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RE: [F-Costume] Unhemmed chiffon Q

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  • Cat Devereaux
    ... of my chiffon fabric to be unhemmed. What kind of product should i use to keep it from unraveling? It s silk chiffon, so I d want something compatable
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 7, 2006
      >>Hello all, I need advice. I'm making a costume that requires the edges
      of my chiffon fabric to be unhemmed. What kind of product should i use
      to keep it from unraveling? It's silk chiffon, so I'd want something
      compatable w/that. Does anyone have any prefs? Thanks!



      If it was polly chiffon, I'd say use a hot knife to cut the edges. However,
      silk isn't going to work with a hot knife. It won't melt the same way.



      Why does it really have to be unhemmed???? I'd say put a fine zig-zag on
      the edge, do a fairly narrow zig-zag and close up the length of the stitch.
      Stitch with the needle centered right on the edge of the fabric. If you've
      got foot with the little bar that's used for the fake overlock (J-foot on a
      Viking). This makes a very clean little edge, doesn't show. Does give the
      edge some body though. Try different widths of zigs-zags



      There's a temp solution, you can brush it with fray check. I wouldn't
      squirt fray check on directly. That will really glob the edge and make it
      very stiff. However, I get lots of wax paper and lay the edges down. Put
      the fray check in a little cup and evenly brush. Make sure it's dry before
      the next layer goes on. You get a glob of fray check in the wrong place and
      it leave a perminate stain.. This will wash out after a while.



      On both of these techniques... test with your fabrics. You'll have a bit
      of change on the hem with both of them. TEST



      -Cat-





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • mellymel_hsv
      ... You know, quite honestly, I never got around to hemming my Arwen Dream gown (it s 100% silk chiffon). I ve worn it several times and never had a problem
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 7, 2006
        --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, "Cillista" <Bloodofthereaper@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello all, I need advice. I'm making a costume that requires the edges
        > of my chiffon fabric to be unhemmed. What kind of product should i use
        > to keep it from unraveling? It's silk chiffon, so I'd want something
        > compatable w/that. Does anyone have any prefs? Thanks!
        >
        > Cillista
        >


        You know, quite honestly, I never got around to hemming my Arwen Dream
        gown (it's 100% silk chiffon). I've worn it several times and never
        had a problem with it raveling much.

        Otherwise, I'd suggest a lingerie hem, or just a zig-zag on the edge
        as was already suggested.

        Love and Light,
        Mel
      • Cillista
        Thanks for the info guys. The reason I needed to leave it unhemmed is because the edges are all uneven and need to have a tattered appearance so I didn t think
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 7, 2006
          Thanks for the info guys. The reason I needed to leave it unhemmed is
          because the edges are all uneven and need to have a tattered
          appearance so I didn't think it would be possible to hem something
          like that and retain the dishevelled torn look. I'll tryit though. How
          bad does chiffon tend to unravel, I've worked with silk jacquards and
          habotais before and they were bad about it. Thanks.

          Cillista
        • jehanni2
          ... wrote: You might also try not hemming but
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 7, 2006
            --- In F-Costume@yahoogroups.com, "Cillista" <Bloodofthereaper@...>
            wrote:
            <<I needed to leave it unhemmed...because the edges are all uneven and
            need to have a tattered appearance....>>

            You might also try not hemming but stay-stitching: that is, running a
            line of straight stitching inside the edge, echoing the tatters. Then,
            when it ravels, the stay-stitching will (mostly) stop the raveling
            from traveling too far. You can experiment with scraps to see how far
            you like the ravels to run: a narrow 1/4-inch stay-stitch won't allow
            much fringing of threads; a deeper 1-inch will allow the edge
            to "bloom" the way some boucle, Chanel style jackets do. This
            technique is also similar to the quilter's and wearable artist's
            faux "cheneille" effect, though usually cheneille involves multiple
            layers to give a fuller fringe.

            Jonatha
          • Cat Devereaux
            ... because the edges are all uneven and need to have a tattered appearance Ah, extra info. Sounds like Brush on fray check and the wax paper trick. Again
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 7, 2006
              >> The reason I needed to leave it unhemmed is
              because the edges are all uneven and need to have a tattered
              appearance



              Ah, extra info. Sounds like Brush on fray check and the wax paper trick.
              Again reminding you to let each section dry. The time I had a big chunk to
              do (was brushing a dust ruffle for my sisters wedding dress I just spread
              half a carton out on the patio and laid out the fabric then paint and
              crawled. Worked well even if my mom though I was nuts. And it's held up to
              the abused.



              >> How
              bad does chiffon tend to unravel, I've worked with silk jacquards and
              habotais before and they were bad about it.



              Is this suppose to be an artsy tear.... or if it's suppose to be really worn
              and torn tearing... the threads and junk would look authentic.



              This is one case where the polly chiffon would have simplified the issue,
              the hot knife is what the dance companies use to get those looks (if they're
              not using net or tulle). Hey, but that's a next time thing.



              -Cat-



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Cillista
              To the suggestion of putting one line of stitching- That sounds good although wouldn t the one stitch line show and look kinda funny? Thanks Cat I ll try the
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 7, 2006
                To the suggestion of putting one line of stitching- That sounds good
                although wouldn't the one stitch line show and look kinda funny?

                Thanks Cat I'll try the fray check as well. I'd have gotten poly, BUT
                i'm dyeing the peices different colors and even though I could get
                white poly and dye it, it's a lot more difficult and my guess is
                slightly more expensive dyes to do so. So I think i'll stick to what I
                know.

                Thanks for all the tips, I have quite a few to try out!

                Cillista
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