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Business Etiquette Resolutions

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  • Bonnie Jo Davis
    Article Submission Detail: Article Title: Business Etiquette Resolutions Author Name: Lydia Ramsey Contact Email Address: lydia@mannersthatsell.com Word Count:
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 4 1:45 PM
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      Article Submission Detail:

      Article Title: Business Etiquette Resolutions
      Author Name: Lydia Ramsey
      Contact Email Address: lydia@...
      Word Count: 639
      Suggested Category: business
      Keywords: Lydia Ramsey,business etiquette,protocol,manners,customer service
      Description: Do you want to grow your business this year, attract more customers, keep your current ones and increase your bottom line? If you answered "yes" to any of those, here are the top ten business etiquette recommendations from professional speaker Lydia Ramsey.
      Copyright Date: 2012

      You have permission to publish this article in your ezine or on your web site, free of charge, as long as the byline and the article is included in it's entirety. If you use the article you are required to activate any links found in the article and the by-line. You may not use this article in any publication that is not-optin (spam).

      Complete Article with Resource Box at end:

      Business Etiquette Resolutions

      Do you want to grow your business this year, attract more customers, keep your current ones and increase your bottom line? If you answered "yes" to any of those, here are my top ten business etiquette recommendations for you.

      1. Be on time for meetings, presentations, workshops and networking events. People who habitually arrive late send a clear message that their time is more important than everyone else's. They develop a poor reputation, and they miss out on information and opportunity. Keep in mind that if you are not five minutes early, you're late.

      2. Pay more attention to your professional attire. Resolve to dress like the polished business person you are. People do judge you by your appearance. Your 9-5 wardrobe should be different from your after five clothing.

      3. Send more handwritten notes. Take a few extra minutes when someone does something nice for you and write a thank you note. You can send an email message of appreciation, but follow it with the written one. You'll stand out from the crowd of your competitors.

      4. Be more tolerant of people from other cultures. Our business world is shrinking, and we find ourselves connecting with people from all over the globe. Take time to read up on international etiquette so you can understand and appreciate cultural differences.

      5. Call people by name. Using names in conversation makes others feel valued and acknowledged. However, make sure you are addressing them correctly. Don't assume that "William" wants to be called "Bill" or that your new business client wants to be addressed by first name. Wait until Ms. Brown asks you to call her Mary. Until she does, use her title and last name.

      6. Resolve to use the phone more often. We live in a world of email. Some people think that it is the only way to communicate. Email is intended to transmit information quickly and efficiently. It does not build relationships. Make sure you take the time to talk to
      your customers, particularly about complicated or sensitive issues.

      7. Be dependable. Say what you will do and do what you said. Your credibility will go right down the tube if you promise but don't deliver. The same goes for deadlines. If you promise to have the project done by Monday, do it. If you find there are obstacles to meeting that deadline, alert the other person.

      8. Use your cell phone with courtesy and respect for others. By now everyone should know to turn that phone off in meetings or at least put it on silent ringer and never take a call during a meeting. Even those people who consider themselves to be polite because they leave the meeting to take the call are clearly sending a message that they have other more important business than the meeting. Continually coming and going is insulting to the meeting leader, workshop presenter and other attendees.

      9. Pay attention to your cubicle etiquette. Not everyone has an office with a door these days so keep your voice down, turn off the ringer on your phone while you are away and don't eat noisy or smelly foods at your desk.

      10. Take time to be nice. Everyone is stressed and overworked, but we shouldn't be so busy that we can't take time to be kinder to others. I have heard too many people say lately, "I don't have time to be nice." If you don't have time to practice good manners and follow the rules of business etiquette in the workplace, you soon may find yourself without customers, clients and colleagues. In today's economy it pays to be nice more than ever.

      When you commit to these ten resolutions every day, you will see your customer base and your profits grow.

      © 2012, Lydia Ramsey. All rights reserved. Reprints welcomed so long as article and by-line are kept intact and all links made live.

      Lydia Ramsey is an international business etiquette expert, professional speaker, experienced trainer and author of several books on business manners. To learn more about her products and services visit http://www.MannersThatSell.com
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