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Re: [ExtensiveReading] question about using class sets for ER

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  • Glen Hill
    Early finishers can also work on vocabulary lists, or you can provide them with another activity, even a grab-bag collection. You could give the slower readers
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 22, 2013
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      Early finishers can also work on vocabulary lists, or you can provide them with another activity, even a grab-bag collection. You could give the slower readers a head start, too, and do something with the faster kids before they start reading.

      Of course, you should encourage the slower ones to improve their speeds.

      I don't use any class sets at my university. If I were to do that, I'd have homework assigned to read a certain portion before even setting foot in the classroom. That solves the problem of any speed differences (and it encourages everyone to be prepared).

      Glenski

      On Sat, Feb 23, 2013 at 11:35 AM, Richard Day <richardrday@...> wrote:
       

      Al,
      Generally, we don't think of class sets as ER. Think class readers.
      In any event, think about having the earlier finishers re-read.
      Richard



      On Fri, Feb 22, 2013 at 4:29 PM, リチャード・レマー <richard@...> wrote:
       


      Al,

      What age students are you talking about?

      Three quick possibilities come to mind.

      First, have other reading material available at the students' level so when some finish early they can move on to individually selected reading.

      Second, allow those who finish early to go to a place in the room where they can quietly discuss what they just read. They may find they have different opinions, impressions and understanding of the same passage. Sharing is a good way to develop lifelong reading habits.

      Third, although many ER proponents argue against any type of testing, you may devise a few simple questions to check if they have actually comprehended what was read. Fluency involves comprehension as well as speed.

      Goo luck with it.

      Richard

      > ---------------- multipart message ----------------
      > Hello all,
      >
      > I wanted to ask about how you all use class sets for in-class reading.
      > Specifically, I am interested in ways that teachers handle the time
      > difference between faster and slower readers.
      >
      > Put a different way, Reader A finishes a fixed amount of text in a class
      > set in 15 minutes. Reader B will take 25 minutes. What activities might
      > Reader A do to occupy the time productively without distracting Reader B?
      > And how can I work things so that Reader B does not feel left out, or that
      > they are holding everyone back?
      >
      > --
      > Al Evans
      > Tuscaloosa, Alabama
      >




      --
      Richard R. Day, Ph.D.
      Department of Second Language Studies
      University of Hawaii
      Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 U.S.A.
      http://www.hawaii.edu/sls
      Co-Founder, Extensive Reading Foundation
      www.erfoundation.org
      Co-Editor, Reading in a Foreign Language
      nflrc.hawaii.edu/rfl



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