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Re: Silk Dupioni After Washing....Gone Soft?

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  • rookwoods
    ... yes, that happens when you wash it. It also loses a little of it s lustre and gets a tad grainier . just adds character! although that s what usually
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 27 5:13 PM
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      --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, "darth_eagle" <darth_eagle@...> wrote:
      >
      > I recently washed the Silk Dupioni I'm gonna use for my Lucy Red
      > Dress Bodice (from CoN: Prince Caspian) and had just iron it when I
      > noticed that the fabric is now soft. o__O
      >
      > Is it suppose to be this way?

      yes, that happens when you wash it. It also loses a little of
      it's lustre and gets a tad 'grainier'. just adds character! although
      that's what usually happens with machine washing.


      > As for ironing, I initially used the prescribed temperature
      > recommanded for Silk (Level 2) on my Dry Iron but later changed to
      > one meant between Rayon and Cotton (Level 3-5) with water mist before
      > ironing.

      Did the ironing bring some of it back? it often does -
      although not quite as crisp as originally.

      >
      >
      > And another question about Silk Dupioni:
      > How do you totally get rid of the "Wrinkled" look of it after
      > washing? Should I be using Steam Iron instead?
      >
      hmm, I kinda like the 'grainy/wrinkled' look. I know I've
      heard some people comment about vinegar for an ironing spritz... but
      check that on a scrap because I'm not positive if they said they use
      it on silk or on linen!!!! so use a scrap first. Steam, at least,
      should help. I use steam on my tunic.

      -Judy
    • darth_eagle
      ... Am okay with the lack of lustre as Lucy s Bodice isn t that shiny like how Silk Dupioni is like fresh from the shop. That s why I tried using semi-hot
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 28 12:18 AM
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        <judymitch@...> wrote:
        > yes, that happens when you wash it. It also loses a little of
        > it's lustre and gets a tad 'grainier'. just adds character! although
        > that's what usually happens with machine washing.

        Am okay with the lack of lustre as Lucy's Bodice isn't that shiny
        like how Silk Dupioni is like fresh from the shop. That's why I tried
        using semi-hot (almost warm) water as some said it'll get rid of the
        lustre a bit.

        I guess I ended up with that cause I wring(sp?) it dry to get rid of
        the excess water? :-P Weather is unpredictable these days, one moment
        very sunny, the next raining so want to put it to dry in the sun asap
        that day.


        > Did the ironing bring some of it back? it often does -
        > although not quite as crisp as originally.

        No actually, it just become softer. Or maybe I should had iron it
        with those Starch Spray?

        One thing for sure, the washing get rid of the incense smell as I
        gotten it from an Indian Shop and with over 100 colors at hand, I dun
        think the fabrics are moving out that fast.


        > hmm, I kinda like the 'grainy/wrinkled' look. I know I've
        > heard some people comment about vinegar for an ironing spritz... but
        > check that on a scrap because I'm not positive if they said they use
        > it on silk or on linen!!!! so use a scrap first. Steam, at least,
        > should help. I use steam on my tunic.

        Okiday. Will try it out. -__^

        Guess about time I get a Steam Iron since I need it to make that
        Beauxbatons Hat too.

        Thanks ^__^

        Fatimah
      • Judy Mitchell
        ... oh yeah, wringing it out will put big, broomstick creases in it! ... while I know people for thousands of years have been hanging out the wash to dry,
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 28 5:42 AM
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          darth_eagle wrote:

          > I guess I ended up with that cause I wring(sp?) it dry to get rid of
          > the excess water?

          oh yeah, wringing it out will put big, 'broomstick' creases in it!


          :-P Weather is unpredictable these days, one moment
          > very sunny, the next raining so want to put it to dry in the sun asap
          > that day.
          >
          while I know people for thousands of years have been hanging out the
          wash to dry, just one thing to remember: fabric left in the sun for very
          long will fade! even left in your car where the sunlight goes through
          the window can ruin the color. That's why it's great for whites (and
          called 'sun bleaching')

          -judy
        • jehanni2
          ... A couple of random thoughts on air-drying fabrics: In my experience, hanging fabric out to dry on an outdoor clothesline (as compared to hanging indoors
          Message 4 of 5 , May 1, 2008
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            --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, Judy Mitchell <judymitch@...> wrote:
            > darth_eagle wrote:
            > > I guess I ended up with that cause I wring(sp?) it dry to get rid of
            > > the excess water?
            > oh yeah, wringing it out will put big, 'broomstick' creases in it!

            A couple of random thoughts on air-drying fabrics:

            In my experience, hanging fabric out to dry on an outdoor clothesline
            (as compared to hanging indoors over your bathtub, say) tends to
            result in slightly less wrinkling if you have a breeze: the wind
            constantly fluttering the cloth will shake out some wrinkles. To
            duplicate this effect inside, consider pointing an electric fan at
            your hanging fabric,and adjust the speed until you get a nice
            ripple--not flapping. Blowing your fabric may stretch some fibers a
            bit. It also dries most yardage MUCH faster than just hanging.

            --Try to hang fabric in the shade, not the direct sun, to avoid
            excessive sun-bleaching (as Judy said). Some dyes will show
            significant effects in just one exposure, some not for a while.
            --How you pin matters: You will still have one big crease if you tent
            the fabric over your clothesline, and hang an equal amount of weight
            on both sides.
            --You may have little pinches where your clothespins catch the fabric.
            --There may be rules/laws in your neighborhood/town/city about when
            and where laundry can be hung. Check if you're not sure.
            --When I was in Christchurch, New Zealand 25 years ago, my flatmates
            (and all our neighbors) mostly hung their laundry outside: why waste
            the electricity to dry it? But in the winter, most people still heated
            with coal, so laundry left out to long in the winter had black spots
            from the coal ash! While this may give you an nice "period" effect,
            consider what kinds of particulates your local air has before hanging
            out your precious silks. ;-)
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