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Tips for taffeta?

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  • hazel.daniel@ymail.com
    Im working on a more toned down version of the famous dress from Gone With The Wind, as in the Curtain/green drapes.. And by toned down, I mean those giant
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 9, 2014
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      Im working on a more toned down version of the famous dress from Gone With The Wind, as in the Curtain/green drapes..

      And by toned down, I mean those giant skirts are gonna get deflated a fair bit, but im still gonna wear a petticoat beneath it.


      --im not looking. To replepicate it to matching seam perfection, hellIm rescuing the large velvet skirt from an abandoned project of mine.

      http://www.utexas.edu/news/files/gwtw_curtain_dress1.thumbnail.jpg



      I know the orginial underskirt is velvet, but i cant be doing with crawling everywhere for a similar shade ^^'


      Im thinking of using polyester taffeta (too poor for silk!), but i dont know anything about it aside from its stiffer and more like paper. :p

      Is this a good idea? 


      Any tips with working with this? i hope I've provided suitable information.

    • Sarah Strong
      I don t see any reason why polyester taffeta would not work fine. Be careful not to use too hot an iron, maybe also a pressing cloth, just to be on the safe
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 10, 2014
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        I don't see any reason why polyester taffeta would not work fine. Be careful not to use too hot an iron, maybe also a pressing cloth, just to be on the safe side.
        one way to reduce bulk/weight of full skirts is to make the skirt pattern pieces wedges, instead of rectangles. You preserve the width at the hem so it looks beautifully flared, but the gathers at the waist are more restrained. This also has the advantage, at least with a no-nap fabric, of saving yardage since you can cut those wedge shapes head-to-tail. You probably still want the total width of the skirt at the waist, to be about 1.5 to 2x the bodice waist measurement, so there will be some gathers there, but then it can flare as much as you want to the hem.
        Your petticoat can also be reduced-bulk at the waist by making it tiered, with the top tier just a bit bigger than your hips (again, in the 1.5x range) and then making the middle and bottom (or however many) much wider. I make lots of tiered skirts for dancing, and a 1-width (of 45" fabric) for the top tier goes well with a 2x middle and a 4x bottom tier to make a nice swirly skirt. (i set up my ruffling foot to compress the fabric the right amount along one edge so it's super easy to assemble them) if I was translating this idea to tulle for a petticoat, I might make the top tier out of muslin to support the weight, and then the middle and bottom tiers out of the tulle for the bounce.
        I hope you'll post photos when you get the dress made!
        S
        On 6/9/2014 6:36 PM, hazel.daniel@... [F-Costume] wrote:
         

        Im working on a more toned down version of the famous dress from Gone With The Wind, as in the Curtain/green drapes..

        And by toned down, I mean those giant skirts are gonna get deflated a fair bit, but im still gonna wear a petticoat beneath it.


        --im not looking. To replepicate it to matching seam perfection, hellIm rescuing the large velvet skirt from an abandoned project of mine.

        http://www.utexas.edu/news/files/gwtw_curtain_dress1.thumbnail.jpg



        I know the orginial underskirt is velvet, but i cant be doing with crawling everywhere for a similar shade ^^'


        Im thinking of using polyester taffeta (too poor for silk!), but i dont know anything about it aside from its stiffer and more like paper. :p

        Is this a good idea? 


        Any tips with working with this? i hope I've provided suitable information.


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