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A couple of questions.

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  • Paul Charland
    Hi People, I had a few questions that I thought I would post, and if you know the answers then post them for all to see, and learn. 1: After looking at
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 15, 1999
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      Hi People,

      I had a few questions that I thought I would post, and if you know the
      answers then post them for all to see, and learn.

      1: After looking at different railroad employee's time tables, the
      best guess for the tonnage ratings for the FJ&G S-2's that I have been
      able to come up with are;

      600 to 615 tons uphill
      660 to 675 tons downhill
      5% less in "bad track conditions" (rain, snow, and below
      freezing)

      Does anyone know the actual tonnage ratings for the S-2's?

      2: On railpage 9 of Gino's FJ&G website, there is a picture from a
      postcard taken on November 4, 1958. The picture shows a three car
      freight ready to head off to Broadilbin. The caboose on the tailend is
      an ORANGE job. It looks to be an ex-PRR N-4 of some subclass. Can
      anyone I.D. this caboose?

      3: I have a 1954 FJ&G Employee's Time Table (which I will be
      sending to the group as soon as I can find out how!). If you look at
      the arrival time of the first freight at Fonda, and the time of the
      first freight out of Fonda, there is only enough time to cut your train,
      run-around our caboose, put it on the cars going north and get out of
      there. Was there a yard job in Fonda in �54? If not, then when did
      they have time to weigh cars, or just make up a train?

      4: I have seen a set of pictures that were taken of #20 in 1978.
      This is what I used to model #20 back about ten years ago. Among the
      five or so differences between #20 and #21 (most were paint details),
      the stack on #20 was very unusual. For lack of a better description,
      the stack on #21 was the common HOOD-TAPER-TUBE design, while #20 had a
      HOOD-BOX-TAPER. Originally I thought this was ALCO's attempt at an
      early water cooled design, but after seeing in Gino's collection that
      the #20 originally had the common stack, I knew that I was wrong.
      Anyone know the story on this stack and when the thing was modified?

      I have lots more questions, but I'll leave them for a later date. For
      now,

      Paul Charland
    • Glenn Williams
      ... harlie@xxxxxxxxx.xxx ... At that time, there were two scheduled NYC freights which I can recall doing pickups/dropoffs at the Fonda yard: westbound VD75
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 17, 2000
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        --- In FJGRailroad@egroups.com, Paul Charland <p.c
        harlie@...
        wrote:
        > [material snipped]
        > 3: I have a 1954 FJ&G Employee's Time Table (which I will be
        > sending to the group as soon as I can find out how!). If you look
        > at the arrival time of the first freight at Fonda, and the time of
        > the first freight out of Fonda, there is only enough time to cut
        > your train, run-around our caboose, put it on the cars going north
        > and get out of there. Was there a yard job in Fonda in `54?
        > If not, then when did they have time to weigh cars, or just make up
        > a train?
        > [material snipped]
        > Paul Charland

        At that time, there were two scheduled NYC freights which I can
        recall doing pickups/dropoffs at the Fonda yard: westbound VD75 and
        eastbound DV4. For a while, an NYC SW1 was based there to do the
        work. I do recall seeing it there in the very late 50s and into '60.

        Anyone have an NYC connection to get other details? There was often
        a late night NYC run into Fonda, and it inevitably would arrive and
        begin its not-so-quiet couplings just as I was going to bed. My
        family always referred to it as the Upper Prospect Street switcher.

        Glenn
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