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Re: [F-Costume] Rouching a bodice Test strips?

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  • Melody Watts
    She may decide she doesn t like the look after see it. Any marks put in velvet tend to stay visible. I would maybe try thinking in an applicae mode perhaps
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 1, 2009
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      She may decide she doesn't like the look after see it. Any marks put in velvet tend to stay visible. I would maybe try thinking in an applicae mode perhaps make some test strips of ruching  and add this way ,no alteration on original bodice.
      velvet is so pretty but what a pain!

      " But, WHY, is the Rum all gone?"

      --- On Sat, 12/27/08, Alyson <tolkienscholar@...> wrote:

      From: Alyson <tolkienscholar@...>
      Subject: [F-Costume] Rouching a bodice
      To: F-Costume@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, December 27, 2008, 8:24 AM






      I am creating a medieval fantasy wedding dress for my daughter. She would like the bodice rouched a little bit. How do I rouch a bodice that originally does not call for it? Also, can I rouch any type of fabric? I wouldn't think that velvet would rouch well.
      Thanks!
      Kemper

      Life is meant to be an adventure; change is a gift that we have to learn to use aright. A Celtic curse is to be stuck in a field and unable to leave. To be stuck in one place forever.
      To be unable to venture or change.
      An open gate is the opposite of this. It is the invitation to venture, to grow, the call to be among the living vital elements of the world.
      The open gate is the call to explore new areas of yourself
      and the world around you
      ~David Adam,The Open Gate~

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Alyson
      Well, thankfully, she changed her mind from velvet to silk. She still wants the rouching though. I do love velvet, but I think velvet is one of those fabrics
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 1, 2009
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        Well, thankfully, she changed her mind from velvet to silk. She still wants the rouching though. I do love velvet, but I think velvet is one of those fabrics that speaks for itself and needs little to embellish it. :)
        Kemper


        Life is meant to be an adventure; change is a gift that we have to learn to use aright. A Celtic curse is to be stuck in a field and unable to leave. To be stuck in one place forever.
        To be unable to venture or change.
        An open gate is the opposite of this. It is the invitation to venture, to grow, the call to be among the living vital elements of the world.
        The open gate is the call to explore new areas of yourself
        and the world around you
        ~David Adam,The Open Gate~





        ________________________________
        From: Melody Watts <hobbitmomof4@...>
        To: F-Costume@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, January 1, 2009 2:08:58 PM
        Subject: Re: [F-Costume] Rouching a bodice Test strips?


        She may decide she doesn't like the look after see it. Any marks put in velvet tend to stay visible. I would maybe try thinking in an applicae mode perhaps make some test strips of ruching and add this way ,no alteration on original bodice.
        velvet is so pretty but what a pain!

        " But, WHY, is the Rum all gone?"

        --- On Sat, 12/27/08, Alyson <tolkienscholar@ yahoo.com> wrote:

        From: Alyson <tolkienscholar@ yahoo.com>
        Subject: [F-Costume] Rouching a bodice
        To: F-Costume@yahoogrou ps.com
        Date: Saturday, December 27, 2008, 8:24 AM

        I am creating a medieval fantasy wedding dress for my daughter. She would like the bodice rouched a little bit. How do I rouch a bodice that originally does not call for it? Also, can I rouch any type of fabric? I wouldn't think that velvet would rouch well.
        Thanks!
        Kemper

        Life is meant to be an adventure; change is a gift that we have to learn to use aright. A Celtic curse is to be stuck in a field and unable to leave. To be stuck in one place forever.
        To be unable to venture or change.
        An open gate is the opposite of this. It is the invitation to venture, to grow, the call to be among the living vital elements of the world.
        The open gate is the call to explore new areas of yourself
        and the world around you
        ~David Adam,The Open Gate~

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Sarah
        whew, that s going to make it a lot easier. Another cool thing you can do with some silks, is to vary the grain from lengthwise to crosswise or bias, each of
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 1, 2009
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          whew, that's going to make it a lot easier.
          Another cool thing you can do with some silks, is to vary the grain
          from lengthwise to crosswise or bias, each of which are apt to catch
          the light differently. If you are backing each panel with on-grain
          organza for stability, you don't have to worry about unwanted stretch.
          I saw a wonderful book years ago about Barbara Karinska, who designed
          costumes for the NYC Ballet, showing these gorgeous faceted jewel-like
          bodices made with panels of silk not all on the straight.
          http://files.blog-city.com/files/A06/49559761/p/f/bsq1.jpg
          all I could find in a quick on line search, not as good as what's in
          the book, but you can see that the center fronts are on grain and the
          side fronts are on the bias.
          Just another possibility to toss into the mix!
          S

          --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, Alyson <tolkienscholar@...> wrote:
          >
          > Well, thankfully, she changed her mind from velvet to silk. She
          still wants the rouching though. I do love velvet, but I think velvet
          is one of those fabrics that speaks for itself and needs little to
          embellish it. :)
          > Kemper
          >
        • Alyson
          Thanks! I love the way the light catches differently. I ll have to play around and see what happens. I m working on the muslin right now. Isn t there a way to
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 2, 2009
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            Thanks! I love the way the light catches differently. I'll have to play around and see what happens. I'm working on the muslin right now. Isn't there a way to make the skirt one piece?


            Life is meant to be an adventure; change is a gift that we have to learn to use aright. A Celtic curse is to be stuck in a field and unable to leave. To be stuck in one place forever.
            To be unable to venture or change.
            An open gate is the opposite of this. It is the invitation to venture, to grow, the call to be among the living vital elements of the world.
            The open gate is the call to explore new areas of yourself
            and the world around you
            ~David Adam,The Open Gate~





            ________________________________
            From: Sarah <sarahstrong13@...>
            To: F-Costume@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, January 1, 2009 8:29:40 PM
            Subject: [F-Costume] Re: Rouching a bodice Test strips?


            whew, that's going to make it a lot easier.
            Another cool thing you can do with some silks, is to vary the grain
            from lengthwise to crosswise or bias, each of which are apt to catch
            the light differently. If you are backing each panel with on-grain
            organza for stability, you don't have to worry about unwanted stretch.
            I saw a wonderful book years ago about Barbara Karinska, who designed
            costumes for the NYC Ballet, showing these gorgeous faceted jewel-like
            bodices made with panels of silk not all on the straight.
            http://files. blog-city. com/files/ A06/49559761/ p/f/bsq1. jpg
            all I could find in a quick on line search, not as good as what's in
            the book, but you can see that the center fronts are on grain and the
            side fronts are on the bias.
            Just another possibility to toss into the mix!
            S

            --- In F-Costume@yahoogrou ps.com, Alyson <tolkienscholar@ ...> wrote:
            >
            > Well, thankfully, she changed her mind from velvet to silk. She
            still wants the rouching though. I do love velvet, but I think velvet
            is one of those fabrics that speaks for itself and needs little to
            embellish it. :)
            > Kemper
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Sarah Strong
            Depends on the skirt!
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 2, 2009
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              Depends on the skirt!

              Alyson wrote:
              >
              >
              > Thanks! I love the way the light catches differently. I'll have to play
              > around and see what happens. I'm working on the muslin right now. Isn't
              > there a way to make the skirt one piece?
              >
            • jehanni2
              ... I think velvet is one of those fabrics that speaks for itself and needs little to embellish it. :) Though you re not working in velvet any
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 10, 2009
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                --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, Alyson <tolkienscholar@...> wrote:
                <<snip>> I think velvet is one of those fabrics that speaks for itself
                and needs little to embellish it. :)<<snip>>

                Though you're not working in velvet any more, I can't resist
                commenting. I do love "plain" velvet. I also think ruched velvet can
                be enticing because of the different angles catching the light in
                different ways: it can give a luxurious fabric even more dimensionality.

                This isn't the best photo, but the overgown I'm wearing--and the top
                half of my purse--is crossdyed and figured velvet that is smocked in a
                3-dimensional basketweave pattern using a technique called lattice or
                North American smocking.

                http://www.flickr.com/photos/12460636@N05/2873080616/sizes/l/in/set-72157607390984398/

                Lattice smocking also looks lovely in silks, because the sheen of the
                fabric catches the light at different angles, too. For some people,
                simplicity is its own virtue. For others, or at other times,
                complexity can be spectacular.
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