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Re: [F-Costume] Re: Decorating vinyl

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  • Cat Devereaux
    ... how much textile art I do. They re just acrilic paint with medium in them. The nice thing is that it works just the opposite way too. Any time I need a
    Message 1 of 11 , Jan 25, 2009
      >> Duhh, I totally didn't think of trying fabric paints. Lol, you can see
      how much textile art I do.

      They're just acrilic paint with medium in them. The nice thing is that
      it works just the opposite way too. Any time I need a more brilliant
      color than the light fluffy stuff you get in regular bottles, I mix up
      my own. It's the stuff I use for foam core all the time.

      The only problem, that sticky thickness of the medium is the same thing
      that in heat or long term storage cause acrilic paints to sometimes
      stick to themselves or plastic. I just store layers carefully. (My
      foam collar lasted years in the garage w/ no stick problem just packed
      carefully.)

      >> I've been wanting an excuse to buy some
      more of those Lumiere paints, so now I have one!

      Those or Golden are the top beasties. For the crafty projects I do, I
      keep a full range of their colors in the little craft bottles. I keep
      mixes and metallics in the tubs and thin/mix as need for other colors.
      I keep a good range of mediums or sometimes just water. Seal your
      custom mixes in those little mini cups and your custom mix will last
      near forever. (I know. I still have far to much "Strawberry Cream
      Frosting" from my nieces project 3 years ago.)

      However, when possible, it's best to buy your color because it's hard to
      match later for touchup since wet and dry look different. Do make
      notes. Saves you later on the patch up.

      -Cat-
    • jehanni2
      ... Another thing that might be interesting, though likely less permanent than the Lumiere paints, is the glass paint they formulate for making stained glass
      Message 2 of 11 , Jan 25, 2009
        --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, "Tea Rose" <tearoses@...> wrote:
        >
        > Duhh, I totally didn't think of trying fabric paints.

        Another thing that might be interesting, though likely less permanent
        than the Lumiere paints, is the glass paint they formulate for
        making "stained glass" designs. It is flexible--in fact, there are now
        instructions for painting thickly on plastic wrap or wax paper to make
        your own window clings--but it is generally intended to be transparent
        rather than opaque, it might be too flexible, and it might be not
        sturdy enough to take scuffing.

        It's always worth trying out the properties of new tools. ;-)
      • Cat Devereaux
        ... making stained glass designs. It is flexible--in fact, there are now instructions for painting thickly on plastic wrap or wax paper to make your own
        Message 3 of 11 , Jan 25, 2009
          >> glass paint they formulate for
          making "stained glass" designs. It is flexible--in fact, there are now
          instructions for painting thickly on plastic wrap or wax paper to make
          your own window clings--but it is generally intended to be transparent
          rather than opaque, it might be too flexible, and it might be not
          sturdy enough to take scuffing.

          Totally tearable plastic. It's meant not to adhere to a surface, beyond
          temp that is. Larger molecules... and you're right, even the dark
          colors are transparent.

          -Cat-
        • Johanna Breijer
          No! No! No! The fact that they are clings should tip you off that these remain sticky. They are fragile, and completely unsuitable for anything permenant.
          Message 4 of 11 , Jan 26, 2009
            No! No! No!
            The fact that they are clings should tip you off that these remain
            sticky. They are fragile, and completely unsuitable for anything
            permenant. Have tried using them at a client's insistance with vinyl.
            The stuff pealed off just during fittings. It was way too easy to
            remove to start again from scratch.
            Johanna Breijer.
            --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, "jehanni2" <jehanni2@...> wrote:
            >
            > --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, "Tea Rose" <tearoses@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Duhh, I totally didn't think of trying fabric paints.
            >
            > Another thing that might be interesting, though likely less permanent
            > than the Lumiere paints, is the glass paint they formulate for
            > making "stained glass" designs. It is flexible--in fact, there are
            now
            > instructions for painting thickly on plastic wrap or wax paper to
            make
            > your own window clings--but it is generally intended to be
            transparent
            > rather than opaque, it might be too flexible, and it might be not
            > sturdy enough to take scuffing.
            >
            > It's always worth trying out the properties of new tools. ;-)
            >
          • Johanna Breijer
            Hi Been painting vinyl for over twenty years. I ll start with products to avoid. Jones tones fabric paint. Horrible stuff. Stays sticky, and peels off any
            Message 5 of 11 , Jan 26, 2009
              Hi
              Been painting vinyl for over twenty years. I'll start with products
              to avoid. Jones tones fabric paint. Horrible stuff. Stays sticky,
              and peels off any surface.
              Color Steps - vinyl paints developed for painting shoes. Stays
              sticky, never dries not even here in the desert climate.

              Stuff that works well every time: For metallics: Ultra Gloss
              Metallics by Decoart. Use a couple of thin coats and build up the
              colour. Seal with FolkArt Waterbase Varnish. Satin Finish. Gloss
              in any varnish or paint will stay sticky. Made by Plaid. Slightly
              smelly(when wet). Will seal well in two thin coats.
              Use the sticky Jones tones to adhere metal leaf or metal foil in a
              wide range of colours and effects. Seal with varnish. You can get
              cheap plastic hologram wrapping paper from the dollar store. Test
              first to see if the hologram with adhere to the sticky jones tones
              paint and seperate from the plastic. This can be varnished and
              treated as you would metal leaf or metal foil.
              Creatix Pearlized Airbrush Colors has some nice 2 tone pearlized
              paints. Use thin coats of application and seal.
              For solid colours any non glossy acrylic based paint will do. Seal
              it with varnish.
              The main trick to painting on vinyl is to do it in multipul thin
              coats. A thick coat cracks over time. I always use the same varnish
              sealer as mentioned above. I haven't tried the Lumiere paints on
              vinyl yet. They work great on leather and suede. Pebo Porceline
              works well but hasn't been available locally for years. The other
              paints mentioned can be found in Micheals and Walmart. The other
              paint I use a lot is sceneic paint from Paramount.
              Johanna Breijer AKA K'Put
              --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, "Tea Rose" <tearoses@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi all,
              >
              > I have an old vinyl suitcase that I would like to make into a BJD
              > case, and I figured if anyone knew what you can do to vinyl, it'd be
              > you guys. The suitcase is covered in some really thick, nice vinyl
              > (I'm pretty sure it's vinyl and not actually leather), but it's
              > cow-hide brown.
              >
              > I searched the archive and found the recommendation to look at the
              > auto parts place for upholstery dye, and I may do that, but I would
              > also like to do something more fancy, like paint it with a stencil.
              > I'm concerned because it's so flexible (the interior is cardboard
              and
              > it has warped a bit over the years, so the vinyl on the outside
              isn't
              > held flat and tight) that I think craft paint would flake off. So
              what
              > kind of paint do you recommend? And what can I seal it with that
              won't
              > crack? I have Testor's in dullcote and gloss, will that work? Or
              what
              > about Future acrylic floor polish? I want it to be really tough.
              >
              > Thanks!
              > Tea Rose
              >
            • jehanni2
              So, to recap from Johanna and Cat s experience: If you want to make temporary, translucent travel stamps/customs label clings for your bjd s travel case, use
              Message 6 of 11 , Jan 27, 2009
                So, to recap from Johanna and Cat's experience:

                If you want to make temporary, translucent travel stamps/customs label
                clings for your bjd's travel case, use stained glass paint--but other
                than that, it's a no-go.

                lol! See how useful a group like this is?
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