PM
                                Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Re: Brill #127

                                Mal,

                                Another question on the trolleys, specifically the Bullets: were they
                                really thin and light, or were they "heavier" equipment, as in a regular
                                railroad passenger car?

                                What did the seats look like? What colors were the interior?

                                What did they smell like? What did they sound like?

                                -Aaron

                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: "Malcolm Horton" <mdhorton@msn. com>
                                To: <FJGRailroad@ yahoogroups. com>
                                Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2007 3:00 PM
                                Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Re: Brill #127

                                Gino,

                                They had to come to a full stop and the motorman had to go out to the back
                                and pull the pole down, using the attached rope, and guide it on to the
                                wire.

                                As a kid, I used to ride my bike down to the Gloversville car barns to see
                                the action. Every car coming in from the Schenectady run was cleaned on the
                                inside, the potty was emptied, The ice and the water was replaced and the
                                car went on to a track pit where the trucks were lubricated. If the trolley
                                pole had come off the wire during the previous trip, it would be bent into
                                a curve cause by it hitting the crossarms which supported the overhead
                                trolley wire. If the pole was bent, it would be removed and straightened.
                                This was done by inserting the bottom end of the pole into a horizontal
                                hole in one of the car barn roof support columns. Several guys on the other
                                end of the pole would push down and rotate the pole until it had been
                                straightened. It would then be reinstalled on the car. There was a vertical
                                storage rack along one wall of the barn for trolley poles. If they didn't
                                have time to straighten a trolley pole, they would grab an already
                                straightened pole from the rack and straighten the bent pole later.

                                Mal
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: Gino's Railpage<mailto:fjgrailroad@ gmail.com>
                                To: FJGRailroad@ yahoogroups. com<mailto:FJGRailroad@ yahoogroups. com>
                                Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2007 3:30 PM
                                Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Re: Brill #127

                                Mal,

                                Did they stop the Bullet to put the pole on the wire or was this done
                                while still moving?

                                Gino

                                On 4/26/07, Malcolm Horton <mdhorton@msn. com<mailto:mdhorton@msn. com>>
                                wrote:

                                I had the pleasure of riding the Bullets many times from Gloversville
                                to Schenectady. It was a real thrill. They accelerated so smoothly and ran
                                so fast. As I recall the speed was controlled by a foot pedal rather than
                                by the usual controller found in most trolley cars. The brakes had a
                                conventional hand control. On several occasions. the trolley pole jumped
                                off of the wire at high speed, usually between Schenectady and Amsterdam.
                                The emergency, battery operated, internal lights would come on. The
                                motorman then opened the rear door and went outside to place the pole back
                                onto the wire. When this was done the regular lights would come back on and
                                the air compressor would start to recharge the air brake tanks.

                                The cars had a rest room and an ice water spigot for cold drinking
                                water. Paper cups were provided. There was an observation lounge at the
                                rear where one could sit and look out of the rear windows.

                                In 1952, I visited Salt Lake City while on a vacation trip to
                                Yellowstone National Park. I took time out and rode one of the Bullets from
                                Salt Lake to Ogden and back. The motorman said that the cars were about to
                                be replaced by busses. A fire at the Ogden end of the line had destroyed
                                the power house serving the north end of the Bamberger Line. The voltage
                                kept getting lower and lower as we approached Ogden because all of the
                                power was coming up from the Salt Lake end of the line, approximately 70
                                miles away. We made it into Ogden but very slowly.

                                Malcolm Horton

                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: Gino's Railpage<mailto:fjgrailroad@ gmail.com>
                                To: FJGRailroad@ yahoogroups. com <mailto:FJGRailroad@ yahoogroups. com>
                                Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2007 2:52 PM
                                Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Re: Brill #127

                                I think our own Mal Horton has had the pleasure of riding the
                                Bullets. He may
                                have some other connection also...

                                Gino

                                On 4/26/07, Glenn J. Williams <
                                gjwilliams@mac. com<mailto:gjwilliams@mac. com>> wrote:
                                --- In
                                FJGRailroad@ yahoogroups. com<mailto:FJGRailroad@ yahoogroups. com>, "Gino's
                                Railpage" <fjgrailroad@ ...> wrote:
                                >
                                > OK, I was being diplomatic. I'm PO'd that it isn't being restored
                                to FJ&G
                                > colors.
                                > What really hurt is they painted over the "Fonda Johnstown
                                Gloversville
                                > Schenectady"
                                > under the windows. I've got a photo somewhere of this before they
                                > re-painted over it!
                                >
                                > Yes, it's not my money, but as Paul said, if it weren't for the
                                FJ&G there
                                > wouldn't be Bamberger Bullets!!!
                                >
                                > Gino
                                >

                                Sad but true, Gino. With the 70th anniversary of the Electric
                                Division's demise coming
                                next August, there are few left in our area who remember the
                                Bullets, let alone rode them.

                                In 1956, I discovered that my next-door neighbour's wife - a Utah
                                native - worked for the
                                UP as a turntable operator during WW II and commuted to work on the
                                Bullets. "Went like
                                the wind," was the way she put it. She recalls their being smooth
                                riders, too.

                                BTW, the step platform on the roof for the trolley pole was needed
                                'cuz the wire height out
                                west was higher than was the case on eastern roads. The extra
                                height maintained proper
                                pressure on the wire and also made for easier backup moves.

                                Glenn
                                Penacook, NH

                                --
                                www.ginosrailpage. com<http://www.ginosrai lpage.com/>
                                www.fjgrr.org<http://www.fjgrr. org/>

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                              • Mike engle
                                Hey all, I wanted to let any interested people know about an internet radio show I started up a couple of months ago called Roadside Radio. I discuss travel
                                Message 15 of 16 , Apr 28, 2007
                                  Hey all,

                                  I wanted to let any interested people know about an internet radio
                                  show I started up a couple of months ago called Roadside Radio. I
                                  discuss travel and tourism ideas, trying to focus on the unique places
                                  to go, and family run food places to eat.
                                  On my show this week, I have an interview with Bob Cudmore, talking
                                  about Amsterdam, and a couple of places to eat in Amsterdam that are
                                  local places. I had hoped to get the Tourism Director for the County,
                                  but I'm not sure if we'll connect before the show.
                                  Also have Gary Thomas who wrote a book on "Diners of the North
                                  Shore" (in Massachusetts)

                                  The show is on live every Tuesday at 7:30pm EST
                                  www.blogtalkradio.com/nydiners or an easier link to remember is
                                  roadsideradio.com and you're only two clicks away. You can also
                                  listen to back shows anytime. Even cooler, is you can call in. So if
                                  you wanted to mention some place in the Fulton Montgomery area (or
                                  really, anywhere in the country) the number is given at the start of
                                  the show, AND on the website.

                                  -Mike Engle
                                • Gino's Railpage
                                  Good luck Mike. Being a former radio person this sounds pretty neat to me! Bob Cudmore was my broadcast speaking professor during my senio year at college.
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Apr 28, 2007
                                    Good luck Mike.  Being a former radio person this sounds pretty neat to me!
                                    Bob Cudmore was my broadcast speaking professor during my senio year
                                    at college.  Very nice guy.  He has also written some great articles about
                                    the FJ&G in Amsterdam...
                                     
                                    Gino

                                     
                                    On 4/28/07, Mike engle <speigletown@...> wrote:

                                    Hey all,

                                    I wanted to let any interested people know about an internet radio
                                    show I started up a couple of months ago called Roadside Radio. I
                                    discuss travel and tourism ideas, trying to focus on the unique places
                                    to go, and family run food places to eat.
                                    On my show this week, I have an interview with Bob Cudmore, talking
                                    about Amsterdam, and a couple of places to eat in Amsterdam that are
                                    local places. I had hoped to get the Tourism Director for the County,
                                    but I'm not sure if we'll connect before the show.
                                    Also have Gary Thomas who wrote a book on "Diners of the North
                                    Shore" (in Massachusetts)

                                    The show is on live every Tuesday at 7:30pm EST
                                    www.blogtalkradio.com/nydiners or an easier link to remember is
                                    roadsideradio.com and you're only two clicks away. You can also
                                    listen to back shows anytime. Even cooler, is you can call in. So if
                                    you wanted to mention some place in the Fulton Montgomery area (or
                                    really, anywhere in the country) the number is given at the start of
                                    the show, AND on the website.

                                    -Mike Engle




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