Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Kokahal 120-degree generation; Phoenix motorcars; backyard wind; GM fuelcell car

Expand Messages
  • Sterling D. Allan
    Free Energy News http://FreeEnergyNews.com The best news and directory service on the net regarding cutting edge energy
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 4, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      'Free Energy' News
      http://FreeEnergyNews.com

      The best news and directory service on the net
      regarding cutting edge energy technologies.

      (Go here for links to stories below, if you don't get this by HTML)

      Electricity - Make it, Don't buy it - Biodiesel in back yard
      http://pesnetwork.netw6000.hop.clickbank.net/ - Electricity - Make it, Don't buy it - eBook shows you how to set up your own electric company running on biodiesel fuel in your back yard.

      Thursday, October 5, 2006
      1860634 cumulative visits; 05:48 am GMT/UTC

      • Fuel Cells > GM Fuel Cell Vehicle Prototype (video) - A glimpse into the future?  With no engine compartment, everything is built into the chassis.  At ~US $1 million, the H-powered car is 10 to 20 years away from being commercially feasible. (YouTube) (Thanks Joel Garbon)

      Wednesday, October 4, 2006
      1857517 cumulative visits; 06:02 am GMT/UTC

      • Featured:
        EV
        > Phoenix Motorcars electric cars -
        Phoenix Motorcars, headquartered in Ojai, California, is an early leader in the mass production of full function, freeway speed electric automobiles.  Entertaining fleet orders. (PESWiki; Oct. 3) (Thanks John)
      • Hydrogen > BMW Presents hydrogen-powered production car - The BMW Hydrogen 7 is powered by a 191kW (260HP) twelve-cylinder engine that accelerates it from 0-100 km/h in 9.5 seconds. Top speed is limited electronically to 230 km/h (143 mph). Car can also run on premium gasoline. (Engineer Live; Oct. 2) (Leonard DiAsio)
      • Fuel Cells > Less expensive fuel cell may be possible - Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a new class of hydrogen fuel-cell catalysts that exhibit promising activity and stability. The catalysts are made of low-cost nonprecious metals entrapped in something called a heteroatomic-polymer structure, instead of platinum materials typically used in fuel cells. (PhysOrg; Oct. 3)
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.