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  • Corbyjane Troya
    Does anyone have any idea what colour the costumes (primarily the screentest and finale dresses) are in the 1933 picture? I m horrible with black and white...
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 31, 2006
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      Does anyone have any idea what colour the costumes (primarily the screentest
      and finale dresses) are in the 1933 picture? I'm horrible with black and
      white... I have no idea! I know they're white, according to Cat, but is this
      a creamy white, blue white, etc... does anyone know if there are colour
      pictures of the costumes existing somewhere?
      Thanks,
      Corbyjane

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    • Cat Devereaux
      ... screen-test and finale dresses) are in the 1933 picture? I m horrible with black and white... I have no idea! I know they re white, according to Cat, but
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 1, 2006
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        >>Does anyone have any idea what color the costumes (primarily the
        screen-test
        and finale dresses) are in the 1933 picture? I'm horrible with black and
        white... I have no idea! I know they're white, according to Cat, but is this

        a creamy white, blue white, etc... does anyone know if there are color
        pictures of the costumes existing somewhere?


        The thing to remember about B&W color... the filmmakers aim for "perceived
        color". In another movie there's a famous "scarlet" dress that actually is
        emerald green. The green was picked because it read on screen as a decedent
        red. (I think the movie is named Jezebel, but not sure.)

        Screen color read is less about the hue (color) and more about everything
        else that makes up color - brightness, saturation, reflective index, etc.
        Add film stock chosen and colors get weirder.

        Actually, the same thing happens today... even in cases where a dress is
        suppose to be white, it will often be over dyed so that it doesn't shine too
        much as white. In LOTR, Gladdy's gowns get a quick dip in green to take
        down the glow and add detail. You wouldn't want to do that green dip if you
        were recreating.

        Other movies make "black" costumes out of various grays, or use creams to
        real a calming white.

        The problem with King Kong, some of the lobby cards are hand painted tinted
        yellow and other pink... but that's just to pop the adds... so it gets a bit
        crazy. I haven't been able to trace down color reference... but I'm always
        open to documenting what others can find.

        In the Finale dress
        http://www.alleycatscratch.com/movie/kong/1933/Ann/Finale.htm , there's a
        lot of contrast between the beading and fabric... so the "white" is a tad
        more on the dark side, like cream, or a green or whatever worked to allow
        the beads to shine but keep the dress from glowing.

        The Screen Test dress,
        http://www.alleycatscratch.com/movie/kong/1933/Ann/Ship.htm#Screen_Test , is
        another high shine dress... so the color is toned down again to prevent a
        glow. When her arm is raised to cover her eyes notice that the fabric still
        white-out flair.

        Probably the best example of pure white is directly below the Screen Test
        dress, just scroll down and look at "Trouble". However, that dress is made
        from a matt fabric so it can be whiter w/o any burning flaring.

        Hope that makes some sense.

        -Cat-
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