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Re: [F-Costume] Re: Faux blood stains

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  • Sarah Strong
    Maybe there is a glossy fabric paint? Definitely mix with fabric medium. If it is too goopy (test) you can also dilute it with water to make it easier to
    Message 1 of 13 , Sep 10, 2010
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      Maybe there is a glossy fabric paint? Definitely mix with fabric medium.
      If it is too goopy (test) you can also dilute it with water to make it
      easier to apply. Also test whether it can withstand a dryer, or needs to
      be drip-dried.
      The plain karo syrup-food coloring mix is a wash-out formula (works even
      better with a little detergent added to the mix up front), may be useful
      in a different context or costume...
      S

      Ann Garner wrote:
      >
      >
      > At 11:02 AM 9/10/2010, you wrote:
      > >Thanks! I forgot to also say that the stain needs to be permanent
      > >and able to handle being washed in a machine.
      > Well, use the right shade of paint to paint on the blood stain. Use
      > fabric medium to keep it soft. Use some of the syrup to give it the
      > gloss you are looking for.
      > Ann in Arkansas
      >
      >
    • Cat Devereaux
      Ah, I love the fun of blood discussion on costumes! It s a sign that Halloween is around the corner. There s quite a bit of discussion last year about
      Message 2 of 13 , Sep 10, 2010
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        Ah, I love the fun of blood discussion on costumes! It's a sign that
        Halloween is around the corner.

        There's quite a bit of discussion last year about blooding up outfits
        for perminate, non-messy zombie dressing last year. Might want to
        search on zombie or blood.


        You're going to want to play w/ some formulas a bit.
        -- As mentioned, color -- mostly red w/ a drop or two of blue acrylic paint.
        -- Washability - fabric medium. Softer = more... but also can't get it
        too thick.
        -- Wet look - gloss medium.... but you want something really thin
        because a lot of gloss mediums are rather think... and you're fighting
        issues. Shinny gloss is often a smooth surface you can flip light back
        from, vs. soaked into a fabric looking fresh, you're not going to get
        the same kind of shine.

        Your blood mix will need to be rather fluid to apply "nicely". You'll
        have to add some water to apply the blood decoratively. You'll want to
        do various sprays and blobs. Try out the Dexter site for different
        types of blood patterns: http://www.sho.com/site/dexter/extras.do#games
        (Select Blood Splatter)

        Do this outside, or in the shower. Use lots of plastic/garbage bags to
        protect the area, and what you're wearing.

        Please report back on what recipe you end up using.

        -Cat-
      • Naresha
        I m not sure if this would work - the more experienced members here would be able to correct me I m sure.  Would you be able to use some red fabric dye and
        Message 3 of 13 , Sep 10, 2010
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          I'm not sure if this would work - the more experienced members here would be able to correct me I'm sure.  Would you be able to use some red fabric dye and add a little bit of blue etc to mix it to the right colour and then apply it to the actress' costume?  It would keep it softer than paint.


          --- On Sat, 11/9/10, Anthony <la_atran@...> wrote:

          From: Anthony <la_atran@...>
          Subject: [F-Costume] Faux blood stains
          To: f-costume@yahoogroups.com
          Received: Saturday, 11 September, 2010, 1:36 AM







           









          I'm working on a play in which one of the characters kills an animal, comes onstage with its bloody body, and in turn is supposed to have blood all over her clothing as well. Did I mention she's wearing white? So I have doubles on the costume: a clean version and one she changes into that is supposed to be pre-bloodied. Does anyone have any ideas for pre-blooding clothes? Should I use paint? If so, what kind of paint? And is there a type of glossy coating I can apply over the paint to make it appear "wet" without making the fabric stiff?

          Thanks for all the help!

























          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Cat Devereaux
          ... Nope... dye is concentrated and wants to spread around. It willl flow Also, the color you see is not the color you ll end up with. Everything wet will be
          Message 4 of 13 , Sep 10, 2010
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            On 9/10/2010 2:40 PM, Naresha wrote:
            > I'm not sure if this would work - the more experienced members here
            > would be able to correct me I'm sure. Would you be able to use some
            > red fabric dye and add a little bit of blue etc to mix it to the right
            > colour and then apply it to the actress' costume? It would keep it
            > softer than paint.
            Nope... dye is concentrated and wants to spread around. It willl flow
            Also, the color you see is not the color you'll end up with. Everything
            wet will be darker than the final result when dried. The fabric medium
            will allow the color to sink into the threads and lock.

            -Cat-
          • Alyson
            When I create blood stains for photo shots I use red cherry syrup and add a little bit of black to the syrup so that there is depth to the blood. Cherry
            Message 5 of 13 , Sep 10, 2010
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              When I create blood stains for photo shots I use red cherry syrup and add a
              little bit of black to the syrup so that there is depth to the "blood." Cherry
              syrup (or strawberry but cherry is usually clearer) stains and it is sticky to
              work with (watch the eyes) but the stain is permanent.

              Kemper


              One cannot silly-walk into Mordor.





              ________________________________
              From: Anthony <la_atran@...>
              To: F-Costume@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Fri, September 10, 2010 8:02:54 AM
              Subject: [F-Costume] Re: Faux blood stains


              Thanks! I forgot to also say that the stain needs to be permanent and able to
              handle being washed in a machine.

              --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, Ann Garner <mystique@...> wrote:
              >
              > At 10:36 AM 9/10/2010, you wrote:
              > >I'm working on a play in which one of the characters kills an
              > >animal, comes onstage with its bloody body, and in turn is supposed
              > >to have blood all over her clothing as well. Did I mention she's
              > >wearing white? So I have doubles on the costume: a clean version
              > >and one she changes into that is supposed to be pre-bloodied. Does
              > >anyone have any ideas for pre-blooding clothes? Should I use
              > >paint? If so, what kind of paint? And is there a type of glossy
              > >coating I can apply over the paint to make it appear "wet" without
              > >making the fabric stiff?
              > >Thanks for all the help!
              > Kayro syrup with food coloring mixed in. Use a touch of blue added
              > to the red to get it a bit darker than the bright red of red food coloring.
              > Ann in Arkansas
              >




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • JR
              My fake blood is a mixture of corn syrup, red food dye (with a little bit of green to darken), and cocoa powder. I ve heard Nesquick powder also works well.
              Message 6 of 13 , Sep 10, 2010
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                My fake blood is a mixture of corn syrup, red food dye (with a little bit of green to darken), and cocoa powder. I've heard Nesquick powder also works well. This gives it that brown tint that drying blood has when it itself dries.
                It tastes like YooHoo and stains pretty well.
              • Cat Devereaux
                ... little bit of green to darken), and cocoa powder. I ve heard Nesquick powder also works well. This gives it that brown tint that drying blood has when it
                Message 7 of 13 , Sep 10, 2010
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                  >> My fake blood is a mixture of corn syrup, red food dye (with a
                  little bit of green to darken), and cocoa powder. I've heard Nesquick
                  powder also works well. This gives it that brown tint that drying blood
                  has when it itself dries.

                  The just right recipe depends on your exact use. Not just for wet, but
                  for color. And, is the color suppose to be accurate or like movie
                  blood, etc.

                  Even if you're going for "wet" right now blood, you do have to be
                  careful about mixtures. Depending on the time of year and part of the
                  country, you get insects way toooooooooooooo fast.


                  For trivia... black and white films just used Hershey's syrup. For
                  cheap color movies, colorized Carrol's syurp gets used... but leave it
                  on too long to bake... and your poor actor may not be able to get out of
                  it. (Ask the actors from the original Texas Chainsaw Massacre!)

                  -Cat-
                • Kevin Curley
                  I do SFX for film and TV--one thing we have done is using hair gel with food coloring in it---the gel does not dry out or attract insects--allowing for longer
                  Message 8 of 13 , Sep 10, 2010
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                    I do SFX for film and TV--one thing we have done is using hair gel with food coloring in it---the gel does not dry out or attract insects--allowing for longer shooting time and a easier on the actors---also the natural sheen of the gel makes a better wet look.

                    --- On Fri, 9/10/10, Anthony <la_atran@...> wrote:

                    From: Anthony <la_atran@...>
                    Subject: [F-Costume] Faux blood stains
                    To: f-costume@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Friday, September 10, 2010, 7:36 AM
















                     









                    I'm working on a play in which one of the characters kills an animal, comes onstage with its bloody body, and in turn is supposed to have blood all over her clothing as well. Did I mention she's wearing white? So I have doubles on the costume: a clean version and one she changes into that is supposed to be pre-bloodied. Does anyone have any ideas for pre-blooding clothes? Should I use paint? If so, what kind of paint? And is there a type of glossy coating I can apply over the paint to make it appear "wet" without making the fabric stiff?

                    Thanks for all the help!






























                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Cat Devereaux
                    ... Ohhhh... do you recommend an specific gel??? Some hold up better under the heat. It s good to get rid of the food component. I wonder if for the stage
                    Message 9 of 13 , Sep 10, 2010
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                      On 9/10/2010 10:17 PM, Kevin Curley wrote:
                      > I do SFX for film and TV--one thing we have done is using hair gel
                      > with food coloring in it---the gel does not dry out or attract
                      > insects--allowing for longer shooting time and a easier on the
                      > actors---also the natural sheen of the gel makes a better wet look.
                      Ohhhh... do you recommend an specific gel??? Some hold up better under
                      the heat. It's good to get rid of the food component.


                      I wonder if for the stage production, a basic paint job could be
                      accented with a bit of the gel. I guess it depends on what else is
                      going on in the scene and how easy it is to avoid transfer.

                      Though maybe it wouldn't work because the dress does need to stay
                      "white" during washing.

                      -Cat-
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