Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: "Wearing" Fabric?

Expand Messages
  • cloakmakerusa
    Fullers earth works great for giving just the right slight dirt to cuffs and collars For fading/toning down a color - wash on hot with a new black T shirt and
    Message 1 of 27 , Mar 25 6:54 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      Fullers earth works great for giving just the right slight dirt to cuffs and collars

      For fading/toning down a color - wash on hot with a new black T shirt and new jeans

      Rolling around in a sealed bucket of sand can take the shine off satin a bit - works like sandpaper, but you can send it down hill by itself. We did 10 buckets on a big hill - drove down, hauled them back up by car - I think 8 or 9 trips did the trick.

      Dina

      --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, Naresha <north_shore_fruitcake@...> wrote:
      >
      > By "drain" I mean fade.  What I have is some satin that's somewhere in the colour region between sky blue and baby blue.  It's a lovely shade, but a bit vibrant - but it was the ONLY fabric even close to the right colour.
      >
      > I was HOPING (but won't be bitterly disappointed if I can't) to fade the blue a bit - so it kind of gets a bit of that look of "been washed 10000 times"- that greyed out sort of dullness that lighter coloured clothes tend to get when well loved.  I don't want to darken it as such and my capacity for dying things is pretty low right now.
      >
      > The other problem I have is the character is essentially a non-entity.  It's a non-speaking ensemble character from a musical and they only appear in this costume for less than 15min.  One and a half songs.  And there's no set overall time period - all the vampires are from varying ages.  Makes for one hell of a display of costumes I can tell you!  BUT some nice fans have complied a list of time periods - this costume is listed as 1820-1848, I don't know the English translation of the period name (Biedermeier is the German if anyone knows it)
      >
      > HAHAH!  I'll settle for softening it, but if it's possible and not ridiculously time consuming and expensive (time and cash poor right now)  I'd like to try playing with the colour modification a bit.
      >
      >
      >
      > --- On Thu, 25/3/10, Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...> wrote:
      >
      > From: Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...>
      > Subject: Re: [F-Costume] "Wearing" Fabric?
      > To: F-Costume@yahoogroups.com
      > Received: Thursday, 25 March, 2010, 8:26 PM
      >
      >
      > >>Is there a way to drain any of the colour out of modern fabrics at all?
      >
      >
      >
      > Drain??? Need more definition than that.. If you want to take color
      >
      > out... bleach really will do that. If you want to tone down a color...
      >
      > overdye works. In LOTR, they've often overdye brighter colors for the
      >
      > gowns, but much of the mens, was dunked in some kind of a darker wash.
      >
      > Depends on what color the original is. Is this sun fade??? Earthen??
      >
      > Varies a lot. Basically answer the questions of time and place? Use?
      >
      > Station. Are you just trying to tone down a piece of fabric?
      >
      >
      >
      > White tones down w/ a tea wash or the burnt seina wash I was taking
      >
      > about. Quick bits, just use paints, whole fabric, you want dyes.
      >
      >
      >
      > Honestly with modern fabrics that are just too bright, I throw them in
      >
      > with something new... a couple rounds with a newish pair of black jeans
      >
      > does wonders. (My grandmother would roll over in her grave if she saw
      >
      > what I did to get my shirts the colors they are now.) Then again,
      >
      > historically they would use intense "blue ball" to wash a blue cast onto
      >
      > whites to "whiten" then.
      >
      >
      >
      > So... now that you have more information that you need... back to the
      >
      > original question. When you're making a costume and trying to
      >
      > transform it... and you ask the question for transforming. .. what are
      >
      > you starting with, where you do want to go. When you costume, keep in
      >
      > mine the character, their station, their location, what they're doing...
      >
      > all that goes together for a "simple" question.
      >
      >
      >
      > Just softening the fabric was an easy question.
      >
      >
      >
      > (ducking now)
      >
      >
      >
      > -Cat-
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Cat Devereaux
      ... cuffs and collars But it s not really perminate enough even with hairspray. Good for productions but not a long term costume... imho, or is there a new
      Message 2 of 27 , Mar 25 8:45 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        >> Fullers earth works great for giving just the right slight dirt to
        cuffs and collars

        But it's not really perminate enough even with hairspray. Good for
        productions but not a long term costume... imho, or is there a new
        fixative?

        >> For fading/toning down a color - wash on hot with a new black T
        shirt and new jeans

        I'm glad to see I'm not the only one that finds that a good "greying"
        option. ;-)


        >> Rolling around in a sealed bucket of sand can take the shine off
        satin a bit - works like sandpaper, but you can send it down hill by
        itself. We did 10 buckets on a big hill - drove down, hauled them back
        up by car - I think 8 or 9 trips did the trick.

        How many yards of fabric were you working with to have that much fun???
        What kind of project?


        Can you tell I love talking distressing whether it's 'loving hands at
        home' like we did w/ zombies as well last year... but the pro stuff...
        from sand barrows to cement mixers is so much more fun.

        -Cat-
      • cloakmakerusa
        For zombies, we use a wood rasp and tie it to the trailer hitch for a few miles... The bucket project was a promo movie trailer for Blade of the King 20 T
        Message 3 of 27 , Mar 26 9:11 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          For zombies, we use a wood rasp and tie it to the trailer hitch for a few miles...

          The bucket project was a promo movie trailer for "Blade of the King" 20 T tunics and 20 pair of drawstring pants, 20 cowl hoods, done after sewing so the seams would distress properly...big food service buckets and a 1/2 mile hill (local small ski slope)

          --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...> wrote:
          >
          > >> Fullers earth works great for giving just the right slight dirt to
          > cuffs and collars
          >
          > But it's not really perminate enough even with hairspray. Good for
          > productions but not a long term costume... imho, or is there a new
          > fixative?
          >
          > >> For fading/toning down a color - wash on hot with a new black T
          > shirt and new jeans
          >
          > I'm glad to see I'm not the only one that finds that a good "greying"
          > option. ;-)
          >
          >
          > >> Rolling around in a sealed bucket of sand can take the shine off
          > satin a bit - works like sandpaper, but you can send it down hill by
          > itself. We did 10 buckets on a big hill - drove down, hauled them back
          > up by car - I think 8 or 9 trips did the trick.
          >
          > How many yards of fabric were you working with to have that much fun???
          > What kind of project?
          >
          >
          > Can you tell I love talking distressing whether it's 'loving hands at
          > home' like we did w/ zombies as well last year... but the pro stuff...
          > from sand barrows to cement mixers is so much more fun.
          >
          > -Cat-
          >
        • Jehanni
          ... I was HOPING (but won t be bitterly disappointed if I can t) to fade the blue a bit - so it kind of gets a bit of that look of been washed 10000
          Message 4 of 27 , Mar 30 11:02 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, Naresha <north_shore_fruitcake@...> wrote:
            <snip>I was HOPING (but won't be bitterly disappointed if I can't) to fade the blue a bit - so it kind of gets a bit of that look of "been washed 10000 times"- that greyed out sort of dullness that lighter coloured clothes tend to get when well loved.  I don't want to darken it as such and my capacity for dying things is pretty low right now.<snip>

            In my experience, "tea dyeing" with regular black tea tends to a grayish brown, while coffee lends a more golden brown...however, herbal teas can yield all sorts of tints from pinkish and purplish to greenish and yellow. I can't find the link I used to have about someone's experiments with a wide variety of herbal teas and their resulting colors--sorry!

            What you should know is that tea-dyeing is not necessarily colorfast like commercial dyes, and the acid in the tea can damage some fibers over time.

            But you want to FADE the color--so you're looking for various types of bleaching.

            Depending on your time and climate, spread the fabric out in strong sunshine. This can have a noticiable bleaching effect in just a couple of days on some fabrics. Some royal blue acetate taffeta that my mother gave me is pale puce on the light-faded edges.

            Other accidental bleaching agents I've discovered: "suntan" lotion (I use sunblock, myself--SPF 30 and above) seems to be the culprit on a couple of poly satin costumes, and moisturizer might have caused the streaks on a pale turquoise satin cape.

            I understand acne lotion can be a fabric bleach, but haven't tested it myself.

            I've used lemon juice and sunlight to bleach my hair in summers past.

            Jonatha
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.