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Angular Force Generator; Goldman Sachs shorted TransOcean

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  • Sterling D. Allan
    Free Energy News http://FreeEnergyNews.com Wednesday, May 5, 2010 a.. Featured: Oil Ecological Impact / Conspiracy No joke: Goldman Sachs shorted Gulf of
    Message 1 of 1 , May 5, 2010


      'Free Energy' News
      http://FreeEnergyNews.com 

      Wednesday, May 5, 2010

      • Featured: Oil > Ecological Impact / Conspiracy
        >

        No joke: Goldman Sachs shorted Gulf of Mexico - It turns out that Goldman Sachs really did place shorts on TransOcean stock days before the explosions rocked the rig in the Gulf of Mexico sending stocks plunging while GS profits soared -- benefitting once again from a huge disaster, having done the same with airline stocks prior to 911 then again with the housing bubble. (PESWiki; May 5, 2010)
      • Oil > Ecological Impact >
        Naturally Occuring Bacteria Could Help Clean Oil Spill - Natural microbes present in every ocean are superb cleaners, and with the addition of a bit of fertilizer they could prove successful in removing oil from the Gulf. A quick dusting near shore would help the microbes multiply and then they would dine on oil en masse until itÂ’s gone. The side effect ... (Inhabitat; May 3, 2010)

      Tuesday, May 4, 2010

      • Solar > PV / Emergency Preparedness > EMP
        >

        Can solar panels withstand an EMP attack? - Forum responses: Most panels have bypass diodes fitted to the discrete series arrays within the panel. Panels are not normally just a mass of cells. With EMP exposure the inverter is the biggest concern since the PN junction of a microchip/fet/transistor is much much smaller than a PN wafer of a PV panel... (EnergyMatters; May 03, 2010)

      Monday, May 3, 2010

      • Oil > Non-Fossil
        >
        href="http://peswiki.com/index.php/Directory:Algae_for_Oil">Algae
        >

        Making Oil in Minutes, Not Millennia - Chemical engineers at the University of Michigan are applying heat and pressure on microalgae, exploring a method to create affordable biofuel that could replace fossil fuels. They also hope to use the byproducts of bio-oil production as feedstock for more biofuel, combining hydrothermal, catalytic and biological approaches. (Wired; Apr. 30, 2010)

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