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RE: [FJGRailroad] Sketches of Sacandaga Park

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  • Dicarlo, Gino
    Saul, It usually falls under Sacandaga Park. Gino ... From: Saul Kalbfeld [mailto:fjgbus@comcast.net] Sent: Wednesday, March 02, 2005 5:16 PM To:
    Message 1 of 16 , Mar 3, 2005
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      Message
      Saul,
       
      It usually falls under "Sacandaga Park."
       
      Gino
      -----Original Message-----
      From: Saul Kalbfeld [mailto:fjgbus@...]
      Sent: Wednesday, March 02, 2005 5:16 PM
      To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [FJGRailroad] Sketches of Sacandaga Park

      Richard,
      What catagory was the book listed under in E-bay, and if you care to say, what was the item number? Gee, I could scan mine to save the pictures and turn up some $$$ for my model railroad.
      Saul

    • Dicarlo, Gino
      I was riding my scooter down Maple Ave. once and there was a hopper truck going to the glue factory. I kid you not, there was all sorts of animal-debris flying
      Message 2 of 16 , Mar 3, 2005
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        Message
        I was riding my scooter down Maple Ave. once and there was a hopper truck going to the glue factory.
        I kid you not, there was all sorts of animal-debris flying out of the truck and I was dodging it.  That was
        the last time I rode down Maple Ave. when not in an automobile!
         
        I remember when I first moved to Gloversville.  My friends and I would go to Perry Lanes and I'd be asking
        who passed gas.  I couldn't believe that there could be a smell like that sitting in the middle of town.  I
        think Kargs smelled worse though!
         
        Gino
        -----Original Message-----
        From: paul larner [mailto:pklarner@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, March 01, 2005 7:59 PM
        To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [FJGRailroad] Milligan & Higgins


        It appears they are very much in business at the Maple Avenue site
        Johnstown.  And they still have an odor problem.  Of course years ago noone
        who could do otherwise would buy land near a glue factory, tannery, railyard
        or wetland.  Today, the land is bought cheap, the house is built, then you
        go to council then court to close down the industry because it is ruining
        your property value..

        If you do a google search for ["Milligan & Higgins" glue] you will develop a
        healthy respect for what the company does.  They are the only manufacturers
        of hide glue in North America; considered the foremost experts on hide glue.

        It was an interesting education on the uses of their product.

        PKL

      • mwilber@webtv.net
        There was nothing worse when lived on Broad St.,sitting down for dinner and breathing the odor from the tanneries on a hot day. Mark
        Message 3 of 16 , Mar 3, 2005
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          There was nothing worse when lived on Broad St.,sitting down for dinner
          and breathing the odor from the tanneries on a hot day. Mark
        • paul larner
          You would perhaps have found the worse place in Wesbrook Maine where Scott Paper had a sulfite mill. Or almost as bad today is the Ticonderoga mill in upstate
          Message 4 of 16 , Mar 3, 2005
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            You would perhaps have found the worse place in Wesbrook Maine where Scott
            Paper had a sulfite mill. Or almost as bad today is the Ticonderoga mill in
            upstate NY. These mills are the lifeblood of their regions. If you're well
            off, build or buy your home some where else. You can still work there with
            modern transit (horse cars and trolleys initially). Only those who must
            lived near the mills. Why do folks want to drive these jobs away? The
            worst spot I can recall in the Gloversville/Johnstown area was Townsend Ave,
            near the Cayadutta Creek bridge. People actually lived in homes near the
            creek. I suppose it was the best they could afford. Too many people who
            have made it (or had it given to them or marry it) overlook these folks.
            This was an era before the welfare systems of sixties emerged. Today
            everyone is entitled to a nice home with a nice view.

            That's narrow, I know, OSHA and the EPA need to control the pollution that
            resulted in these conditions. That's when the properties started to regain
            value. Townsend Ave and the Broad Street (West end) of Gloversville are
            much bette today without Levor's and the rest of the leather industry that
            lessed the city with jobs and prosperity. Yes there were other issues.

            The Cayadutta was a sewer for the industry from the north end of
            Gloversville to the Mohawk. Nowhere along its banks were the homes more
            than marginal in value, just because of the stink. Those least able to
            lived in homes along the creek. Some different today.

            PKL




            >From: mwilber@...
            >Reply-To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
            >To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: RE: [FJGRailroad] Milligan & Higgins
            >Date: Thu, 3 Mar 2005 07:36:49 -0500
            >
            >There was nothing worse when lived on Broad St.,sitting down for dinner
            >and breathing the odor from the tanneries on a hot day. Mark
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Dicarlo, Gino
            What the heck was on Harrison Street in Gloversville that stunk so much? If you went to Parkhurst Field in the summer you would gag. I was told there Was a
            Message 5 of 16 , Mar 3, 2005
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              What the heck was on Harrison Street in Gloversville that stunk so much?
              If you went to Parkhurst Field in the summer you would gag. I was told
              there
              Was a sewage plant around there somewhere, but never noticed one. I
              don't
              Recall the Hair-Mill stinking...

              Gino

              -----Original Message-----
              From: paul larner [mailto:pklarner@...]
              Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2005 9:03 AM
              To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [FJGRailroad] Milligan & Higgins



              You would perhaps have found the worse place in Wesbrook Maine where
              Scott
              Paper had a sulfite mill. Or almost as bad today is the Ticonderoga
              mill in
              upstate NY. These mills are the lifeblood of their regions. If you're
              well
              off, build or buy your home some where else. You can still work there
              with
              modern transit (horse cars and trolleys initially). Only those who must

              lived near the mills. Why do folks want to drive these jobs away? The

              worst spot I can recall in the Gloversville/Johnstown area was Townsend
              Ave,
              near the Cayadutta Creek bridge. People actually lived in homes near
              the
              creek. I suppose it was the best they could afford. Too many people
              who
              have made it (or had it given to them or marry it) overlook these folks.

              This was an era before the welfare systems of sixties emerged. Today
              everyone is entitled to a nice home with a nice view.

              That's narrow, I know, OSHA and the EPA need to control the pollution
              that
              resulted in these conditions. That's when the properties started to
              regain
              value. Townsend Ave and the Broad Street (West end) of Gloversville are

              much bette today without Levor's and the rest of the leather industry
              that
              lessed the city with jobs and prosperity. Yes there were other issues.

              The Cayadutta was a sewer for the industry from the north end of
              Gloversville to the Mohawk. Nowhere along its banks were the homes more

              than marginal in value, just because of the stink. Those least able to
              lived in homes along the creek. Some different today.

              PKL
            • fjg1870
              ... wrote: What the heck was on Harrison Street in Gloversville that stunk so much? If you went to Parkhurst Field in the summer you would
              Message 6 of 16 , Mar 3, 2005
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                --- In FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com, "Dicarlo, Gino"
                <Gino.Dicarlo@q...> wrote:
                What the heck was on Harrison Street in Gloversville that stunk so
                much? If you went to Parkhurst Field in the summer you would gag. I
                was told there was a sewage plant around there somewhere, but never
                noticed one.

                I lived on Harrison Street in the late 1940s. Yes there was a sewage
                plant on Harrision Street, it was about where the former Ni-Mo
                building is. My father used to call it the "rose factory". On a hot
                summer night the spell was something else. We moved from Harrision
                Street after having lived there about a year.

                Walt
              • paul larner
                The Gloversville Sewage treatment plant and settling beds were on the east sode of the tracks. The plant was on the side of Harrison St. and the beds on teh
                Message 7 of 16 , Mar 4, 2005
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                  The Gloversville Sewage treatment plant and settling beds were on the east
                  sode of the tracks. The plant was on the side of Harrison St. and the beds
                  on teh south side. The plant was set back and the grounds looked a bit
                  park like. The stink probably came from the Parkhurst Hair mill or the
                  creek or perhaps from Lee Dying on South Main st. Lee had their own siding
                  from about the location of the former Starr's station. On hot summer days
                  the sewage plant beds were ripe.
                  PKL


                  >From: "Dicarlo, Gino" <Gino.Dicarlo@...>
                  >Reply-To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
                  >To: <FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com>
                  >Subject: RE: [FJGRailroad] Milligan & Higgins
                  >Date: Thu, 3 Mar 2005 10:11:36 -0600
                  >
                  >What the heck was on Harrison Street in Gloversville that stunk so much?
                  >If you went to Parkhurst Field in the summer you would gag. I was told
                  >there
                  >Was a sewage plant around there somewhere, but never noticed one. I
                  >don't
                  >Recall the Hair-Mill stinking...
                  >
                  >Gino
                  >
                  >-----Original Message-----
                  >From: paul larner [mailto:pklarner@...]
                  >Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2005 9:03 AM
                  >To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
                  >Subject: RE: [FJGRailroad] Milligan & Higgins
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >You would perhaps have found the worse place in Wesbrook Maine where
                  >Scott
                  >Paper had a sulfite mill. Or almost as bad today is the Ticonderoga
                  >mill in
                  >upstate NY. These mills are the lifeblood of their regions. If you're
                  >well
                  >off, build or buy your home some where else. You can still work there
                  >with
                  >modern transit (horse cars and trolleys initially). Only those who must
                  >
                  >lived near the mills. Why do folks want to drive these jobs away? The
                  >
                  >worst spot I can recall in the Gloversville/Johnstown area was Townsend
                  >Ave,
                  >near the Cayadutta Creek bridge. People actually lived in homes near
                  >the
                  >creek. I suppose it was the best they could afford. Too many people
                  >who
                  >have made it (or had it given to them or marry it) overlook these folks.
                  >
                  >This was an era before the welfare systems of sixties emerged. Today
                  >everyone is entitled to a nice home with a nice view.
                  >
                  >That's narrow, I know, OSHA and the EPA need to control the pollution
                  >that
                  >resulted in these conditions. That's when the properties started to
                  >regain
                  >value. Townsend Ave and the Broad Street (West end) of Gloversville are
                  >
                  >much bette today without Levor's and the rest of the leather industry
                  >that
                  >lessed the city with jobs and prosperity. Yes there were other issues.
                  >
                  >The Cayadutta was a sewer for the industry from the north end of
                  >Gloversville to the Mohawk. Nowhere along its banks were the homes more
                  >
                  >than marginal in value, just because of the stink. Those least able to
                  >lived in homes along the creek. Some different today.
                  >
                  >PKL
                  >
                  >
                • MD Horton
                  Residents in the Harrison street area always knew which way the wind was blowing. MDH ... From: paul larner [SMTP:pklarner@hotmail.com] Sent: Friday, March 04,
                  Message 8 of 16 , Mar 6, 2005
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                    Residents in the Harrison street area always knew which way the wind was blowing.

                    MDH

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: paul larner [SMTP:pklarner@...]
                    Sent: Friday, March 04, 2005 11:41 PM
                    To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [FJGRailroad] Milligan & Higgins


                    The Gloversville Sewage treatment plant and settling beds were on the east
                    sode of the tracks. The plant was on the side of Harrison St. and the beds
                    on teh south side. The plant was set back and the grounds looked a bit
                    park like. The stink probably came from the Parkhurst Hair mill or the
                    creek or perhaps from Lee Dying on South Main st. Lee had their own siding
                    from about the location of the former Starr's station. On hot summer days
                    the sewage plant beds were ripe.
                    PKL


                    >From: "Dicarlo, Gino" <Gino.Dicarlo@...>
                    >Reply-To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
                    >To: <FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com>
                    >Subject: RE: [FJGRailroad] Milligan & Higgins
                    >Date: Thu, 3 Mar 2005 10:11:36 -0600
                    >
                    >What the heck was on Harrison Street in Gloversville that stunk so much?
                    >If you went to Parkhurst Field in the summer you would gag. I was told
                    >there
                    >Was a sewage plant around there somewhere, but never noticed one. I
                    >don't
                    >Recall the Hair-Mill stinking...
                    >
                    >Gino
                    >
                    >-----Original Message-----
                    >From: paul larner [mailto:pklarner@...]
                    >Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2005 9:03 AM
                    >To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
                    >Subject: RE: [FJGRailroad] Milligan & Higgins
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >You would perhaps have found the worse place in Wesbrook Maine where
                    >Scott
                    >Paper had a sulfite mill. Or almost as bad today is the Ticonderoga
                    >mill in
                    >upstate NY. These mills are the lifeblood of their regions. If you're
                    >well
                    >off, build or buy your home some where else. You can still work there
                    >with
                    >modern transit (horse cars and trolleys initially). Only those who must
                    >
                    >lived near the mills. Why do folks want to drive these jobs away? The
                    >
                    >worst spot I can recall in the Gloversville/Johnstown area was Townsend
                    >Ave,
                    >near the Cayadutta Creek bridge. People actually lived in homes near
                    >the
                    >creek. I suppose it was the best they could afford. Too many people
                    >who
                    >have made it (or had it given to them or marry it) overlook these folks.
                    >
                    >This was an era before the welfare systems of sixties emerged. Today
                    >everyone is entitled to a nice home with a nice view.
                    >
                    >That's narrow, I know, OSHA and the EPA need to control the pollution
                    >that
                    >resulted in these conditions. That's when the properties started to
                    >regain
                    >value. Townsend Ave and the Broad Street (West end) of Gloversville are
                    >
                    >much bette today without Levor's and the rest of the leather industry
                    >that
                    >lessed the city with jobs and prosperity. Yes there were other issues.
                    >
                    >The Cayadutta was a sewer for the industry from the north end of
                    >Gloversville to the Mohawk. Nowhere along its banks were the homes more
                    >
                    >than marginal in value, just because of the stink. Those least able to
                    >lived in homes along the creek. Some different today.
                    >
                    >PKL
                    >
                    >





                    Visit Gino's Railpage at
                    http://www.ginosrailpage.com and http://fjgrr.org
                    Visit The Greater Capital District Railfan Assocation at http://gcdranet.homelinux.com/
                    Visit Pete Seftons Lost Landmark Page
                    http://www.lostlandmarks.org
                    Visit Charles P. Woolever's Existing Railroad Stations in New York State at
                    http://ny.existingstations.com/
                    Yahoo! Groups Links
                  • Dick Ryall
                    ... The sewage disposal plant, Harrison St. had an oder of its own..........
                    Message 9 of 16 , Mar 14, 2005
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                      Dicarlo, Gino wrote:

                      >What the heck was on Harrison Street in Gloversville that stunk so much?
                      >If you went to Parkhurst Field in the summer you would gag. I was told
                      >there
                      >Was a sewage plant around there somewhere, but never noticed one. I
                      >don't
                      >Recall the Hair-Mill stinking...
                      >
                      >Gino
                      >
                      >-----Original Message-----
                      >From: paul larner [mailto:pklarner@...]
                      >Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2005 9:03 AM
                      >To: FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com
                      >Subject: RE: [FJGRailroad] Milligan & Higgins
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >You would perhaps have found the worse place in Wesbrook Maine where
                      >Scott
                      >Paper had a sulfite mill. Or almost as bad today is the Ticonderoga
                      >mill in
                      >upstate NY. These mills are the lifeblood of their regions. If you're
                      >well
                      >off, build or buy your home some where else. You can still work there
                      >with
                      >modern transit (horse cars and trolleys initially). Only those who must
                      >
                      >lived near the mills. Why do folks want to drive these jobs away? The
                      >
                      >worst spot I can recall in the Gloversville/Johnstown area was Townsend
                      >Ave,
                      >near the Cayadutta Creek bridge. People actually lived in homes near
                      >the
                      >creek. I suppose it was the best they could afford. Too many people
                      >who
                      >have made it (or had it given to them or marry it) overlook these folks.
                      >
                      >This was an era before the welfare systems of sixties emerged. Today
                      >everyone is entitled to a nice home with a nice view.
                      >
                      >That's narrow, I know, OSHA and the EPA need to control the pollution
                      >that
                      >resulted in these conditions. That's when the properties started to
                      >regain
                      >value. Townsend Ave and the Broad Street (West end) of Gloversville are
                      >
                      >much bette today without Levor's and the rest of the leather industry
                      >that
                      >lessed the city with jobs and prosperity. Yes there were other issues.
                      >
                      >The Cayadutta was a sewer for the industry from the north end of
                      >Gloversville to the Mohawk. Nowhere along its banks were the homes more
                      >
                      >than marginal in value, just because of the stink. Those least able to
                      >lived in homes along the creek. Some different today.
                      >
                      >PKL
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >Visit Gino's Railpage at
                      >http://www.ginosrailpage.com and http://fjgrr.org
                      >Visit The Greater Capital District Railfan Assocation at http://gcdranet.homelinux.com/
                      >Visit Pete Seftons Lost Landmark Page
                      >http://www.lostlandmarks.org
                      >Visit Charles P. Woolever's Existing Railroad Stations in New York State at
                      >http://ny.existingstations.com/
                      >Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      The sewage disposal plant, Harrison St. had an oder of its own..........
                    • Dick Ryall
                      ... You actually lived on Harrrison Street, holy smoke.........
                      Message 10 of 16 , Mar 14, 2005
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                        fjg1870 wrote:

                        >--- In FJGRailroad@yahoogroups.com, "Dicarlo, Gino"
                        ><Gino.Dicarlo@q...> wrote:
                        >What the heck was on Harrison Street in Gloversville that stunk so
                        >much? If you went to Parkhurst Field in the summer you would gag. I
                        >was told there was a sewage plant around there somewhere, but never
                        >noticed one.
                        >
                        >I lived on Harrison Street in the late 1940s. Yes there was a sewage
                        >plant on Harrision Street, it was about where the former Ni-Mo
                        >building is. My father used to call it the "rose factory". On a hot
                        >summer night the spell was something else. We moved from Harrision
                        >Street after having lived there about a year.
                        >
                        >Walt
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >Visit Gino's Railpage at
                        >http://www.ginosrailpage.com and http://fjgrr.org
                        >Visit The Greater Capital District Railfan Assocation at http://gcdranet.homelinux.com/
                        >Visit Pete Seftons Lost Landmark Page
                        >http://www.lostlandmarks.org
                        >Visit Charles P. Woolever's Existing Railroad Stations in New York State at
                        >http://ny.existingstations.com/
                        >Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        You actually lived on Harrrison Street, holy smoke.........
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