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Re: tangled; OT ranting

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  • Dina
    As a mom to two little proto-princesses, they tend to through a stage where they like pink and they like dressing things, even the one who says she wants to
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 1, 2010
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      As a mom to two little proto-princesses, they tend to through a stage where they like pink and they like dressing things, even the one who says she wants to marry the princess and fight the dragon (Mommy, can 2 princesses marry? Yes dear, if they really want to. Good, cause I never want to have kids!).

      Princess is not so much rank as being special to my girls. Everyone wants to be special.

      Antidotes: The Paper Bag Princess written by Robert Munsch and The Practical Princess by Jay Williams

      Both were made into animated shorts that no one has ever heard of...
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-O-3Gbl6VE

      Dina

      --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...> wrote:
      >
      > What a character does in a costume does not only help form the basic
      > costume, but our recreation of it. (How many folks cut down their
      > sleeves and trains after taking pics on their LOTR elves... that's
      > make-believe and we're wearing them in the real world.)
      >
      > >> 'Princess'-centric fairy tales are my big beef with Disney; yes,
      > princesses are pretty, but the last one the world had did not LIVE
      > happily ever after.
      >
      > Totally agree... Guess what. So does Disney. Details here:
      > http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/news/la-et-1121-tangled-20101121,0,7895261.story
      > . It says they're closing the book on fairy tales... buffing up the boy
      > bit. However, as we see in Tangled, they're still very into selling
      > pink and purple to girls, and I have to question how having the boy
      > being the charming heart-of-gold thief (reformed or not), makes a better
      > roll model for boys.
      >
      > Disney is a monster marketing machine and will keep targeting the kids,
      > but at least the costumes have more spunk to them.
      >
      > While we're talking about the film. Here's a short article, talks about
      > the hair and what it took to animate it.
      > http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/movies/2010/11/tangled-hair.html#more
      >
      > This movie does look like much fun. With that much activity, should be
      > interesting to watch what the animators do with the fabric. While
      > saving off the high-rez pictures, I noticed that they're representing
      > seams... there's a shot of the guy upside down, legs in "V" that lets
      > you check out construction for his trousers. <G> The animators are
      > discovering that you do have to pay attention to seams to get clothing
      > to move right. They don't always pay attention yet, as we saw by the 3
      > versions of the tangled dress, but at least they're getting there.
      >
      >
      > For those interested in more on computers and clothing, there's a link
      > in our Archive here to an article where the costume designer for Avatar
      > talks about taking samples of fabrics and weaving to the animators and
      > the issues and back and forth. It's worth looking up if you missed it
      > the first time.
      >
      > -Cat-
      >
    • Darka
      quite a rant. I should point out that Diana was not even remotely the last one (princess) the world had . I ve larped and I have indeed seen a frying pan
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 1, 2010
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        quite a rant. I should point out that Diana was not even remotely the "last one (princess) the world had".

        I've larped and I have indeed seen a frying pan boffed up. Good ideas, all!
      • Elizabeth Phillips
        No, she wasn t.  Nor was she a princess in her own right. ... quite a rant. I should point out that Diana was not even remotely the last one (princess) the
        Message 3 of 17 , Dec 1, 2010
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          No, she wasn't.  Nor was she a princess in her own right.

          --- On Wed, 12/1/10, Darka <janeravenswood@...> wrote:


          quite a rant. I should point out that Diana was not even remotely the "last one (princess) the world had".




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Carol Kocian
          ... Yeah, I thought that part of the rant was a bit odd. There are other countries with royalty. Besides, we have a princess story happening right now —Kate
          Message 4 of 17 , Dec 1, 2010
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            On Dec 1, 2010, at 4:09 PM, Elizabeth Phillips wrote:

            > No, she wasn't. Nor was she a princess in her own right.
            >
            > --- On Wed, 12/1/10, Darka <janeravenswood@...> wrote:
            >
            > quite a rant. I should point out that Diana was not even remotely
            > the "last one (princess) the world had".
            >

            Yeah, I thought that part of the rant was a bit odd. There are other
            countries with royalty. Besides, we have a princess story happening
            right now —Kate Middleton has been working for a while and is not
            getting married as a teenager. And engaged to someone her own age!

            I agree it's a phase for most girls. We used to describe a friend's
            daughter as half princess, half monkey. She could often be found
            swinging from a jungle gym in a princess dress-up gown. Now that
            she's a teenager, she is neither.

            Little girl princesses are exactly who the characters are for. The
            later the movie, the more the young woman does things for herself
            instead of waiting to be rescued. Rapunzel could wield a frying pan,
            and was quite skilled with her hair. Mulan was a soldier. It's
            simpler than what the article says. Movies with female leads are
            watched by women and girls. Movies with male leads are watched by
            everybody.

            Oh well, on to the costumes — I went to see it today and, having read
            the posts, I could see what was mentioned. Some details changing,
            working toward more realism but not quite there yet. The thing that
            struck me as funny was that the embroidery looked like it was based
            on machine embroidery rather than hand work. I liked the brocade
            texture of the stepmother's dress.

            -Carol
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