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FW: RE: [dandh] Re: From the Archives

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  • joseph Klapkowski
    I am forwadring this from the D&H list because it is directly connected to the Sperry Rail discussion.
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 4, 2006
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      I am forwadring this from the D&H list because it is directly connected to
      the Sperry Rail discussion.

      >From: "joseph Klapkowski" <riverlinejoe@...>
      >Reply-To: dandh@yahoogroups.com
      >To: dandh@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: RE: [dandh] Re: From the Archives
      >Date: Sat, 04 Mar 2006 16:28:44 +0000
      >
      >I enjoyed the technical explaination. It was a long time ago for basically
      >a
      >few months. I had a great time. Ivan could be, well tough but that was the
      >old school in those days. To tell the truth I didn't think he was such a
      >bad
      >guy. Except for the first night when he told me to get out of his rom. He
      >was mad.
      >
      >The thing about the Sperry Car is it is an thing you have to do. I can tell
      >you about the paint pot but until you do it you don't have a feel for how
      >much paint and how much diesel. I could explain lowering the brushes so
      >they
      >are all the same height but doing it is so much more instructional. I just
      >took Ivan at his word and did what I was told. I was 19 and it was one of
      >my
      >first real heavy jobs. Cutting grass and driving a cab just do not seem to
      >compare (although being held up or dealing with an unruly drunk is another
      >personality shaping experience).
      >
      >There are literally dozens of chores to learn on the Sperry Car. The LAST
      >one is learning how to test. You have to learn all the other tasks first. I
      >donot know what the key to testing the rail is. I had to use the magic
      >wand.
      >Ivan could literally look at it standing up and tell you what the defect
      >was.
      >
      >One day he says, "Junior, look under the fillet of that rail". I bend over
      >and look up and he says" there is a rust streak running from here to here"
      >which was about six feet. "yeah" I replied. The head of that rail is
      >completely seperate from the web. If we hit it with a hammer it qwould flal
      >right off". That defect in particular he made the railroad guy change on
      >the
      >spot. He usually never did that but that one he made them change.
      >I have rambled on here. Will save the rest for the next edition which I
      >think is number 8.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > >From: "Gordon Davids" <g.davids@...>
      > >Reply-To: dandh@yahoogroups.com
      > >To: dandh@yahoogroups.com
      > >Subject: [dandh] Re: From the Archives
      > >Date: Fri, 03 Mar 2006 22:12:51 -0000
      > >
      > >Oh, yes, Joe. This is good stuff.
      > >
      > >I spent lots of time with Ivan Owen and Jimmy Langdon - I was the RR
      > >guy on the car, on the NYC, D&H and EL. One night in April 1966 I
      > >piloted Ivan running light over the New York Central from Cleveland to
      > >Buffalo, after he had come up the N&W from Portsmouth to Belleview, OH
      > >and over the NYC to Cleveland. That was a long day for them - I think
      > >we got into Buffalo around midnight. It was Ivan's first trip when he
      > >returned to work after his car had been clobbered by a train on the
      > >Boston and Maine. It was the railroad's fault.
      > >
      > >I took the 140 car over the entire D&H in the late fall of 1966, its
      > >first revenue operation after it was built. Ivan was on the car,
      > >along with Charlie Kennedy and Bob McQuire. Ivan took over the car as
      > >the Chief after the shakedown, and I made several more trips with him
      > >on the D&H and Erie Lackawanna. I watched him ride his Asst.
      > >Operators ("Stooges" in Sperryspeak) and I have to hand it to anyone
      > >who lasted out the first week on one of Ivan's cars.
      > >
      > >The 140 was a standard IRT car from NYC Transit, built for Sperry by
      > >St. Louis Car Co. as one of a NYCTA order. It was the first diesel
      > >Sperry car, with one Cat engine to power both the traction and testing
      > >systems. Before that, all the cars had two Winton gasoline engines,
      > >one for traction, mounted crossways right behind the "engineman's"
      > >seat, and one lengthwise in the middle of the car for testing power.
      > >The heat and noise from those engines could be edging on unbearable.
      > >We also had the problem of finding a supplier of gasoline by the
      > >truckload at night, not always very easy. After the cars were
      > >converted to diesel, it was much easier to find diesel fuel for them.
      > >
      > >In the winter, when the rail was cold, you couldn't use water for a
      > >couplant with the Reflectoscope (hand test) crystals. You had to use
      > >kerosene, and everyone would be stinking from it at the end of the day.
      > >
      > >All the Sperry guys were full of horror stories about the lousy
      > >handling they had gotten on other railroads, and from our discussions
      > >I found that they considered the D&H to be one of the best railroads
      > >that they tested, as far as getting over the road and having their
      > >needs tended to.
      > >
      > >Keep it coming, Joe. I hope you didn't mind me getting techical on
      > >you last week.
      > >
      > >Gordon
      > >
      > >--- In dandh@yahoogroups.com, "joseph Klapkowski" <riverlinejoe@...>
      > >wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I can not keep this up nigth after night.........the Pinewood derby is
      > > > coming and I have a work project and a couple of evening engagements
      > >coming
      > > > up. Several of you have offered encouragement with this "project".
      > >Is there
      > > > anyone else out there who wants to hear more ?
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
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