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Project Runway

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  • Penny Ladnier
    I received this announcement. If you are interested contact the person in the announcement.
    Message 1 of 13 , Apr 19, 2010
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      I received this announcement. If you are interested contact the person in the announcement.
      ____________________________________________________________________________________

      I'm a casting director for Project Runway. We are seeking fashion designers for our new season. Many of our strongest designers have come from the costuming world.

      Submission information is on our website:

      www.bunim-murray.com/prcasting

      Please feel free to forward this email. We are looking for a diversity of designers--age(21+), region, POV--we want to see it all!

      Call or reply if you have any questions.

      Thanks so much!

      Kasha Foster
      Project Runway Casting
      818 756 7030
      kfoster@...

      __________________________________________________________________________________
      Penny Ladnier
      Owner, The Costume Gallery Websites
      www.costumegallery.com
      14 websites of fashion, textiles, & costume history

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Elizabeth Phillips
      Kewl. ... From: Penny Ladnier Subject: [F-Costume] Project Runway To: F-costume Date: Monday, April
      Message 2 of 13 , Apr 19, 2010
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        Kewl.

        --- On Mon, 4/19/10, Penny Ladnier <penny1a@...> wrote:


        From: Penny Ladnier <penny1a@...>
        Subject: [F-Costume] Project Runway
        To: "F-costume" <F-costume@yahoogroups.com>
        Date: Monday, April 19, 2010, 2:56 PM


        I received this announcement.  If you are interested contact the person in the announcement.
        ____________________________________________________________________________________

        I'm a casting director for Project Runway. We are seeking fashion designers for our new season. Many of our strongest designers have come from the costuming world.

        Submission information is on our website:

        www.bunim-murray.com/prcasting

        Please feel free to forward this email. We are looking for a diversity of designers--age(21+), region, POV--we want to see it all!

        Call or reply if you have any questions.

        Thanks so much!

        Kasha Foster
        Project Runway Casting
        818 756 7030
        kfoster@...

        __________________________________________________________________________________
        Penny Ladnier
        Owner, The Costume Gallery Websites
        www.costumegallery.com
        14 websites of fashion, textiles, & costume history

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



        ------------------------------------

        Yahoo! Groups Links








        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • cloakmakerusa
        I just called her. Income from professional costuming does not count. So I can apply. The question is, should I? Dina
        Message 3 of 13 , Apr 20, 2010
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          I just called her. Income from professional costuming does not count. So I can apply. The question is, should I?

          Dina

          --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, Elizabeth Phillips <lilibetp@...> wrote:
          >
          > Kewl.
          >
          > --- On Mon, 4/19/10, Penny Ladnier <penny1a@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > From: Penny Ladnier <penny1a@...>
          > Subject: [F-Costume] Project Runway
          > To: "F-costume" <F-costume@yahoogroups.com>
          > Date: Monday, April 19, 2010, 2:56 PM
          >
          >
          > I received this announcement.  If you are interested contact the person in the announcement.
          > ____________________________________________________________________________________
          >
          > I'm a casting director for Project Runway. We are seeking fashion designers for our new season. Many of our strongest designers have come from the costuming world.
          >
          > Submission information is on our website:
          >
          > www.bunim-murray.com/prcasting
          >
          > Please feel free to forward this email. We are looking for a diversity of designers--age(21+), region, POV--we want to see it all!
          >
          > Call or reply if you have any questions.
          >
          > Thanks so much!
          >
          > Kasha Foster
          > Project Runway Casting
          > 818 756 7030
          > kfoster@...
          >
          > __________________________________________________________________________________
          > Penny Ladnier
          > Owner, The Costume Gallery Websites
          > www.costumegallery.com
          > 14 websites of fashion, textiles, & costume history
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Penny Ladnier
          Dina, Go for it or you might wonder all your life if you could have made it. From the casting interviews of the past contestants, some have tried out two or
          Message 4 of 13 , Apr 20, 2010
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            Dina,

            Go for it or you might wonder all your life if you could have made it. From the casting interviews of the past contestants, some have tried out two or three times.

            Good luck! Let us know how it goes!

            Penny Ladnier
            Owner, The Costume Gallery Websites
            www.costumegallery.com
            14 websites of fashion, textiles, & costume history


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jehanni
            ... My husband tells me don t apply, I don t want to se them make you cry on national TV. I think it s sweet that he wants to protect me, and my image of
            Message 5 of 13 , Apr 22, 2010
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              --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, "cloakmakerusa" <cloakmakerusa@...> wrote:
              >
              > I just called her. Income from professional costuming does not count. So I can apply. The question is, should I?
              >
              > Dina

              My husband tells me "don't apply, I don't want to se them make you cry on national TV."

              I think it's sweet that he wants to protect me, and my image of myself is that it's not that easy to make me cry. However, I think he's picking up on an element of what makes good "reality TV" (or for that matter, fictional TV) shows--drama.

              The producers, I believe, are looking for contestants who provide a blend of skills and attributes, only some of which are directly related to costume/fashion design. To answer for yourself whether you "should" apply, consider these things:

              Do you have a good visual presence? Most of us don't live in front of a camera, but on this show, you will for a period of time. Are you willing to have a camera poked into your business willy-nilly-- brushing teeth, arguing, crying, thinking, dressing, bitching, musing--and will you look interesting at all those times?

              Can you create under pressure, and keep creating under pressure, over and over again, as you get more and more sleep-deprived? The show is not shot one episode a week as we view it, but in intense compression, rolling from one challenge right into the next, as I understand it--three weeks of back-to-back one-day fire-drills will force drama on those with a slower/considered style. For some people, trial by fire is not fun. I think it needs to be if you want to play this game.

              Do you have a singular point-of-view? Not just as a design aesthetic, but as a way of helping viewers remember who you are in the mass of "new characters" they have to learn to identify with. "The one who cries" or "the one who snarks" or even 'the one with the tattoos" is more memorable than "the second blonde who looks a little like a young Madonna, no the other one with the--oh, I can't tell them apart."

              Do you have a back-story? Something the show can reveal/tag you with/keep reinforcing/use to help viewers remember who you are and identify with you/root for you or against you? Remember, Americans as a sweeping generalization love scrappy underdogs and love to hate villains-who-seem-to-be-winning, and either backstory makes a memorable character.

              Oh, about the fashion design: what will you gain (cash, fame, open doors, validation) if you compete, and what (current job, privacy, possibly relationships) will you give up, and what (sleep deprivation, harsh criticism by judges, random snarking by complete strangers) will you have to endure? Could you get there any other way? Since the odds are long about even auditioning, this isn't a typical career path, but a lottery. Do you play the lottery now? Are you laid low by not winning? Would you take being the first one sent home as a sign to quit costuming?

              On a perfectly practical front--can you pay your rent/mortgage if you get picked? Can you work your butt off for a month or more and not get ill? Can you actually sew?

              Could be fun.
            • Elizabeth Phillips
              No, thanks.  I love to watch Project Runway, and I d love to meet Tim and Nina, but I would ot want to be on the show. ... My husband tells me don t apply, I
              Message 6 of 13 , Apr 23, 2010
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                No, thanks.  I love to watch Project Runway, and I'd love to meet Tim and Nina, but I would ot want to be on the show.

                --- On Thu, 4/22/10, Jehanni <jehanni2@...> wrote:


                My husband tells me "don't apply, I don't want to se them make you cry on national TV."

                I think it's sweet that he wants to protect me, and my image of myself is that it's not that easy to make me cry. However, I think he's picking up on an element of what makes good "reality TV" (or for that matter, fictional TV) shows--drama.

                The producers, I believe, are looking for contestants who provide a blend of skills and attributes, only some of which are directly related to costume/fashion design.  To answer for yourself whether you "should" apply, consider these things:

                Do you have a good visual presence? Most of us don't live in front of a camera, but on this show, you will for a period of time. Are you willing to have a camera poked into your business willy-nilly-- brushing teeth, arguing, crying, thinking, dressing, bitching, musing--and will you look interesting at all those times?

                Can you create under pressure, and keep creating under pressure, over and over again, as you get more and more sleep-deprived? The show is not shot one episode a week as we view it, but in intense compression, rolling from one challenge right into the next, as I understand it--three weeks of back-to-back one-day fire-drills will force drama on those with a slower/considered style. For some people, trial by fire is not fun. I think it needs to be if you want to play this game.

                Do you have a singular point-of-view? Not just as a design aesthetic, but as a way of helping viewers remember who you are in the mass of "new characters" they have to learn to identify with. "The one who cries" or "the one who snarks" or even 'the one with the tattoos" is more memorable than "the second blonde who looks a little like a young Madonna, no the other one with the--oh, I can't tell them apart."

                Do you have a back-story? Something the show can reveal/tag you with/keep reinforcing/use to help viewers remember who you are and identify with you/root for you or against you? Remember, Americans as a sweeping generalization love scrappy underdogs and love to hate villains-who-seem-to-be-winning, and either backstory makes a memorable character.

                Oh, about the fashion design: what will you gain (cash, fame, open doors, validation) if you compete, and what (current job, privacy, possibly relationships) will you give up, and what (sleep deprivation, harsh criticism by judges, random snarking by complete strangers) will you have to endure? Could you get there any other way? Since the odds are long about even auditioning, this isn't a typical career path, but a lottery. Do you play the lottery now? Are you laid low by not winning? Would you take being the first one sent home as a sign to quit costuming?

                On a perfectly practical front--can you pay your rent/mortgage if you get picked? Can you work your butt off for a month or more and not get ill? Can you actually sew?

                Could be fun.




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Susan Toker
                Dina I think its a great idea that you applied. You have the experience to give you the confidence to get the work done. This show still requires ability.
                Message 7 of 13 , Apr 23, 2010
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                  Dina

                  I think its a great idea that you applied. You have the experience to give
                  you the confidence to get the work done. This show still requires ability.
                  Good luck and I hope you can get in!

                  Unfortunately the producers have been a bit too focused on the usual reality
                  show drama and miss the point that people who watch this show are often more
                  interested in the design and construction process and techniques rather then
                  "who is crying now".

                  I think the hardesr problem with this show is its tendency to cast for
                  "looks" and "personality" rather then talent and creative ideas (but then
                  that IS the fashion world).

                  Susan T.


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Penny Ladnier
                  From my academic experience, there is a lot of drama when putting fashion designers in one room. A lot of competition and at times it turns to petty jabs like
                  Message 8 of 13 , Apr 23, 2010
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                    From my academic experience, there is a lot of drama when putting fashion designers in one room. A lot of competition and at times it turns to petty jabs like on the PR. If you watched the reunion show last night, you will see what I mean. Costume design students like to share and help one another. Maybe this is because they are more like a family and work for a common goal to do anything to get the show on the road.

                    Penny Ladnier
                    Owner, The Costume Gallery Websites
                    www.costumegallery.com
                    14 websites of fashion, textiles, & costume history


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • cloakmakerusa
                    ... That s will likely doom me - Looks, and lack of good visual presence. ... This is the part I will have no trouble with - I am a professional costumer, and
                    Message 9 of 13 , Apr 23, 2010
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                      --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, "Jehanni" <jehanni2@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, "cloakmakerusa" <cloakmakerusa@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > I just called her. Income from professional costuming does not count. So I can apply. The question is, should I?
                      > >
                      > > Dina
                      >
                      > My husband tells me "don't apply, I don't want to se them make you cry on national TV."
                      >
                      > I think it's sweet that he wants to protect me, and my image of myself is that it's not that easy to make me cry. However, I think he's picking up on an element of what makes good "reality TV" (or for that matter, fictional TV) shows--drama.
                      >
                      > The producers, I believe, are looking for contestants who provide a blend of skills and attributes, only some of which are directly related to costume/fashion design. To answer for yourself whether you "should" apply, consider these things:
                      >
                      > Do you have a good visual presence? Most of us don't live in front of a camera, but on this show, you will for a period of time. Are you willing to have a camera poked into your business willy-nilly-- brushing teeth, arguing, crying, thinking, dressing, bitching, musing--and will you look interesting at all those times?


                      That's will likely doom me - Looks, and lack of good visual presence.
                      >
                      > Can you create under pressure, and keep creating under pressure, over and over again, as you get more and more sleep-deprived? The show is not shot one episode a week as we view it, but in intense compression, rolling from one challenge right into the next, as I understand it--three weeks of back-to-back one-day fire-drills will force drama on those with a slower/considered style. For some people, trial by fire is not fun. I think it needs to be if you want to play this game.

                      This is the part I will have no trouble with - I am a professional costumer, and I do weddings. An extra bridesmaid's dress in 2 day out of fabric that was discontinued a year ago? - all in a days work.

                      >
                      > Do you have a singular point-of-view? Not just as a design aesthetic, but as a way of helping viewers remember who you are in the mass of "new characters" they have to learn to identify with. "The one who cries" or "the one who snarks" or even 'the one with the tattoos" is more memorable than "the second blonde who looks a little like a young Madonna, no the other one with the--oh, I can't tell them apart."

                      I guess I'd be the fat one...
                      >
                      > Do you have a back-story? Something the show can reveal/tag you with/keep reinforcing/use to help viewers remember who you are and identify with you/root for you or against you? Remember, Americans as a sweeping generalization love scrappy underdogs and love to hate villains-who-seem-to-be-winning, and either backstory makes a memorable character.
                      >
                      I have several back backstories...


                      > Oh, about the fashion design: what will you gain (cash, fame, open doors, validation) if you compete, and what (current job, privacy, possibly relationships) will you give up, and what (sleep deprivation, harsh criticism by judges, random snarking by complete strangers) will you have to endure? Could you get there any other way? Since the odds are long about even auditioning, this isn't a typical career path, but a lottery. Do you play the lottery now? Are you laid low by not winning? Would you take being the first one sent home as a sign to quit costuming?

                      I've been costuming for 20 years with little recognition and almost no pay - what would be different?
                      >
                      > On a perfectly practical front--can you pay your rent/mortgage if you get picked?

                      That's what husbands are for!

                      > Can you work your butt off for a month or more and not get ill?

                      I can do it in a tent, with a treadle machine!

                      >Can you actually sew?

                      Yeah. WWW.CloakMaker.com/gallery.html
                      >
                      > Could be fun.
                      >
                      Could be...

                      Dina
                    • cloakmakerusa
                      Have t done it yet - haven t had time! Deadline has been extended until the 27 or 30th, depending on where you look. I think they had some very good
                      Message 10 of 13 , Apr 24, 2010
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                        Have't done it yet - haven't had time! Deadline has been extended until the 27 or 30th, depending on where you look.

                        I think they had some very good designers (and some crazy ringers) this last time.

                        Dina


                        --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, Susan Toker <susantoker@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Dina
                        >
                        > I think its a great idea that you applied. You have the experience to give
                        > you the confidence to get the work done. This show still requires ability.
                        > Good luck and I hope you can get in!
                        >
                        > Unfortunately the producers have been a bit too focused on the usual reality
                        > show drama and miss the point that people who watch this show are often more
                        > interested in the design and construction process and techniques rather then
                        > "who is crying now".
                        >
                        > I think the hardesr problem with this show is its tendency to cast for
                        > "looks" and "personality" rather then talent and creative ideas (but then
                        > that IS the fashion world).
                        >
                        > Susan T.
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                      • Jehanni
                        ... ... As someone now 200 pounds who was once 100 pounds, I hear ya. And I want to point out that fat is not, de-facto, lack of visual presence. From
                        Message 11 of 13 , Apr 25, 2010
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                          --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, "cloakmakerusa" <cloakmakerusa@...> wrote (in response tothe first para):
                          <snip>
                          > > Do you have a good visual presence? Most of us don't live in front of a camera, but on this show, you will for a period of time. Are you willing to have a camera poked into your business willy-nilly-- brushing teeth, arguing, crying, thinking, dressing, bitching, musing--and will you look interesting at all those times?
                          >
                          >
                          > That's will likely doom me - Looks, and lack of good visual presence.

                          > I guess I'd be the fat one...

                          As someone now 200 pounds who was once 100 pounds, I hear ya. And I want to point out that "fat" is not, de-facto, lack of visual presence. From Queen Latifah to Kathy Najimy to Gabourey Sidibe, entertainment media have occasionally recognized that a woman who is not size 0 can be worthy of camera time.

                          I also think a lot of visual presence is self-confidence--feeling within and then projecting that you are comfortable, confident, graceful, assured. Chris March (season 6?) is not skinny, but he came across as very comfortable with himself, and very assured in a laid-back way.

                          Designing yourself--your image--is in one sense trivial, and in another, tremendously important. First impressions, and all that "What-Not-To-Wear" lecture on looking like the kind of person others want to do business with *can* get you the first interview. And we all know there's a luck factor in judgement that has nothing to do with us, and everything to do with the mood and whim of the person doing the judging.

                          More important, in my thinking is, does the possibility of having an experience, an audition experience, good or bad or wacky, appeal to you?
                        • cloakmakerusa
                          I love having an audience as a teacher or lecturer, so yes. I did a demo this weekend at a Folk Festival event on Creating repeating patterns with dye and
                          Message 12 of 13 , Apr 26, 2010
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                            I love having an audience as a teacher or lecturer, so yes. I did a demo this weekend at a Folk Festival event on "Creating repeating patterns with dye" and had a lot of fun.

                            Video is done, pictures are in the queue at Staples, and I only have 2 more pages of the 22 page application to fill out and a CD to burn.

                            Then overnight mail...

                            Dina


                            --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, "Jehanni" <jehanni2@...> wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, "cloakmakerusa" <cloakmakerusa@> wrote (in response tothe first para):
                            > <snip>
                            > > > Do you have a good visual presence? Most of us don't live in front of a camera, but on this show, you will for a period of time. Are you willing to have a camera poked into your business willy-nilly-- brushing teeth, arguing, crying, thinking, dressing, bitching, musing--and will you look interesting at all those times?
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > That's will likely doom me - Looks, and lack of good visual presence.
                            >
                            > > I guess I'd be the fat one...
                            >
                            > As someone now 200 pounds who was once 100 pounds, I hear ya. And I want to point out that "fat" is not, de-facto, lack of visual presence. From Queen Latifah to Kathy Najimy to Gabourey Sidibe, entertainment media have occasionally recognized that a woman who is not size 0 can be worthy of camera time.
                            >
                            > I also think a lot of visual presence is self-confidence--feeling within and then projecting that you are comfortable, confident, graceful, assured. Chris March (season 6?) is not skinny, but he came across as very comfortable with himself, and very assured in a laid-back way.
                            >
                            > Designing yourself--your image--is in one sense trivial, and in another, tremendously important. First impressions, and all that "What-Not-To-Wear" lecture on looking like the kind of person others want to do business with *can* get you the first interview. And we all know there's a luck factor in judgement that has nothing to do with us, and everything to do with the mood and whim of the person doing the judging.
                            >
                            > More important, in my thinking is, does the possibility of having an experience, an audition experience, good or bad or wacky, appeal to you?
                            >
                          • Sarah Strong
                            I think I was at that same folk festival on Sunday!
                            Message 13 of 13 , Apr 26, 2010
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                              I think I was at that same folk festival on Sunday!

                              cloakmakerusa wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > I love having an audience as a teacher or lecturer, so yes. I did a demo
                              > this weekend at a Folk Festival event on "Creating repeating patterns
                              > with dye" and had a lot of fun.
                              >
                              > Video is done, pictures are in the queue at Staples, and I only have 2
                              > more pages of the 22 page application to fill out and a CD to burn.
                              >
                              > Then overnight mail...
                              >
                              > Dina
                              >
                              > --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com <mailto:F-Costume%40yahoogroups.com>,
                              > "Jehanni" <jehanni2@...> wrote:
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com
                              > <mailto:F-Costume%40yahoogroups.com>, "cloakmakerusa" <cloakmakerusa@>
                              > wrote (in response tothe first para):
                              > > <snip>
                              > > > > Do you have a good visual presence? Most of us don't live in
                              > front of a camera, but on this show, you will for a period of time. Are
                              > you willing to have a camera poked into your business willy-nilly--
                              > brushing teeth, arguing, crying, thinking, dressing, bitching,
                              > musing--and will you look interesting at all those times?
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > > > That's will likely doom me - Looks, and lack of good visual presence.
                              > >
                              > > > I guess I'd be the fat one...
                              > >
                              > > As someone now 200 pounds who was once 100 pounds, I hear ya. And I
                              > want to point out that "fat" is not, de-facto, lack of visual presence.
                              > From Queen Latifah to Kathy Najimy to Gabourey Sidibe, entertainment
                              > media have occasionally recognized that a woman who is not size 0 can be
                              > worthy of camera time.
                              > >
                              > > I also think a lot of visual presence is self-confidence--feeling
                              > within and then projecting that you are comfortable, confident,
                              > graceful, assured. Chris March (season 6?) is not skinny, but he came
                              > across as very comfortable with himself, and very assured in a laid-back
                              > way.
                              > >
                              > > Designing yourself--your image--is in one sense trivial, and in
                              > another, tremendously important. First impressions, and all that
                              > "What-Not-To-Wear" lecture on looking like the kind of person others
                              > want to do business with *can* get you the first interview. And we all
                              > know there's a luck factor in judgement that has nothing to do with us,
                              > and everything to do with the mood and whim of the person doing the judging.
                              > >
                              > > More important, in my thinking is, does the possibility of having an
                              > experience, an audition experience, good or bad or wacky, appeal to you?
                              > >
                              >
                              >
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