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"Wearing" Fabric?

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  • Naresha
    Hi folks, I ve got about 10m (and have a sneaking suspicion I ll need more) of a light blue heavyweight satin for a costume I m working on. I ve sent both
    Message 1 of 27 , Mar 20, 2010
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      Hi folks,

      I've got about 10m (and have a sneaking suspicion I'll need more) of a light blue heavyweight satin for a costume I'm working on. I've sent both lengths of it through the wash three times each and it's softened considerably, but it's still got a lot of new feeling and look to it. 

      Now, I know I can't turn it from a heavy satin into something as flowing as say chiffon, but is there anything I can do to it before I make the costume that will deaden the newness a bit?  I might age/roughen it up SLIGHTY (ie, add some holes, dirt etc) once it's made, but I'm still undecided on that.  The other problem I've got is that whilst I can easily toss it in my washing machine, my washing machine currently only has one temperature setting that works and that is a 40 degree (Celsius) "quick" wash - every other setting (cold included) actually boils the water, so I'm a bit limited in that regard...

      Any suggestions?

      Resha





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Judy Mitchell
      have you run it through the dryer? that often takes a lot of the body out of satins. You might want to stitch the 2 cut ends together into a giant tube first
      Message 2 of 27 , Mar 20, 2010
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        have you run it through the dryer? that often takes a lot of the body
        out of satins. You might want to stitch the 2 cut ends together into a
        giant tube first (basting or zig-zag) - it does two things: keeps the
        fabric from turning into a gordian knot and keeps it amazingly wrinkle
        free, even along the selvages! If you have already run it through the
        dryer and it's still stiff, add a tennis ball or one of those dryer balls.

        -Judy

        Naresha wrote:
        > Hi folks,
        >
        > I've got about 10m (and have a sneaking suspicion I'll need more) of a light blue heavyweight satin for a costume I'm working on. I've sent both lengths of it through the wash three times each and it's softened considerably, but it's still got a lot of new feeling and look to it.
        >
        > Now, I know I can't turn it from a heavy satin into something as flowing as say chiffon, but is there anything I can do to it before I make the costume that will deaden the newness a bit? I might age/roughen it up SLIGHTY (ie, add some holes, dirt etc) once it's made, but I'm still undecided on that. The other problem I've got is that whilst I can easily toss it in my washing machine, my washing machine currently only has one temperature setting that works and that is a 40 degree (Celsius) "quick" wash - every other setting (cold included) actually boils the water, so I'm a bit limited in that regard...
        >
        > Any suggestions?
        >
        > Resha
        >
      • Cat Devereaux
        ... a light blue heavyweight satin for a costume I m working on. I ve sent both lengths of it through the wash three times each and it s softened considerably,
        Message 3 of 27 , Mar 20, 2010
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          > I've got about 10m (and have a sneaking suspicion I'll need more) of
          a light blue heavyweight satin for a costume I'm working on. I've sent
          both lengths of it through the wash three times each and it's softened
          considerably, but it's still got a lot of new feeling and look to it.
          > Now, I know I can't turn it from a heavy satin into something as
          flowing as say chiffon, but is there anything I can do to it before I
          make the costume that will deaden the newness a bit?

          I read this and laughed... It's been two hours and no ones comment this
          time about watching out for my comment (and hide your tennies)

          If you can't used the hot water... you do want to hit the dryer as well
          as the washing machine, and you want to throw stuff in with it. No edge
          stuff, tennis balls and tennis shoes (no velcro, no sharp edges, white
          or faded enough they won't color - thrift store if you don't haven
          them), and a bath towel. Wash/dry, repeat multiple times. This
          beating up loosens up the fibers. You'll probably get a bit of
          shrinkage, but given you've already washed it, not too much more.

          Makes a heck of a difference. It's how I get polly lace to behave like
          the good stuff.

          Satin is too heavy to soften down complete, you heavy beating and abuse
          of your fabric w/ non-sharp stuff really does help.

          Warning: on thin fabrics or lace you can ocationally get a small tear,
          but not often, and you can cut around it unless you've got the bare
          minimum of fabric.

          I subject a lot of my fabric to this.

          -Cat-
        • Naresha
          Yup, put it through the dryer each time I washed it! :)  I ll keep the turning it into a tube idea in my midn for next time - it s come out remarkably wrinkle
          Message 4 of 27 , Mar 20, 2010
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            Yup, put it through the dryer each time I washed it! :)  I'll keep the turning it into a tube idea in my midn for next time - it's come out remarkably wrinkle free - the few wrinkles it has are because I didn't take it out of the dryer soon enough. :P

            Is there anything I can wash/dry it with that might dull some of the shine at all?



            --- On Sun, 21/3/10, Judy Mitchell <judymitch@...> wrote:

            From: Judy Mitchell <judymitch@...>
            Subject: Re: [F-Costume] "Wearing" Fabric?
            To: F-Costume@yahoogroups.com
            Received: Sunday, 21 March, 2010, 2:00 PM







             









            have you run it through the dryer? that often takes a lot of the body

            out of satins. You might want to stitch the 2 cut ends together into a

            giant tube first (basting or zig-zag) - it does two things: keeps the

            fabric from turning into a gordian knot and keeps it amazingly wrinkle

            free, even along the selvages! If you have already run it through the

            dryer and it's still stiff, add a tennis ball or one of those dryer balls.



            -Judy



            Naresha wrote:

            > Hi folks,

            >

            > I've got about 10m (and have a sneaking suspicion I'll need more) of a light blue heavyweight satin for a costume I'm working on. I've sent both lengths of it through the wash three times each and it's softened considerably, but it's still got a lot of new feeling and look to it.

            >

            > Now, I know I can't turn it from a heavy satin into something as flowing as say chiffon, but is there anything I can do to it before I make the costume that will deaden the newness a bit? I might age/roughen it up SLIGHTY (ie, add some holes, dirt etc) once it's made, but I'm still undecided on that. The other problem I've got is that whilst I can easily toss it in my washing machine, my washing machine currently only has one temperature setting that works and that is a 40 degree (Celsius) "quick" wash - every other setting (cold included) actually boils the water, so I'm a bit limited in that regard...

            >

            > Any suggestions?

            >

            > Resha

            >























            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Cat Devereaux
            ... shine at all? Beating it up will take down the shine a bit. It will still have a glow, but the light reflection changes a tad. The fabric goes from
            Message 5 of 27 , Mar 20, 2010
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              >> Is there anything I can wash/dry it with that might dull some of the
              shine at all?

              Beating it up will take down the shine a bit. It will still have a
              glow, but the light reflection changes a tad. The fabric goes from
              "cold" shine to "warm" shine. Hard to explain... but you can see the
              difference.

              -Cat-
            • Naresha
              Good.  I don t want to kill ALL the shine - or else I d have bought something other than satin! - but I do want it to stop looking like it s been buffed and
              Message 6 of 27 , Mar 21, 2010
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                Good.  I don't want to kill ALL the shine - or else I'd have bought something other than satin! - but I do want it to stop looking like it's been buffed and polished to a high gloss!

                How much washing/drying/beating up will it take before I go from cold shine to warm shine?  Or is it all dependent on my washing machine and how many beating up things I put in with it?

                --- On Sun, 21/3/10, Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...> wrote:

                From: Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...>
                Subject: Re: [F-Costume] "Wearing" Fabric?
                To: F-Costume@yahoogroups.com
                Received: Sunday, 21 March, 2010, 4:21 PM







                 









                >> Is there anything I can wash/dry it with that might dull some of the

                shine at all?



                Beating it up will take down the shine a bit. It will still have a

                glow, but the light reflection changes a tad. The fabric goes from

                "cold" shine to "warm" shine. Hard to explain... but you can see the

                difference.



                -Cat-























                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Cat Devereaux
                ... cold shine to warm shine? Or is it all dependent on my washing machine and how many beating up things I put in with it? Well, to get bang for you buck,
                Message 7 of 27 , Mar 21, 2010
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                  >> How much washing/drying/beating up will it take before I go from
                  cold shine to warm shine? Or is it all dependent on my washing machine
                  and how many beating up things I put in with it?

                  Well, to get bang for you buck, you want to let things rattle around in
                  there. One pair of sneakers, or deck shoes or anything that won't
                  fade/snag. Couple of tennis balls (or dryer balls, but tennis balls
                  are cheaper - white not green). Just one towel unless you're only
                  doing a couple yards of fabric, then a 2nd.

                  I do three rounds straight through before I even look at the fabric. If
                  you've got a piece of unwashed fabric you'll see the difference, else it
                  may be tough unless you drape the fabric.

                  Doesn't work in all cases, but I've had amazing luck.


                  Then there's the fun of putting dry-clean-only in a hot wash and dry. I
                  love it! Get cool interesting fabrics. *** Warning, note I said
                  interesting, not what you'd expect.

                  -Cat-
                • Naresha
                  ...   ... I can use the hot water - just can t regulate it. :(  For future reference, (ie, if I ever have enough spare dollars to buy a new one!) what sort
                  Message 8 of 27 , Mar 21, 2010
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                    --- On Sun, 21/3/10, Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...> wrote:







                     

                    >> I've got about 10m (and have a sneaking suspicion I'll need more) of

                    >>a light blue heavyweight satin for a costume I'm working on. I've sent

                    >>both lengths of it through the wash three times each and it's softened

                    >>considerably, but it's still got a lot of new feeling and look to it.

                    >>Now, I know I can't turn it from a heavy satin into something as

                    >>flowing as say chiffon, but is there anything I can do to it before I

                    >>make the costume that will deaden the newness a bit?



                    >I read this and laughed... It's been two hours and no ones comment this

                    >time about watching out for my comment (and hide your tennies)



                    >If you can't used the hot water... you do want to hit the dryer as well

                    >as the washing machine, and you want to throw stuff in with it. No edge

                    >stuff, tennis balls and tennis shoes (no velcro, no sharp edges, white

                    >or faded enough they won't color - thrift store if you don't haven

                    >them), and a bath towel. Wash/dry, repeat multiple times. This

                    >beating up loosens up the fibers. You'll probably get a bit of

                    >shrinkage, but given you've already washed it, not too much more.

                    I can use the hot water - just can't regulate it. :(  For future reference, (ie, if I ever have enough spare dollars to buy a new one!) what sort of temperature is good and/or bad for helping to beat up fabric?I've bunged it through the washer and dryer three times, think one piece might have had a fourth go to.  Don't have any tennies lying around, but I'm sure I can find a pair on the cheap!  Have many bath towels though!


                    >Satin is too heavy to soften down complete, you heavy beating and abuse
                    >of your fabric w/ non-sharp stuff really does help.


                    I don't need it to soften down completely, just kill some of the new that's there. :)


                    >Warning: on thin fabrics or lace you can ocationally get a small tear,

                    >but not often, and you can cut around it unless you've got the bare

                    >minimum of fabric.



                    I'm sure I'll have plenty of fabric to play with - I'm still not 100% sure that I won't need more, I'm not cutting to a specific pattern, so I'm kind of estimating the fabric yardage.  If I need to get more so be it - it wasn't a really expensive fabric and it's not very thin either.  And a little tear here and there might actually be okay with this costume - I'm reproducing the costume of an old vampire that's been buried for a long while, so the dress is meant to look a bit decrepit anyway!
                    Resha







                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Cat Devereaux
                    ... reference, (ie, if I ever have enough spare dollars to buy a new one!) what sort of temperature is good and/or bad for helping to beat up fabric? Honestly,
                    Message 9 of 27 , Mar 21, 2010
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                      >>I can use the hot water - just can't regulate it. :( For future
                      reference, (ie, if I ever have enough spare dollars to buy a new one!)
                      what sort of temperature is good and/or bad for helping to beat up fabric?

                      Honestly, haven't a clue. I started though slash and burn no-budget
                      costuming, so I learned quick how to make whatever fabric I had work as
                      something else. Soften stiff, flat line thin. The only thing I
                      wouldn't abuse in high heat is silk, I'd keep it to medium.

                      BUT I TEST IN ADVANCE to make sure it's not going to get too strange.

                      >> I don't need it to soften down completely, just kill some of the new
                      that's there. :)
                      >> I'm reproducing the costume of an old vampire that's been buried for
                      a long while, so the dress is meant to look a bit decrepit anyway!

                      Oh then you want to run it though a lot.

                      BTW, on the tearing, I prepped the fabric for both sister's wedding
                      dresses this way. Lot more than 3 round, only one slight 1/4 inch in
                      dotted net. Biggest problem could be a catching eyelet. I've got a
                      friend who would tell folks to worry out those eyelets on the old
                      shoes. Told her she could just cut out that strip.

                      For a buried vamp, you're probably going to be playing w/ varying grades
                      of sand paper and paints to add staining at draping points.

                      Warning, if you want all the fabric to look the same, you should abuse
                      it all together. Though I guess it wouldn't matter if you made the
                      skirt of the current batch and the bodice of the next batch. You would
                      not want to make one gore of the skirt out of a separate batch.

                      Oh... and remember to hand it a bit before you hem. Since you've ruffed
                      up the fabric, you want to let the fibers stretch a bit.

                      -Cat-
                    • Naresha
                      ... Excellent!  Well part of this is about playing around and learning the hard way for me, so if I do kill a piece of fabric, it won t be the end of the
                      Message 10 of 27 , Mar 21, 2010
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                        --- On Sun, 21/3/10, Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...> wrote:
                        >>I can use the hot water - just can't regulate it. :( For future

                        >>reference, (ie, if I ever have enough spare dollars to buy a new one!)
                        >>what sort of temperature is good and/or bad for helping to beat up >>fabric?


                        >Honestly, haven't a clue. I started though slash and burn no-budget

                        >costuming, so I learned quick how to make whatever fabric I had work as

                        >something else. Soften stiff, flat line thin. The only thing I
                        >>wouldn't abuse in high heat is silk, I'd keep it to medium.

                        >

                        >BUT I TEST IN ADVANCE to make sure it's not going to get too strange.


                        Excellent!  Well part of this is about playing around and learning the hard way for me, so if I do kill a piece of fabric, it won't be the end of the world - I'm not making this for any specific event so the only constraints are the ones I set on myself.  :)


                        >> I don't need it to soften down completely, just kill some of the new
                        >>that's there. :)

                        >> I'm reproducing the costume of an old vampire that's been buried for
                        >>a long while, so the dress is meant to look a bit decrepit anyway!


                        >Oh then you want to run it though a lot.

                        >

                        >BTW, on the tearing, I prepped the fabric for both sister's wedding
                        >dresses this way. Lot more than 3 round, only one slight 1/4 inch in

                        >dotted net.
                        I think my satin will stand up to it pretty well then, it's solid material.
                        >For a buried vamp, you're probably going to be playing w/ varying >grades of sand paper and paints to add staining at draping points. Sandpaper, I have in spades!  I'm still working on finding some decent shots of the dress to more clearly see what sort of "damage" it has on it.  Unfortunately, it's not a main character, so good shots are hard to come by!  :(


                        >Warning, if you want all the fabric to look the same, you should abuse
                        >it all together. Though I guess it wouldn't matter if you made the
                        >skirt of the current batch and the bodice of the next batch. You would
                        >not want to make one gore of the skirt out of a separate batch.


                        It's a tiered skirt, 3 layers in all I think, but I will definitely toss it all in for abuse - I think it should all fit in the washing machine in one go!  I've washed them separately so far, but that was due to me buying them in 2 separate trips to the shops - having realised after buying the first 5m that I needed more!






                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Cat Devereaux
                        ... the hard way for me, so if I do kill a piece of fabric, it won t be the end of the world Given you re creating the buried un-dead, you can t kill the
                        Message 11 of 27 , Mar 21, 2010
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                          >> >BUT I TEST IN ADVANCE to make sure it's not going to get too strange.

                          >> Excellent! Well part of this is about playing around and learning
                          the hard way for me, so if I do kill a piece of fabric, it won't be the
                          end of the world

                          Given you're creating the buried un-dead, you can't "kill" the fabric
                          too much.

                          >> Sandpaper, I have in spades! I'm still working on finding some
                          decent shots of the dress to more clearly see what sort of "damage" it
                          has on it. Unfortunately, it's not a main character, so good shots are
                          hard to come by! :(

                          Also, look closely at warn clothing. Where are the worn and stained
                          spots, cuffs, collars. If you've been buried a long time w/o moving,
                          the long folks in the dress have a tendency to rot out. So fold down a
                          gather and run sand paper softly down the gathers. Lightest first on
                          biggest area and then nasty stuff where you need more wear. The back
                          would be worse than the front.

                          However, since you're doing a recreation, you want to make it look
                          damaged more like it is, which will be artistic, not realitist.

                          Be careful of seams. Jeans, it's a good play for wear, satin, not on a
                          skirt that has to hold a lot of weight, but OK on the outer bodice
                          fabric. If the bodice is going to be laced tight, be careful to only
                          weaken/damage the top level. You want the underlayers to fully support

                          >> It's a tiered skirt, 3 layers in all I think, but I will definitely
                          toss it all in for abuse - I think it should all fit in the washing
                          machine in one go! I've washed them separately so far, but that was due
                          to me buying them in 2 separate trips to the shops - having realised
                          after buying the first 5m that I needed more!

                          More fabric is always better.

                          Don't forget underpinnning. That way you can really trash the outer
                          layer and show the underlayer.... then use the trashed underlayers as a
                          whole other costume

                          -Cat-
                        • Sarah Strong
                          ... [snip] ... in addition to running it through the machine a bunch of times, if you can manually play with the cycles, just extend one wash cycle over and
                          Message 12 of 27 , Mar 21, 2010
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                            Cat Devereaux wrote:
                            >
                            [snip]
                            >
                            > >> I don't need it to soften down completely, just kill some of the new
                            > that's there. :)
                            > >> I'm reproducing the costume of an old vampire that's been buried for
                            > a long while, so the dress is meant to look a bit decrepit anyway!
                            >
                            > Oh then you want to run it though a lot.
                            >
                            in addition to running it through the machine a bunch of times, if you
                            can manually play with the cycles, just extend one wash cycle over and
                            over, by turning the knob back to the beginning of the cycle before it
                            gets to the drain and spin. Bring a book or magazine or handwork project
                            and sit by the machine, or set a timer for less than the time on the
                            wash cycle. Saves water, which is an issue in some places, or if you pay
                            a water bill based on consumption as I do.
                          • Ann Garner
                            ... Two hours and no one commented and you assume they are watching for your comments? Well, I ve been too busy to mess with email at the moment. I have a
                            Message 13 of 27 , Mar 21, 2010
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                              >
                              >I read this and laughed... It's been two hours and no ones comment this
                              >time about watching out for my comment (and hide your tennies)
                              Two hours and no one commented and you assume they are watching for
                              your comments?
                              Well, I've been too busy to mess with email at the moment. I have a
                              life away from the computer. I also have a job away from the
                              computer. I worked 16 hours Thursday, getting off work at 11pm, then
                              had to get up at 5am the next morning and do a 12 hour shift Friday.
                              Ann in Arkansas
                            • Cat Devereaux
                              ... this time about watching out for my comment (and hide your tennies) ... your comments? Well, I ve been too busy to mess with email at the moment. Ann, it
                              Message 14 of 27 , Mar 21, 2010
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                                >> >I read this and laughed... It's been two hours and no ones comment
                                this time about watching out for my comment (and hide your tennies)

                                > Two hours and no one commented and you assume they are watching for
                                your comments? Well, I've been too busy to mess with email at the moment.

                                Ann, it was a joke... just a joke, but w/ a grain of truth mixed in.
                                Folks do tease me on this list sometimes about how rough I am "prepping"
                                fabric. And the technique itself sounds silly, but it's a very valid
                                and important technique.... and to keep up the 'light' comments on
                                fabric... at least I don't do what the costumers for 'Pirates of the
                                Caribbean' did. They don't just beat the fabric to wear/age it, they
                                rented a cement mixes, complete with rocks, for the pirate's clothing.

                                -Cat-
                              • Jehanni
                                ... ...at least I don t do what the costumers for Pirates of the Caribbean did. They don t just beat the fabric to wear/age it, they rented a cement
                                Message 15 of 27 , Mar 23, 2010
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                                  --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...> wrote:
                                  <snip> ...at least I don't do what the costumers for 'Pirates of the Caribbean' did. They don't just beat the fabric to wear/age it, they rented a cement mixe[r], complete with rocks, for the pirate's clothing.<end snip>

                                  Some writers beat on their characters, some costumers beat on their clothing...**Shrug** whatcha gonna do? **grin**
                                • Oak
                                  We did breaking down at College yesterday. To give an antique colour to fabrics the Costume for Production staff use potassium permanganate, I think its called
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Mar 24, 2010
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                                    We did breaking down at College yesterday.
                                    To give an antique colour to fabrics the Costume for Production staff use
                                    potassium permanganate, I think its called Gentian Violet, used as a
                                    disinfectant.
                                    It dissolves into a vibrant purple solution, but when fabric dipped into it
                                    is rinsed it gives a yellowing affect.
                                    You can do a quick dip for aging white linens and laces, or we did several
                                    swatches over varying amounts of time, after 10 minutes the fabric
                                    (originally white) gave a very aged, almost dipped in tea type
                                    discolouration.
                                    We also spray it into armpits and around colours for that hobo look, its
                                    very realistic ewwww
                                    Another trick we learnt was using florist spray, the yellows and browns can
                                    give patches of dirty colour, damp the fabric a bit if its a hot day.
                                    Good luck!


                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Cat Devereaux
                                    There are all kinds of pro type items to help w/ aging. Tea is something that s in almost everyone s kitchen. Different tea give different colors, from
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Mar 24, 2010
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                                      There are all kinds of pro type items to help w/ aging.

                                      Tea is something that's in almost everyone's kitchen. Different tea
                                      give different colors, from yellows to brown.

                                      When using paints, if you're looking for dirt, getting Burnt Sienna.
                                      Add some fabric medium and lots of water. Gives you a great perminate
                                      color you can paint, dribble, spray

                                      But the coloring is getting into full "aging" of fabric to show wear.

                                      The beat it to pieces w/ the tennies is something I do to fabric before
                                      making wedding and pageant dresses to get a less expensive fabric behave
                                      more like a more expensive or historic fabric.

                                      -Cat-
                                    • Naresha
                                      Is there a way to drain any of the colour out of modern fabrics at all?  I know old fabrics didn t have the vivid colours we have today thanks to the
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Mar 25, 2010
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                                        Is there a way to drain any of the colour out of modern fabrics at all?  I know old fabrics didn't have the vivid colours we have today thanks to the different types of dyes.  Is there any way to speed up the fading process that happens with all the normal washing and wear and tear our clothes get but that tends to take a LONG time?



                                        --- On Thu, 25/3/10, Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...> wrote:

                                        From: Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...>
                                        Subject: Re: [F-Costume] "Wearing" Fabric?
                                        To: F-Costume@yahoogroups.com
                                        Received: Thursday, 25 March, 2010, 12:50 PM







                                         









                                        There are all kinds of pro type items to help w/ aging.



                                        Tea is something that's in almost everyone's kitchen. Different tea

                                        give different colors, from yellows to brown.



                                        When using paints, if you're looking for dirt, getting Burnt Sienna.

                                        Add some fabric medium and lots of water. Gives you a great perminate

                                        color you can paint, dribble, spray



                                        But the coloring is getting into full "aging" of fabric to show wear.



                                        The beat it to pieces w/ the tennies is something I do to fabric before

                                        making wedding and pageant dresses to get a less expensive fabric behave

                                        more like a more expensive or historic fabric.



                                        -Cat-












                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • Cat Devereaux
                                        ... thanks to the different types of dyes. Is there any way to speed up the fading process that happens with all the normal washing and wear and tear our
                                        Message 19 of 27 , Mar 25, 2010
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                                          >> I know old fabrics didn't have the vivid colours we have today
                                          thanks to the different types of dyes. Is there any way to speed up the
                                          fading process that happens with all the normal washing and wear and
                                          tear our clothes get but that tends to take a LONG time?

                                          Ah, correction on colors... just because movies show old as dull and
                                          brown... don't believe it. While they do often get the colors wrong,
                                          that doesn't mean that there weren't bright colors. It depends on time,
                                          place and station.

                                          The Victorians had some amazing analin (sp?) dyes that made those ball
                                          gowns glow in candlelight. They'd also put many of the 60's colors to
                                          shame. Medieval outfits had bright pinks and blues. True they weren't
                                          as color fast. Some colors were very expensive.

                                          Far too much info and I don't have good pages to illustrate what I'm
                                          talking about
                                          http://kremer-pigmente.de/en/naturfarben
                                          http://www.griffindyeworks.com/store/dyes-natural-dyes-and-extracts-c-1_3?zenid=icpfna0qfhl26p2f33jjjkjkc2

                                          I'm sure there are much better links, but I'm not good on historic
                                          fiber. I just know enough to know I don't know much.

                                          >>Is there a way to drain any of the colour out of modern fabrics at all?

                                          Drain??? Need more definition than that.. If you want to take color
                                          out... bleach really will do that. If you want to tone down a color...
                                          overdye works. In LOTR, they've often overdye brighter colors for the
                                          gowns, but much of the mens, was dunked in some kind of a darker wash.
                                          Depends on what color the original is. Is this sun fade??? Earthen??
                                          Varies a lot. Basically answer the questions of time and place? Use?
                                          Station. Are you just trying to tone down a piece of fabric?

                                          White tones down w/ a tea wash or the burnt seina wash I was taking
                                          about. Quick bits, just use paints, whole fabric, you want dyes.

                                          Honestly with modern fabrics that are just too bright, I throw them in
                                          with something new... a couple rounds with a newish pair of black jeans
                                          does wonders. (My grandmother would roll over in her grave if she saw
                                          what I did to get my shirts the colors they are now.) Then again,
                                          historically they would use intense "blue ball" to wash a blue cast onto
                                          whites to "whiten" then.

                                          So... now that you have more information that you need... back to the
                                          original question. When you're making a costume and trying to
                                          transform it... and you ask the question for transforming... what are
                                          you starting with, where you do want to go. When you costume, keep in
                                          mine the character, their station, their location, what they're doing...
                                          all that goes together for a "simple" question.

                                          Just softening the fabric was an easy question.

                                          (ducking now)

                                          -Cat-
                                        • Naresha
                                          By drain I mean fade.  What I have is some satin that s somewhere in the colour region between sky blue and baby blue.  It s a lovely shade, but a bit
                                          Message 20 of 27 , Mar 25, 2010
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            By "drain" I mean fade.  What I have is some satin that's somewhere in the colour region between sky blue and baby blue.  It's a lovely shade, but a bit vibrant - but it was the ONLY fabric even close to the right colour.

                                            I was HOPING (but won't be bitterly disappointed if I can't) to fade the blue a bit - so it kind of gets a bit of that look of "been washed 10000 times"- that greyed out sort of dullness that lighter coloured clothes tend to get when well loved.  I don't want to darken it as such and my capacity for dying things is pretty low right now.

                                            The other problem I have is the character is essentially a non-entity.  It's a non-speaking ensemble character from a musical and they only appear in this costume for less than 15min.  One and a half songs.  And there's no set overall time period - all the vampires are from varying ages.  Makes for one hell of a display of costumes I can tell you!  BUT some nice fans have complied a list of time periods - this costume is listed as 1820-1848, I don't know the English translation of the period name (Biedermeier is the German if anyone knows it)

                                            HAHAH!  I'll settle for softening it, but if it's possible and not ridiculously time consuming and expensive (time and cash poor right now)  I'd like to try playing with the colour modification a bit.



                                            --- On Thu, 25/3/10, Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...> wrote:

                                            From: Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...>
                                            Subject: Re: [F-Costume] "Wearing" Fabric?
                                            To: F-Costume@yahoogroups.com
                                            Received: Thursday, 25 March, 2010, 8:26 PM


                                            >>Is there a way to drain any of the colour out of modern fabrics at all?



                                            Drain??? Need more definition than that.. If you want to take color

                                            out... bleach really will do that. If you want to tone down a color...

                                            overdye works. In LOTR, they've often overdye brighter colors for the

                                            gowns, but much of the mens, was dunked in some kind of a darker wash.

                                            Depends on what color the original is. Is this sun fade??? Earthen??

                                            Varies a lot. Basically answer the questions of time and place? Use?

                                            Station. Are you just trying to tone down a piece of fabric?



                                            White tones down w/ a tea wash or the burnt seina wash I was taking

                                            about. Quick bits, just use paints, whole fabric, you want dyes.



                                            Honestly with modern fabrics that are just too bright, I throw them in

                                            with something new... a couple rounds with a newish pair of black jeans

                                            does wonders. (My grandmother would roll over in her grave if she saw

                                            what I did to get my shirts the colors they are now.) Then again,

                                            historically they would use intense "blue ball" to wash a blue cast onto

                                            whites to "whiten" then.



                                            So... now that you have more information that you need... back to the

                                            original question. When you're making a costume and trying to

                                            transform it... and you ask the question for transforming. .. what are

                                            you starting with, where you do want to go. When you costume, keep in

                                            mine the character, their station, their location, what they're doing...

                                            all that goes together for a "simple" question.



                                            Just softening the fabric was an easy question.



                                            (ducking now)



                                            -Cat-

























                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          • Cat Devereaux
                                            ... in the colour region between sky blue and baby blue. It s a lovely shade, but a bit vibrant - but it was the ONLY fabric even close to the right colour. I
                                            Message 21 of 27 , Mar 25, 2010
                                            • 0 Attachment
                                              >> By "drain" I mean fade. What I have is some satin that's somewhere
                                              in the colour region between sky blue and baby blue. It's a lovely
                                              shade, but a bit vibrant - but it was the ONLY fabric even close to the
                                              right colour. I was HOPING (but won't be bitterly disappointed if I
                                              can't) to fade the blue a bit - so it kind of gets a bit of that look of
                                              "been washed 10000 times"- that greyed out sort of dullness that lighter
                                              coloured clothes tend to get when well loved. I don't want to darken it
                                              as such and my capacity for dying things is pretty low right now.

                                              You're answering part of your own question... (teaching how to recognize
                                              it), you mention wanting to go to grey.... your other option would be
                                              yellowish which often happens to fabrics. But, greyish will be prettier
                                              for the blue.

                                              Professionally, they'd overdye. Which is often a quick dip in a regular
                                              dye. It doesn't give the fiber too long to take suck in the color, so
                                              you get just a "hint".

                                              If you wanted to yellow - tea would have worked on blue.

                                              You also mention budget. Do you have a new black anything???
                                              Seriously. However, you're working against 10 yards of fabric, if I
                                              remember correctly... so it would be very subtle, but might be enough.
                                              Wash the fabric with your dark laundry a few times.

                                              As to what dye would work best for the greying??? Something you could
                                              get locally? There's rit, but most of the black dyes go towards
                                              bluish-purple, so I'm not sure if it would make it brighter until you
                                              went darker. (BTW, if you're just dipping for an over dye, you won't
                                              know the true color until it's dry.) Same concept on greys.

                                              (Can you tell I'm thinking and typing??? Beyond aging, quick and dirty,
                                              I'm out of my depth.... and admit it.)

                                              Ya know, it can't hurt to try what teas you have in your house. Boil up
                                              different teas, let sit in pots and steap. Dip samples. Label. Let
                                              dry. See if it's too yellow for you.

                                              TEST,. TEST. TEST

                                              Anyone else have sugestions for cheap grey (or not had ritt's black and
                                              grey be too blue?)

                                              >>this costume is listed as 1820-1848, I don't know the English
                                              translation of the period name (Biedermeier is the German if anyone
                                              knows it)

                                              Oh.... giant crazy sleeves, high waists. Very silly period. Too many
                                              petticoats (they hadn't gone to hoops yet. Tip there.. in the petty
                                              coats, use cotton cord/rope in the lower layers, sews it in tight
                                              channels. http://www.historicallydressed.com/research/cordedpetticoats.html


                                              One general tip when making historical fantasy... spend a little extra
                                              time, make the undergarments historically correct. (And it's normally
                                              easier, because you often work from squares anyway, measurements, not a
                                              bought pattern.) That way, besides your current outfit, you're building
                                              the bits to start a historical wardrobe. And, while you may be able to
                                              "cheat" fantasy, historic garments, to look right, need to have the
                                              underpinnings right. Just think, save time later, have a better look
                                              now, and more costumes.

                                              -Cat-
                                            • Alyson
                                              I think that the tea concept may be good. I would try Lipton first as the tannins are lower and then work up to a good strong Black tea. Make sure you do a
                                              Message 22 of 27 , Mar 25, 2010
                                              • 0 Attachment
                                                I think that the tea concept may be good. I would try Lipton first as the tannins are lower and then work up to a good strong Black tea. Make sure you do a small swatch. You can also dye with tea in the bathtub. Adding in Walnut shells can also help as it creates. Run a very very hot bath put in walnut shells and soak. Then run hot and soak fabric. I would put some vinegar in there also or salt. The only problem with 10 yards in the washing machine with a new black...something...is that it can act like the red shirt that hides in your whites (why we never see it is beyond me) and then streaks the colour instead of just turning it pink.
                                                ~Kemper


                                                Life is meant to be an adventure; change is a gift that we have to learn to use aright. A Celtic curse is to be stuck in a field and unable to leave. To be stuck in one place forever.
                                                To be unable to venture or change.
                                                An open gate is the opposite of this. It is the invitation to venture, to grow, the call to be among the living vital elements of the world.
                                                The open gate is the call to explore new areas of yourself
                                                and the world around you
                                                ~David Adam,The Open Gate~





                                                ________________________________
                                                From: Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...>
                                                To: F-Costume@yahoogroups.com
                                                Sent: Thu, March 25, 2010 1:27:58 PM
                                                Subject: Re: [F-Costume] "Wearing" Fabric?


                                                >> By "drain" I mean fade. What I have is some satin that's somewhere
                                                in the colour region between sky blue and baby blue. It's a lovely
                                                shade, but a bit vibrant - but it was the ONLY fabric even close to the
                                                right colour. I was HOPING (but won't be bitterly disappointed if I
                                                can't) to fade the blue a bit - so it kind of gets a bit of that look of
                                                "been washed 10000 times"- that greyed out sort of dullness that lighter
                                                coloured clothes tend to get when well loved. I don't want to darken it
                                                as such and my capacity for dying things is pretty low right now.

                                                You're answering part of your own question... (teaching how to recognize
                                                it), you mention wanting to go to grey.... your other option would be
                                                yellowish which often happens to fabrics. But, greyish will be prettier
                                                for the blue.

                                                Professionally, they'd overdye. Which is often a quick dip in a regular
                                                dye. It doesn't give the fiber too long to take suck in the color, so
                                                you get just a "hint".

                                                If you wanted to yellow - tea would have worked on blue.

                                                You also mention budget. Do you have a new black anything???
                                                Seriously. However, you're working against 10 yards of fabric, if I
                                                remember correctly... so it would be very subtle, but might be enough.
                                                Wash the fabric with your dark laundry a few times.

                                                As to what dye would work best for the greying??? Something you could
                                                get locally? There's rit, but most of the black dyes go towards
                                                bluish-purple, so I'm not sure if it would make it brighter until you
                                                went darker. (BTW, if you're just dipping for an over dye, you won't
                                                know the true color until it's dry.) Same concept on greys.

                                                (Can you tell I'm thinking and typing??? Beyond aging, quick and dirty,
                                                I'm out of my depth.... and admit it.)

                                                Ya know, it can't hurt to try what teas you have in your house. Boil up
                                                different teas, let sit in pots and steap. Dip samples. Label. Let
                                                dry. See if it's too yellow for you.

                                                TEST,. TEST. TEST

                                                Anyone else have sugestions for cheap grey (or not had ritt's black and
                                                grey be too blue?)

                                                >>this costume is listed as 1820-1848, I don't know the English
                                                translation of the period name (Biedermeier is the German if anyone
                                                knows it)

                                                Oh.... giant crazy sleeves, high waists. Very silly period. Too many
                                                petticoats (they hadn't gone to hoops yet. Tip there.. in the petty
                                                coats, use cotton cord/rope in the lower layers, sews it in tight
                                                channels. http://www.historic allydressed. com/research/ cordedpetticoats .html

                                                One general tip when making historical fantasy... spend a little extra
                                                time, make the undergarments historically correct. (And it's normally
                                                easier, because you often work from squares anyway, measurements, not a
                                                bought pattern.) That way, besides your current outfit, you're building
                                                the bits to start a historical wardrobe. And, while you may be able to
                                                "cheat" fantasy, historic garments, to look right, need to have the
                                                underpinnings right. Just think, save time later, have a better look
                                                now, and more costumes.

                                                -Cat-




                                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                              • Alyson
                                                Walnuts can create a black stain...sorry Life is meant to be an adventure; change is a gift that we have to learn to use aright. A Celtic curse is to be stuck
                                                Message 23 of 27 , Mar 25, 2010
                                                • 0 Attachment
                                                  Walnuts can create a black stain...sorry


                                                  Life is meant to be an adventure; change is a gift that we have to learn to use aright. A Celtic curse is to be stuck in a field and unable to leave. To be stuck in one place forever.
                                                  To be unable to venture or change.
                                                  An open gate is the opposite of this. It is the invitation to venture, to grow, the call to be among the living vital elements of the world.
                                                  The open gate is the call to explore new areas of yourself
                                                  and the world around you
                                                  ~David Adam,The Open Gate~





                                                  ________________________________
                                                  From: Alyson <tolkienscholar@...>
                                                  To: F-Costume@yahoogroups.com
                                                  Sent: Thu, March 25, 2010 4:30:45 PM
                                                  Subject: Re: [F-Costume] "Wearing" Fabric?


                                                  I think that the tea concept may be good. I would try Lipton first as the tannins are lower and then work up to a good strong Black tea. Make sure you do a small swatch. You can also dye with tea in the bathtub. Adding in Walnut shells can also help as it creates. Run a very very hot bath put in walnut shells and soak. Then run hot and soak fabric. I would put some vinegar in there also or salt. The only problem with 10 yards in the washing machine with a new black...something. ..is that it can act like the red shirt that hides in your whites (why we never see it is beyond me) and then streaks the colour instead of just turning it pink.
                                                  ~Kemper

                                                  Life is meant to be an adventure; change is a gift that we have to learn to use aright. A Celtic curse is to be stuck in a field and unable to leave. To be stuck in one place forever.
                                                  To be unable to venture or change.
                                                  An open gate is the opposite of this. It is the invitation to venture, to grow, the call to be among the living vital elements of the world.
                                                  The open gate is the call to explore new areas of yourself
                                                  and the world around you
                                                  ~David Adam,The Open Gate~

                                                  ____________ _________ _________ __
                                                  From: Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@ AlleyCatScratch. com>
                                                  To: F-Costume@yahoogrou ps.com
                                                  Sent: Thu, March 25, 2010 1:27:58 PM
                                                  Subject: Re: [F-Costume] "Wearing" Fabric?

                                                  >> By "drain" I mean fade. What I have is some satin that's somewhere
                                                  in the colour region between sky blue and baby blue. It's a lovely
                                                  shade, but a bit vibrant - but it was the ONLY fabric even close to the
                                                  right colour. I was HOPING (but won't be bitterly disappointed if I
                                                  can't) to fade the blue a bit - so it kind of gets a bit of that look of
                                                  "been washed 10000 times"- that greyed out sort of dullness that lighter
                                                  coloured clothes tend to get when well loved. I don't want to darken it
                                                  as such and my capacity for dying things is pretty low right now.

                                                  You're answering part of your own question... (teaching how to recognize
                                                  it), you mention wanting to go to grey.... your other option would be
                                                  yellowish which often happens to fabrics. But, greyish will be prettier
                                                  for the blue.

                                                  Professionally, they'd overdye. Which is often a quick dip in a regular
                                                  dye. It doesn't give the fiber too long to take suck in the color, so
                                                  you get just a "hint".

                                                  If you wanted to yellow - tea would have worked on blue.

                                                  You also mention budget. Do you have a new black anything???
                                                  Seriously. However, you're working against 10 yards of fabric, if I
                                                  remember correctly... so it would be very subtle, but might be enough.
                                                  Wash the fabric with your dark laundry a few times.

                                                  As to what dye would work best for the greying??? Something you could
                                                  get locally? There's rit, but most of the black dyes go towards
                                                  bluish-purple, so I'm not sure if it would make it brighter until you
                                                  went darker. (BTW, if you're just dipping for an over dye, you won't
                                                  know the true color until it's dry.) Same concept on greys.

                                                  (Can you tell I'm thinking and typing??? Beyond aging, quick and dirty,
                                                  I'm out of my depth.... and admit it.)

                                                  Ya know, it can't hurt to try what teas you have in your house. Boil up
                                                  different teas, let sit in pots and steap. Dip samples. Label. Let
                                                  dry. See if it's too yellow for you.

                                                  TEST,. TEST. TEST

                                                  Anyone else have sugestions for cheap grey (or not had ritt's black and
                                                  grey be too blue?)

                                                  >>this costume is listed as 1820-1848, I don't know the English
                                                  translation of the period name (Biedermeier is the German if anyone
                                                  knows it)

                                                  Oh.... giant crazy sleeves, high waists. Very silly period. Too many
                                                  petticoats (they hadn't gone to hoops yet. Tip there.. in the petty
                                                  coats, use cotton cord/rope in the lower layers, sews it in tight
                                                  channels. http://www.historic allydressed. com/research/ cordedpetticoats .html

                                                  One general tip when making historical fantasy... spend a little extra
                                                  time, make the undergarments historically correct. (And it's normally
                                                  easier, because you often work from squares anyway, measurements, not a
                                                  bought pattern.) That way, besides your current outfit, you're building
                                                  the bits to start a historical wardrobe. And, while you may be able to
                                                  "cheat" fantasy, historic garments, to look right, need to have the
                                                  underpinnings right. Just think, save time later, have a better look
                                                  now, and more costumes.

                                                  -Cat-

                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                • cloakmakerusa
                                                  Fullers earth works great for giving just the right slight dirt to cuffs and collars For fading/toning down a color - wash on hot with a new black T shirt and
                                                  Message 24 of 27 , Mar 25, 2010
                                                  • 0 Attachment
                                                    Fullers earth works great for giving just the right slight dirt to cuffs and collars

                                                    For fading/toning down a color - wash on hot with a new black T shirt and new jeans

                                                    Rolling around in a sealed bucket of sand can take the shine off satin a bit - works like sandpaper, but you can send it down hill by itself. We did 10 buckets on a big hill - drove down, hauled them back up by car - I think 8 or 9 trips did the trick.

                                                    Dina

                                                    --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, Naresha <north_shore_fruitcake@...> wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > By "drain" I mean fade.  What I have is some satin that's somewhere in the colour region between sky blue and baby blue.  It's a lovely shade, but a bit vibrant - but it was the ONLY fabric even close to the right colour.
                                                    >
                                                    > I was HOPING (but won't be bitterly disappointed if I can't) to fade the blue a bit - so it kind of gets a bit of that look of "been washed 10000 times"- that greyed out sort of dullness that lighter coloured clothes tend to get when well loved.  I don't want to darken it as such and my capacity for dying things is pretty low right now.
                                                    >
                                                    > The other problem I have is the character is essentially a non-entity.  It's a non-speaking ensemble character from a musical and they only appear in this costume for less than 15min.  One and a half songs.  And there's no set overall time period - all the vampires are from varying ages.  Makes for one hell of a display of costumes I can tell you!  BUT some nice fans have complied a list of time periods - this costume is listed as 1820-1848, I don't know the English translation of the period name (Biedermeier is the German if anyone knows it)
                                                    >
                                                    > HAHAH!  I'll settle for softening it, but if it's possible and not ridiculously time consuming and expensive (time and cash poor right now)  I'd like to try playing with the colour modification a bit.
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > --- On Thu, 25/3/10, Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...> wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > From: Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...>
                                                    > Subject: Re: [F-Costume] "Wearing" Fabric?
                                                    > To: F-Costume@yahoogroups.com
                                                    > Received: Thursday, 25 March, 2010, 8:26 PM
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > >>Is there a way to drain any of the colour out of modern fabrics at all?
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > Drain??? Need more definition than that.. If you want to take color
                                                    >
                                                    > out... bleach really will do that. If you want to tone down a color...
                                                    >
                                                    > overdye works. In LOTR, they've often overdye brighter colors for the
                                                    >
                                                    > gowns, but much of the mens, was dunked in some kind of a darker wash.
                                                    >
                                                    > Depends on what color the original is. Is this sun fade??? Earthen??
                                                    >
                                                    > Varies a lot. Basically answer the questions of time and place? Use?
                                                    >
                                                    > Station. Are you just trying to tone down a piece of fabric?
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > White tones down w/ a tea wash or the burnt seina wash I was taking
                                                    >
                                                    > about. Quick bits, just use paints, whole fabric, you want dyes.
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > Honestly with modern fabrics that are just too bright, I throw them in
                                                    >
                                                    > with something new... a couple rounds with a newish pair of black jeans
                                                    >
                                                    > does wonders. (My grandmother would roll over in her grave if she saw
                                                    >
                                                    > what I did to get my shirts the colors they are now.) Then again,
                                                    >
                                                    > historically they would use intense "blue ball" to wash a blue cast onto
                                                    >
                                                    > whites to "whiten" then.
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > So... now that you have more information that you need... back to the
                                                    >
                                                    > original question. When you're making a costume and trying to
                                                    >
                                                    > transform it... and you ask the question for transforming. .. what are
                                                    >
                                                    > you starting with, where you do want to go. When you costume, keep in
                                                    >
                                                    > mine the character, their station, their location, what they're doing...
                                                    >
                                                    > all that goes together for a "simple" question.
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > Just softening the fabric was an easy question.
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > (ducking now)
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > -Cat-
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                    >
                                                  • Cat Devereaux
                                                    ... cuffs and collars But it s not really perminate enough even with hairspray. Good for productions but not a long term costume... imho, or is there a new
                                                    Message 25 of 27 , Mar 25, 2010
                                                    • 0 Attachment
                                                      >> Fullers earth works great for giving just the right slight dirt to
                                                      cuffs and collars

                                                      But it's not really perminate enough even with hairspray. Good for
                                                      productions but not a long term costume... imho, or is there a new
                                                      fixative?

                                                      >> For fading/toning down a color - wash on hot with a new black T
                                                      shirt and new jeans

                                                      I'm glad to see I'm not the only one that finds that a good "greying"
                                                      option. ;-)


                                                      >> Rolling around in a sealed bucket of sand can take the shine off
                                                      satin a bit - works like sandpaper, but you can send it down hill by
                                                      itself. We did 10 buckets on a big hill - drove down, hauled them back
                                                      up by car - I think 8 or 9 trips did the trick.

                                                      How many yards of fabric were you working with to have that much fun???
                                                      What kind of project?


                                                      Can you tell I love talking distressing whether it's 'loving hands at
                                                      home' like we did w/ zombies as well last year... but the pro stuff...
                                                      from sand barrows to cement mixers is so much more fun.

                                                      -Cat-
                                                    • cloakmakerusa
                                                      For zombies, we use a wood rasp and tie it to the trailer hitch for a few miles... The bucket project was a promo movie trailer for Blade of the King 20 T
                                                      Message 26 of 27 , Mar 26, 2010
                                                      • 0 Attachment
                                                        For zombies, we use a wood rasp and tie it to the trailer hitch for a few miles...

                                                        The bucket project was a promo movie trailer for "Blade of the King" 20 T tunics and 20 pair of drawstring pants, 20 cowl hoods, done after sewing so the seams would distress properly...big food service buckets and a 1/2 mile hill (local small ski slope)

                                                        --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, Cat Devereaux <CatDevereaux@...> wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        > >> Fullers earth works great for giving just the right slight dirt to
                                                        > cuffs and collars
                                                        >
                                                        > But it's not really perminate enough even with hairspray. Good for
                                                        > productions but not a long term costume... imho, or is there a new
                                                        > fixative?
                                                        >
                                                        > >> For fading/toning down a color - wash on hot with a new black T
                                                        > shirt and new jeans
                                                        >
                                                        > I'm glad to see I'm not the only one that finds that a good "greying"
                                                        > option. ;-)
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        > >> Rolling around in a sealed bucket of sand can take the shine off
                                                        > satin a bit - works like sandpaper, but you can send it down hill by
                                                        > itself. We did 10 buckets on a big hill - drove down, hauled them back
                                                        > up by car - I think 8 or 9 trips did the trick.
                                                        >
                                                        > How many yards of fabric were you working with to have that much fun???
                                                        > What kind of project?
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        > Can you tell I love talking distressing whether it's 'loving hands at
                                                        > home' like we did w/ zombies as well last year... but the pro stuff...
                                                        > from sand barrows to cement mixers is so much more fun.
                                                        >
                                                        > -Cat-
                                                        >
                                                      • Jehanni
                                                        ... I was HOPING (but won t be bitterly disappointed if I can t) to fade the blue a bit - so it kind of gets a bit of that look of been washed 10000
                                                        Message 27 of 27 , Mar 30, 2010
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                                                          --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, Naresha <north_shore_fruitcake@...> wrote:
                                                          <snip>I was HOPING (but won't be bitterly disappointed if I can't) to fade the blue a bit - so it kind of gets a bit of that look of "been washed 10000 times"- that greyed out sort of dullness that lighter coloured clothes tend to get when well loved.  I don't want to darken it as such and my capacity for dying things is pretty low right now.<snip>

                                                          In my experience, "tea dyeing" with regular black tea tends to a grayish brown, while coffee lends a more golden brown...however, herbal teas can yield all sorts of tints from pinkish and purplish to greenish and yellow. I can't find the link I used to have about someone's experiments with a wide variety of herbal teas and their resulting colors--sorry!

                                                          What you should know is that tea-dyeing is not necessarily colorfast like commercial dyes, and the acid in the tea can damage some fibers over time.

                                                          But you want to FADE the color--so you're looking for various types of bleaching.

                                                          Depending on your time and climate, spread the fabric out in strong sunshine. This can have a noticiable bleaching effect in just a couple of days on some fabrics. Some royal blue acetate taffeta that my mother gave me is pale puce on the light-faded edges.

                                                          Other accidental bleaching agents I've discovered: "suntan" lotion (I use sunblock, myself--SPF 30 and above) seems to be the culprit on a couple of poly satin costumes, and moisturizer might have caused the streaks on a pale turquoise satin cape.

                                                          I understand acne lotion can be a fabric bleach, but haven't tested it myself.

                                                          I've used lemon juice and sunlight to bleach my hair in summers past.

                                                          Jonatha
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