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Re: [FJGRailroad] Northville Line

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  • Paul Charland
    Hi Paul and All, If you look at this TerraServer map you will see a narrow bit jutting into the water just to the left of the words Great Sacandaga Lake , is
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 18, 2005
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      Hi Paul and All,

      If you look at this TerraServer map you will see a narrow bit jutting
      into the water just to the left of the words "Great Sacandaga Lake", is
      this the remains of the FJ&G right of way?

      http://terraserver-usa.com/image.aspx?T=2&S=12&Z=18&X=699&Y=5964&W=3&qs=%7cgloversville%7c%7c

      This appears to be the area that was flooded and if this is the right
      of way, did it reappear out of the flooded area just to the east of
      Cranberry Creek just below the "North" link at the top center of this map?

      http://terraserver-usa.com/image.aspx?T=2&S=12&Z=18&X=705&Y=5971&W=3&qs=%7cgloversville%7c%7c

      I was able to follow what appeared to be an abandoned right of way from
      Broadalbin Junction to the narrow part in the first link and picked it
      up again in the second link in the aerial shots.

      Paul :-)

      paul larner wrote:
      > When originally built the railroad did bypass Mayfield, deliberately. The
      > preferred route would have been into Mayfield village but the good citizens
      > of Mayfield refused to put up any money for the road. Hence the line went
      > east or south aroung the village. The curve at Dennie's could have as
      > easily run the line a little higher toward Mayfield as it did down into the
      > Vley. The grade coming south was long and hard on the engines. Usual speed
      > southbound rarely exceeded thirty five. Pushers were often used on the
      > trains out of Northville. Northhampton did fund the railroad to the tune of
      > a $100,000 bond issue which nearly all lost; the stockholders lost
      > everything. The memory of this loss cost the railroad significant
      > controversy after the abandonment of the rail line. The town of Northampton
      > wanted nothing to do with the railroad, refusing them a franchise to operate
      > passenger busses in the town.. The consequence was the railroad busses
      > could carry passengers only as far and from Cranberry Creek. Here they
      > transferred to a bus operated by a more favored company. The FJ&G busses
      > continued into Sacandaga and Northville with the mail and express but no
      > passengers. The issue was shortly resolved, common sense contributing to an
      > amicable settlement. The company published one timetable showing service
      > only to Cranberry Creek, effective March 16, 1930. The railroads's
      > original route was a product of who and how much. The original drawings of
      > the route, from 1872, still exist. The Gloversville city drawing I believe
      > I put in the files section several years back.
      >
      > The Park or Campground, at the time of construction, was acquired by Heacock
      > in his own name before the road was completed. The placement of the
      > railroad had to do with the distance and bridging the Sacandaga. The Park
      > developed gradually between the railroad and the river. Heacock acquired
      > an easement so people using the campground, which he owned, could access the
      > river. The hotel (not the first "hotel" but the first real hotel) wasn't
      > built until 1891, nor was the entire area referred to as Sacandaga Park
      > actually under railroad possession until shortly into the twentieth century.
      > Several people owned their own hotels and bars at Sacandaga Park. The
      > name was not exclusive to the railroad. Not to understate that the
      > railroad's existence was the reason for the popularity of the area which
      > otherwise would have remained among a small group of Methodists.
      >
      > It wasn't until several years after the railroad started running excursions
      > to the campground, with several dozen shelters (camps or shacks) having been
      > constructed, that the land owners decided to give their little piece of
      > summer comfort the Sacandaga Park name. Beyond almost daily (except Sunday)
      > summer excursion trips, the real growth of the Park as a day trip
      > destination followed the fire of 1898, which conveniently eliminated 110 of
      > the "inferior" cottages. The middle years of the gay nineties were lean
      > years for the railroad, actually the only red ink years since construction.
      > This probably had more to do with the second company using the FJ&G to bail
      > out the Cayadutta's expenses and poor construction, than the economic crisis
      > following the crash of 1893, which was devastating to many of the city's
      > glove businesses. In 1897 the management made plans to create the Park as
      > we recall it, from in its heyday. This heyday didn't last twenty years from
      > the railroad's perspective. Erosion commencing with the completion of the
      > paved highway (off the top of my head) around 1911.
      >
      > The line once platted away from Mayfield and around the rise of land was
      > direct to the west shore of the Sacandaga, across from Northville. There is
      > minimum curvature but considerable grade on both side or the crossing at
      > Gifford's corners. There was no station building at the campground, simply
      > a platform. A call from the populace for a shelter in inclement weather
      > resulted in teh first building erected in the mid nineties, after the hotel.
      >
      > Though a very few errors are found in the story, the best I have found of
      > the Park so far, is in John J. Bennis history of the town of Northampton,
      > "Northampton, A Town Nearly Drowned". Write to the town clerk who may be
      > able to locate one for you. They were privately produced, probably like my
      > book will be, whenever, and hard to find. I had to search several places to
      > find one. The gentleman is elderly, I believe if he is still alive, lives
      > in Schenectady. Suppose you could look it up and call him.
      >
      > PKL
    • paul larner
      Hello Paul, The spit of land into Mayfield lake is the old right of way. At Cranberry Creek follow the road east past the church and go straight into the lake
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 18, 2005
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        Hello Paul,

        The spit of land into Mayfield lake is the old right of way. At Cranberry
        Creek follow the road east past the church and go straight into the lake
        rather than making the left turn. That is the route of the original road;
        the station would be south of the road at about the middle of that small
        bay.

        THe aerial shots show the line between CC and the Park, a line no longer
        visible from the highway as scrub has filled in the formerly open fields.

        PKL


        >From: Paul Charland <p.charlie@...>
        >Reply-To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
        >To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: Re: [FJGRailroad] Northville Line
        >Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2005 20:33:43 -0500
        >
        >Hi Paul and All,
        >
        >If you look at this TerraServer map you will see a narrow bit jutting
        >into the water just to the left of the words "Great Sacandaga Lake", is
        >this the remains of the FJ&G right of way?
        >
        >http://terraserver-usa.com/image.aspx?T=2&S=12&Z=18&X=699&Y=5964&W=3&qs=%7cgloversville%7c%7c
        >
        > This appears to be the area that was flooded and if this is the right
        >of way, did it reappear out of the flooded area just to the east of
        >Cranberry Creek just below the "North" link at the top center of this map?
        >
        >http://terraserver-usa.com/image.aspx?T=2&S=12&Z=18&X=705&Y=5971&W=3&qs=%7cgloversville%7c%7c
        >
        >I was able to follow what appeared to be an abandoned right of way from
        >Broadalbin Junction to the narrow part in the first link and picked it
        >up again in the second link in the aerial shots.
        >
        >Paul :-)
        >
        >paul larner wrote:
        > > When originally built the railroad did bypass Mayfield, deliberately.
        >The
        > > preferred route would have been into Mayfield village but the good
        >citizens
        > > of Mayfield refused to put up any money for the road. Hence the line
        >went
        > > east or south aroung the village. The curve at Dennie's could have as
        > > easily run the line a little higher toward Mayfield as it did down into
        >the
        > > Vley. The grade coming south was long and hard on the engines. Usual
        >speed
        > > southbound rarely exceeded thirty five. Pushers were often used on the
        > > trains out of Northville. Northhampton did fund the railroad to the
        >tune of
        > > a $100,000 bond issue which nearly all lost; the stockholders lost
        > > everything. The memory of this loss cost the railroad significant
        > > controversy after the abandonment of the rail line. The town of
        >Northampton
        > > wanted nothing to do with the railroad, refusing them a franchise to
        >operate
        > > passenger busses in the town.. The consequence was the railroad busses
        > > could carry passengers only as far and from Cranberry Creek. Here they
        > > transferred to a bus operated by a more favored company. The FJ&G
        >busses
        > > continued into Sacandaga and Northville with the mail and express but no
        > > passengers. The issue was shortly resolved, common sense contributing
        >to an
        > > amicable settlement. The company published one timetable showing
        >service
        > > only to Cranberry Creek, effective March 16, 1930. The railroads's
        > > original route was a product of who and how much. The original drawings
        >of
        > > the route, from 1872, still exist. The Gloversville city drawing I
        >believe
        > > I put in the files section several years back.
        > >
        > > The Park or Campground, at the time of construction, was acquired by
        >Heacock
        > > in his own name before the road was completed. The placement of the
        > > railroad had to do with the distance and bridging the Sacandaga. The
        >Park
        > > developed gradually between the railroad and the river. Heacock
        >acquired
        > > an easement so people using the campground, which he owned, could access
        >the
        > > river. The hotel (not the first "hotel" but the first real hotel)
        >wasn't
        > > built until 1891, nor was the entire area referred to as Sacandaga Park
        > > actually under railroad possession until shortly into the twentieth
        >century.
        > > Several people owned their own hotels and bars at Sacandaga Park. The
        > > name was not exclusive to the railroad. Not to understate that the
        > > railroad's existence was the reason for the popularity of the area which
        > > otherwise would have remained among a small group of Methodists.
        > >
        > > It wasn't until several years after the railroad started running
        >excursions
        > > to the campground, with several dozen shelters (camps or shacks) having
        >been
        > > constructed, that the land owners decided to give their little piece of
        > > summer comfort the Sacandaga Park name. Beyond almost daily (except
        >Sunday)
        > > summer excursion trips, the real growth of the Park as a day trip
        > > destination followed the fire of 1898, which conveniently eliminated 110
        >of
        > > the "inferior" cottages. The middle years of the gay nineties were lean
        > > years for the railroad, actually the only red ink years since
        >construction.
        > > This probably had more to do with the second company using the FJ&G to
        >bail
        > > out the Cayadutta's expenses and poor construction, than the economic
        >crisis
        > > following the crash of 1893, which was devastating to many of the city's
        > > glove businesses. In 1897 the management made plans to create the Park
        >as
        > > we recall it, from in its heyday. This heyday didn't last twenty years
        >from
        > > the railroad's perspective. Erosion commencing with the completion of
        >the
        > > paved highway (off the top of my head) around 1911.
        > >
        > > The line once platted away from Mayfield and around the rise of land was
        > > direct to the west shore of the Sacandaga, across from Northville.
        >There is
        > > minimum curvature but considerable grade on both side or the crossing at
        > > Gifford's corners. There was no station building at the campground,
        >simply
        > > a platform. A call from the populace for a shelter in inclement weather
        > > resulted in teh first building erected in the mid nineties, after the
        >hotel.
        > >
        > > Though a very few errors are found in the story, the best I have found
        >of
        > > the Park so far, is in John J. Bennis history of the town of
        >Northampton,
        > > "Northampton, A Town Nearly Drowned". Write to the town clerk who may
        >be
        > > able to locate one for you. They were privately produced, probably like
        >my
        > > book will be, whenever, and hard to find. I had to search several
        >places to
        > > find one. The gentleman is elderly, I believe if he is still alive,
        >lives
        > > in Schenectady. Suppose you could look it up and call him.
        > >
        > > PKL
      • Paul Charland
        Hi Paul, I ll try to collect all the aerial shots tomorrow and stitch the route together. Paul :-)
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 18, 2005
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          Hi Paul,

          I'll try to collect all the aerial shots tomorrow and stitch the route
          together.

          Paul :-)

          paul larner wrote:
          > Hello Paul,
          >
          > The spit of land into Mayfield lake is the old right of way. At Cranberry
          > Creek follow the road east past the church and go straight into the lake
          > rather than making the left turn. That is the route of the original road;
          > the station would be south of the road at about the middle of that small
          > bay.
          >
          > THe aerial shots show the line between CC and the Park, a line no longer
          > visible from the highway as scrub has filled in the formerly open fields.
          >
          > PKL
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