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MDI air car; new way to make water; Chevron & NREL on algae; solar in half

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  • Sterling D. Allan
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    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 1, 2007
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      'Free Energy' News
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      Thursday, November 1, 2007
      3180025 cumulative visits; 06:19 am GMT/UTC

      • Featured / Top 100:
        Efficient Vehicles > MDI Air Car
        - The MDI Air Car uses compressed air to push its engine's pistons, can hit 68 mph, has a range of 125 miles, and can be refuelled in a few minutes with custom air compressors at a cost of around $2. Tata Motors of India is planning to produce these zero-emissions cars in 2008. (PESWiki; Oct. 31) (Thanks John Q. Public)
      • Fuel Cells > Scientists discover new way to make water - Scientists at the University of Illinois have discovered a new way to make water, and without the pop. Not only can they make water from unlikely starting materials, such as alcohols, their work could also lead to better catalysts and less expensive fuel cells. (PhysOrg; Oct. 31)
      • Biodiesel from Algae Oil > Chevron and NREL to Research Fuel from Algae - Chevron and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory have agreed to study technology to produce liquid transportation fuels using algae. Although NREL's past research on algal biofuels focused on biodiesel, the lab has been interested in kerosene-like fuel and military jet fuels. (Green Car Congress; Oct. 31, 2007) (Thanks John Q. Public)
      • Solar > Cheap solar power poised to undercut oil and gas by half - Within five years, solar power will be cheap enough to compete with carbon-generated electricity, even in Britain, Scandinavia or upper Siberia. In a decade, the cost may have fallen so dramatically that solar cells could undercut oil, gas, coal and nuclear power by up to half. (Telegraph; UK; Feb. 18) (Thanks Fred Burks)
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