Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Resubmission With Byline Included

Expand Messages
  • Bonnie Jo Davis
    Article Submission Detail: Article Title: Try A New Whole Grain This Week! Author Name: Gretchen Scalpi, RD, CDE Contact Email Address:
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 27, 2014
      Article Submission Detail:

      Article Title: Try A New Whole Grain This Week!
      Author Name: Gretchen Scalpi, RD, CDE
      Contact Email Address: nutritionxpertarticles@...
      Word Count: 483
      Suggested Category: health
      Keywords: whole grains,buckwheat,buckwheat flour,soba noodles,gluten-free,high fiber food,healthy meals
      Description: Do you eat the same grains over and over each week? Consider trying a new whole grain... buckwheat. Learn how buckwheat is prepared and why it is so good for you especially if you are on a gluten-free diet.
      Copyright Date: 2014

      You have permission to publish this article in your ezine or on your web site, free of charge, as long as the byline and the article is included in it's entirety. If you use the article you are required to activate any links found in the article and the by-line. You may not use this article in any publication that is not-optin (spam).

      Complete Article with Resource Box at end:

      Try A New Whole Grain This Week!

      Most of us eat the same grains over and over again: pasta, rice, and wheat. How about trying a new whole grain in place of one of your old standbys? One whole grain that we think is really worth a try is buckwheat. Japan, China and Korea have been cultivating buckwheat for over 1,000 years and a favorite food item soba noodles made with buckwheat has become very popular in the United States.

      Buckwheat flour is commonly added to commercial pancake mix and this is how most people even know of its existence. However, buckwheat is much more than just an addition to a breakfast pancakes. In its lesser known forms, there are many health and nutritional benefits that could make buckwheat a wonderful addition to a "whole foods" diet. Contrary to its name, buckwheat is not a form of wheat at all.

      Whole buckwheat is a very nutritious food. The protein in buckwheat contains the eight essential amino acids. Buckwheat is also rich in many B vitamins as well as phosphorus, magnesium, iron, zinc, copper and manganese, and has Alpha-Linolenic Acid, which is one of the two essential fatty acids we must have in our diets.

      In addition to its nutritional value, there are a few health benefits that make this food worth your consideration:

      * Buckwheat is a high fiber food. 1 cup of cooked buckwheat groats contains over 4 grams of dietary fiber.
      * Because it is high in fiber and has a low glycemic load, and is a good carbohydrate choice for people with diabetes.
      * Many grains lack protein but buckwheat has more than corn, wheat or rice.
      * Diets that contain buckwheat have been linked to lowered risk of developing high cholesterol and high blood pressure.
      * Buckwheat is is a gluten-free alternative to grains, which makes it a healthful grain alternative for people with celiac disease or wheat sensitivity.

      Buckwheat Groats: hulled grains of buckwheat, triangular in shape and resembles other grains. The seeds from buckwheat can be used to make flour after being removed from the husk.

      Buckwheat Kasha: kasha, or roasted hulled buckwheat kernels, may be sold whole or cracked. You may find it ground into coarse, medium, or fine consistencies. The variety you use will depend on the consistency you need for the dish you are preparing. Buckwheat groats and the roasted version, kasha are usually cooked in a manner similar to cooking rice. Either can be used to make hot cereal, added to soups or casseroles, or used as a side dish.

      You can find an abundance of recipes in cookbooks and on the internet that include buckwheat so now is the time for you to start adding it to your diet!

      © 2014 Gretchen Scalpi. All rights reserved. You are free to reprint/republish this article as long as the article and byline are kept intact and all links are made live.

      Gretchen Scalpi is a Registered Dietitian, Certified Diabetes Educator and Certified Wellcoach®. She is the author of "The EVERYTHING Guide to Managing and Reversing Pre-Diabetes 2nd Ed.", "The EVERYTHING Diabetes Cookbook 2nd Ed.", "Virtual Grocery Store Tour: Getting The Most Nutrition Out Of Your Food Shopping", "Pre-Diabetes: Your Second Chance At Health", "The Quick Start Guide to Healthy Eating", "The Quick Start Guide To Pre-Diabetes" and "Quick Start Recipes For Healthy Meals". Read her articles, recipes and blog at http://www.nutritionxpert.com and learn more about her books at http://www.gretchenscalpi.com
    • Bonnie Jo Davis
      Article Submission Detail: Article Title: Five Hidden Sources Of Gluten Author Name: Gretchen Scalpi, RD, CDE Contact Email Address:
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 28, 2014
        Article Submission Detail:

        Article Title: Five Hidden Sources Of Gluten

        Author Name: Gretchen Scalpi, RD, CDE
        Contact Email Address: nutritionxpertarticles@...
        Word Count: 423
        Suggested Category: health
        Keywords: gluten-free,gluten-free diet,celiac disease,coelic disease
        Description: Are you on a gluten-free diet? If you are then you need to read this article to learn how gluten can be hiding in unexpected places in your kitchen.
        Copyright Date: 2014

        You have permission to publish this article in your ezine or on your web site, free of charge, as long as the byline and the article is included in it's entirety. If you use the article you are required to activate any links found in the article and the by-line. You may not use this article in any publication that is not-optin (spam).

        Complete Article with Resource Box at end:

        Five Hidden Sources Of Gluten


        The gluten free diet has become very popular for many people. Trendy products in supermarkets, and gluten free menu items can now be found everywhere. Anyone who wants to follow a gluten free lifestyle now has the ability to find more than enough choices. But for people who must follow a gluten free regime for life because of a medical condition, gluten avoidance goes beyond merely choosing foods known to be gluten free. One needs to be extra vigilant about avoiding all sources of gluten. Unfortunately, gluten may be lurking in places that one would never imagine. Even meticulous attention to the finer details of gluten avoidance may not prevent incidental exposure to gluten from other places.

        Here's my list of hidden gluten sources which can cross contaminate safe and otherwise gluten free foods:

        1. The toaster: If your toaster was previously used for toasting wheat products, this is a source of gluten contamination. It is impossible to clean out the inside of a toaster adequately. Purchase a separate toaster that is used solely for the purpose of toasting gluten free breads or muffins. Alternatively, if you have a toaster oven with a removable tray that can be thoroughly cleaned, you may use that to toast the gluten free bread.

        2. Flour sifters: The mesh screen found in flour sifters or mesh strainers are difficult to clean. For the gluten free kitchen, these items should be replaced.

        3. Wooden cutting boards, spoons, spatulas: Wood is porous and if used with wheat products previously, small particles of gluten remain in the wood, despite cleaning.

        4. Colanders are often used to drain pasta. The small holes in colanders are difficult to clean and get completely free of gluten.

        5. Peanut butter, jam, or mayonnaise are just a few examples of foods that are spread on bread. Knives that come in contact with bread and then go back into a jar will contaminate the spread. Purchase separate jars of each, then label "gluten free" for the person who needs to avoid gluten.

        If you have been maintaining the gluten free diet for a while, yet still experience symptoms, dig a little deeper to see whether you are exposed to gluten from a "hidden" source. In addition to the suggestions I’ve listed here, don’t forget to check your medicine cabinet, vitamin, and mineral supplements as well!

        © 2014 Gretchen Scalpi. All rights reserved. You are free to reprint/republish this article as long as the article and byline are kept intact and all links are made live.

        Gretchen Scalpi is a Registered Dietitian, Certified Diabetes Educator and Certified Wellcoach®. She is the author of "The EVERYTHING Guide to Managing and Reversing Pre-Diabetes 2nd Ed.", "The EVERYTHING Diabetes Cookbook 2nd Ed.", "Virtual Grocery Store Tour: Getting The Most Nutrition Out Of Your Food Shopping", "Pre-Diabetes: Your Second Chance At Health", "The Quick Start Guide to Healthy Eating", "The Quick Start Guide To Pre-Diabetes" and "Quick Start Recipes For Healthy Meals". Read her articles, recipes and blog at http://www.nutritionxpert.com and learn more about her books at http://www.gretchenscalpi.com
      • Bonnie Jo Davis
        Article Submission Detail: Article Title: Strategies to Help You Stick With a Healthy Eating Plan for Life Author Name: Gretchen Scalpi, RD, CDE Contact Email
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 10, 2014
          Article Submission Detail:

          Article Title: Strategies to Help You Stick With a Healthy Eating Plan for Life

          Author Name: Gretchen Scalpi, RD, CDE
          Contact Email Address:
          Word Count: 428
          Suggested Category: health
          Keywords:  Gretchen Scalpi,healthy eating,nutrition,goal setting,weight loss,lose weight,bad habits,diet,how to lose weight
          Description:  We've all been there.  We start a healthy eating plan with the best of intentions but ultimately we don't stick with it.  Here are five strategies to help you make your healthy eating habits stick this time.
          Copyright Date: 2014

          You have permission to publish this article in your ezine or on your web site, free of charge, as long as the byline and the article is included in it's entirety.  If you use the article you are required to activate any links found in the article and the by-line.  You may not use this article in any publication that is not-optin (spam).

          Complete Article with Resource Box at end:

          Strategies to Help You Stick With a Healthy Eating Plan for Life


          How many times have you started a healthy eating plan only to have your good intentions gradually slip away? When that happens, you may find yourself back where you started and frustrated with your lack of ability to keep on track. Most people know how to eat right, but maintaining what you have started is another matter. Here are five strategies to help you make healthy eating habits stick.

          Set Reasonable, Attainable Goals:

          Decide what your most important goals are and write them down. Goals need to be specific and measurable. Spell out what you will do, how often and when.

          Learn From Others:

          Changing lifestyle habits are often easier said than done. One way to come up with goals that will work for you is to discuss your goals with a nutrition professional. Choose someone with the experience and educational credentials that makes them a nutrition expert, such as a Registered Dietitian.

          Keep a Journal:

          When learning new skills, write down what you are doing. Keep a written journal of what you eat and review your journal at least once daily. Writing it down as you go lets you know exactly what you are eating and gives you quick insight into what areas need improvement.

          Accept that you will have some setbacks:

          It's human nature to revert back to old behaviors, especially when social occasions or unexpected events occur. Accept the fact that sometimes life gets in the way of your plans! Don't take the "all or nothing" outlook, and feel as though you have failed simply because you had a setback. If you have a setback, decide upon a time in the very near future to resume you plan, then just start again.

          Check in with your progress:

          The only way to know how well you are doing, is to keep track of your progress and see how far you have come. Besides keeping a food journal, it can be helpful to make a list of the improvements you have actually made along the way. Seeing your "improvement list" validates all the little things you have already done and is a great way to keep yourself motivated.

          People that have a well thought out strategy for making healthy lifestyle changes are the ones who realize success. Lifestyle changes take time, but a systematic approach will help you maintain what you have changed. Give it a try!

          © 2014 Gretchen Scalpi. All rights reserved. You are free to reprint/republish this article as long as the article and byline are kept intact and all links are made live.

          Gretchen Scalpi is a Registered Dietitian, Certified Diabetes Educator and Certified Wellcoach®. She is the author of "The EVERYTHING Guide to Managing and Reversing Pre-Diabetes 2nd Ed.", "The EVERYTHING Diabetes Cookbook 2nd Ed.", "Virtual Grocery Store Tour: Getting The Most Nutrition Out Of Your Food Shopping", "Pre-Diabetes: Your Second Chance At Health", "The Quick Start Guide to Healthy Eating", "The Quick Start Guide To Pre-Diabetes" and "Quick Start Recipes For Healthy Meals".  Read her articles, recipes and blog at http://www.nutritionxpert.com and learn more about her books at http://www.gretchenscalpi.com.

        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.