Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Kesa for Miroku

Expand Messages
  • Bernadette
    Greetings. I am new here. Did a quick archive search and did not see any refernces to this. My daughter wants to go to Marcon as Miroku from the Inuyasha anime
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 27, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Greetings. I am new here. Did a quick archive search and did not see
      any refernces to this.

      My daughter wants to go to Marcon as Miroku from the Inuyasha anime
      series. I can handle most of the garb but can't seem to find info on
      how to put on a buddist monk's robe. I discovered it is called a kesa.
      It seems to be a simple retangle of cloth but I am not positive it
      doesn't have additional ties sewn on to it.

      The main problem is I can not find any info on how it is worn and tied
      together. Does anyone know?

      Thanks
      Bernadette
    • Cat Devereaux
      I did some googling for you. No direct how to. It seems to be more of an art than a science. Tips for googling for things like this in general. Start with
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 27, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        I did some googling for you. No direct how to. It seems to be more of
        an art than a science. Tips for googling for things like this in
        general. Start with "how to wear a XXX". Then look at things they
        describe, I found better links by also trying "how to fold", how to
        knot, tie, etc Use word clues to find more googling info.

        Found a bit talking about the ties:
        http://www.geocities.com/mokuraibozu/garb_text.html

        Wrapping here:
        http://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/buddhistworld/robe_txt.htm & more
        http://www.hsuyun.org/Dharma/zbohy/Columns/TurbidRevelations/VestedInterests.html

        Not sure if this is the right style:
        http://gudoblog-e.blogspot.com/2007/11/rakusu-chodai-kesa-no-ge.html

        Though this person hasn't bogged much lately, they've got a very clear
        layout of how to make the basics. They might know how to wear it as
        well: http://nyohoekesa.blogspot.com/2006_03_01_archive.html

        -Cat-
      • E H
        I crafted the orange ones from long pieces of cloth for a musical once. As these were brief appearances in monk costume, I simply tied the top corners over
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 29, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          I crafted the orange ones from long pieces of cloth for a musical once. As
          these were brief appearances in monk costume, I simply tied the top corners
          over the shoulder and the actors threw them over what they were already
          wearing (it didn't matter that their other costumes were visible). Since
          this seems to be a primary part of the Miroku costume, search the following
          page for the kesa. It describes how to fasten it properly over/under the
          shoulder though I would recommend somehow sewing the sides closed for the
          costume. Some pictures of Miroku seem to show it goes around the neck.
          Depending on the type of fabric you use, you could use the top corners as
          ties which is what I did.
          http://collectionsonline.lacma.org/mweb/about/cost_about.asp

          Enjoy.
          bhc

          On Sun, Apr 27, 2008 at 7:23 AM, Bernadette <bernadettets@...> wrote:

          > Greetings. I am new here. Did a quick archive search and did not see
          > any refernces to this.
          >
          > My daughter wants to go to Marcon as Miroku from the Inuyasha anime
          > series. I can handle most of the garb but can't seem to find info on
          > how to put on a buddist monk's robe. I discovered it is called a kesa.
          > It seems to be a simple retangle of cloth but I am not positive it
          > doesn't have additional ties sewn on to it.
          >
          > The main problem is I can not find any info on how it is worn and tied
          > together. Does anyone know?
          >
          > Thanks
          > Bernadette
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.