Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [ExtensiveReading] Bar code based system for library management?

Expand Messages
  • Mark Brierley
    Hi Glen, Yes, the bar code already on the book is just the ISBN, so it will be the same if you have multiple copies of the same book. This should still tell
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 5, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Glen,

      Yes, the bar code already on the book is just the ISBN, so it will be the same if you have multiple copies of the same book. This should still tell you that Student X has a copy of book Y. It should still work though, as your main concern is not which one of your five copies of Tom Sawyer the student borrowed, but whether he returned it or not. 

      I remember at the end of the first semester we had handed our books over to the library, a rather furtive librarian complaining about the huge number of unreturned books there were. I asked how many, and I think the answer was 20 or 30. The previous year we had lost two or three thousand books from our class libraries. Literally a hundred times more.

      The big difference is that for librarians, getting books back is a major part of the job. For teachers, it is not. Especially, in my bitter experience, if it is teachers involved in a curriculum-wide ER programme. 

      I strongly believe that some of the teachers were trying to get students to take as many books as they could, and never bring them back.
       
      Trying to look at this positively, so much of the ER teacher's effort goes into getting students to take books away and read them, that we feel almost guilty trying to get the books back. 

      It's such a relief having our books in the library and having the professionals deal with this!

      Mark



      On 6 January 2012 10:38, Glen Hill <glenahill@...> wrote:
       

      Ken and Mark,
      Yes, books already come with bar codes on them, but I think that they do not differ when it comes to multiple copies of the same book. Daniel can correct me on this. If I'm right, you will not be able to track individual copies of a book unless you affix your own bar code labels.

      I have heard people report the loss of 10-15% of library books in general around the world. It is sadly unavoidable, and all we can do is minimize the loss whether through theft, forgetfulness, damage, etc. One thing I would suggest is to hold off on giving a course grade until a student has returned all of the books they have borrowed. Making that clear seems to have helped me a bit with that problem, even though you may have to remind students when it comes to grade time. ("Gee, teacher, why didn't I get a grade?"  "Well, you didn't remember the rule to return all of your books, which I gave you in writing at the beginning of the semester!")

      Whether you or your library controls the books, someone will eventually have to make the effort to contact students about overdue books. It is a fact of life. At my uni library, one person is in charge of phoning the students' parents to get their attention! I have not had to resort to that level with my own graded reader library, but I have gotten success in mailing a self-addressed stamped envelope to some students so they could return it by mail, and it certainly helps to get their advisors involved (although even they are not 100% effective).

      Nobody tells you these sorts of things when you study for your degree, do they?  :)

      Glenski

      On Thu, Jan 5, 2012 at 11:27 AM, Mark Brierley <mark2@...> wrote:
       

      Hi Ken,


      We looked into bar code readers a few years ago as part of a home-made system (made by our IT department). We didn't pursue it at the time, but the system uses book ISBNs, so it should be fairly easy to add a bar code reader to this. 

      Since then we have moved most of our books to the library. (I think we were losing more than 20% of our books each year.)

      Another possibility which we are considering is to get ALL our remaining classroom books registered by the library, then virtually turn the classroom into a library annex, and use a bar code reader from their system.

      This could actually be a lot more flexible, as we would be able to put any combination of books from the library onto a book truck, rather than just being limited to our own selection. 

      I'm not sure yet of the logistics of this, but our experience with the library is that they are very supportive.

      Mark

      On 4 January 2012 11:28, Glen Hill <glenahill@...> wrote:
       

      Ken,
      I presented a short talk on barcode readers/software at an ER conference in Sapporo. I can send you a list of resources you can check out. A lot depends on your budget.

      I am using a good system called ResourceMate by Jaywil company in Guelph, Canada. A bit costly (US$1,000 or so), but good customer support via email, and for the past 2 years or so I have had very little trouble using it. Extremely easy to set up and to train yourself (or Japanese student workers like mine). Feel free to contact me off line for any more info.

      Daniel Stewart wrote an article on how he set up his own barcode system using FilePro, I believe. Too hard to set up for my taste, but he's another resource if you want to shop around.

      Glenski



      On Wed, Jan 4, 2012 at 10:04 AM, hudson murrell <hudson_murrell@...> wrote:
       

      Ken
      Maybe Primasoft was the name of the company, if that helps.
      Hudson

      From: kenschmidtjp <kennethjschmidt@...>
      To: ExtensiveReading@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, December 30, 2011 9:59 PM
      Subject: [ExtensiveReading] Bar code based system for library management?

       
      Greetings,

      My university library has been very helpful with providing an ER corner
      and an annual budget for books, but I also have a large personal library
      that I bring to all my classes on a book cart. This has been a great
      resource, but I do lose about 10-20% of my books every year. I use a
      sign-out/sign-in system, but it's too cumbersome to actually track down
      who has and hasn't returned books.

      Until now I've accepted this as the "cost of doing business," but with
      the availability of inexpensive bar code readers, I'm wondering if there
      is a bar-code based small/personal library management system available
      that would allow my students to easily check books out and in and would
      allow easy inventory management to boot. I've been checking some
      websites, but wonder if anyone on this list has already implemented a
      system and could offer guidance.

      Thanks very much and best wishes for a great New Year,

      Ken Schmidt







      --

      Mark Brierley
      School of General Education
      Shinshu University
      Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan
      +81 263 37-2923
      mobile 090 4464 6391

      --

      My blog about building a plus-energy house in Japan:
      http://minuszeroeco.blogspot.com/





      --

      Mark Brierley
      School of General Education
      Shinshu University
      Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan
      +81 263 37-2923
      mobile 090 4464 6391

      --

      My blog about building a plus-energy house in Japan:
      http://minuszeroeco.blogspot.com/

    • Glenski
      ... Mark, If Takashi, Mari, and Akiko have each borrowed a copy of Tom Sawyer (you have at least 3 copies in your library), but you are trying to determine
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 9, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In ExtensiveReading@yahoogroups.com, Mark Brierley <mark2@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Glen,
        >
        > Yes, the bar code already on the book is just the ISBN, so it will be the
        > same if you have multiple copies of the same book. This should still tell
        > you that Student X has a copy of book Y. It should still work though, as
        > your main concern is not which one of your five copies of Tom Sawyer the
        > student borrowed, but whether he returned it or not.


        Mark,
        If Takashi, Mari, and Akiko have each borrowed a copy of Tom Sawyer (you have at least 3 copies in your library), but you are trying to determine which student has not returned the one that is still outstanding, a bar code reader will not tell you the person if you are using the bar code that is originally on the book. It will only tell you that one copy is out.

        If any of those students lies or has given their copy to a friend that forgot to return it, or something else happened, you will still not know.


        >
        > The big difference is that for librarians, getting books back is a major
        > part of the job. For teachers, it is not. Especially, in my bitter
        > experience, if it is teachers involved in a curriculum-wide ER programme.


        Absolutely! It's becoming a headache of mine, but thankfully the vice-president of my uni is our resource center director, and we have gotten his support on contacting students to get books back.

        What has become a chore is that we have poor records from a handwritten notebook checkout system from 2 years ago. Anything there I have considered long-gone and irretrievable. I was therefore shocked when a couple of weeks ago a student sheepishly returned a book from two and a half years ago! Obviously, someone had gotten to him.

        Another thorn in my side is how to contact the students.
        1) They change their email addresses.
        2) They use such high security on some cell phone email systems that they block everyone except their best friends.
        3) They change their phone numbers.

        And, they never tell anyone about this, not even the university! I've gone around with Student Services on this, and neither they nor the main library has a complete list of current phone numbers or email addresses, hence the need to call a student's parents sometimes.


        >
        > I strongly believe that some of the teachers were trying to get students to
        > take as many books as they could, and never bring them back.


        This is where making a rule that "no returned books = no grade" will help.


        >
        > Trying to look at this positively, so much of the ER teacher's effort goes
        > into getting students to take books away and read them, that we feel almost
        > guilty trying to get the books back.


        Dispel those notions! Make the ***students*** the guilt-ridden ones! So many are incredibly immature and need a kick in the pants anyway.


        >
        > It's such a relief having our books in the library and having the
        > professionals deal with this!


        Yes, Tom Robb has advocated this, and to a point I agree. However, how do you deal with knowing/not knowing which books are long gone and need to be replaced?

        Glenski
      • stewart_reading@mac.com
        Hi Ken, As Glenski mentioned, I wrote an article on this a few years back. It is in ERJ 2.1 and can be downloaded from http://jaltersig.org/ Technologies have
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 10, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Ken,
              As Glenski mentioned, I wrote an article on this a few years back.  It is in ERJ 2.1 and can be downloaded from

          Technologies have changed since I wrote that article, but the issues you need to deal with are still the same so I think you will find some useful information there.

          Daniel

          On Dec 30, 2011, at 9:59 PM, kenschmidtjp wrote:

          Greetings,

          My university library has been very helpful with providing an ER corner
          and an annual budget for books, but I also have a large personal library
          that I bring to all my classes on a book cart. This has been a great
          resource, but I do lose about 10-20% of my books every year. I use a
          sign-out/sign-in system, but it's too cumbersome to actually track down
          who has and hasn't returned books.

          Until now I've accepted this as the "cost of doing business," but with
          the availability of inexpensive bar code readers, I'm wondering if there
          is a bar-code based small/personal library management system available
          that would allow my students to easily check books out and in and would
          allow easy inventory management to boot. I've been checking some
          websites, but wonder if anyone on this list has already implemented a
          system and could offer guidance.

          Thanks very much and best wishes for a great New Year,

          Ken Schmidt




          ------------------------------------

          Yahoo! Groups Links

          <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:

          <*> Your email settings:
              Individual Email | Traditional

          <*> To change settings online go to:
              (Yahoo! ID required)

          <*> To change settings via email:

          <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:

          <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:


        • stewart_reading@mac.com
          I don t use the ISBN on the back of the book as we have 20 copies of some books. I printed up barcodes that include a copy number. It is not hard. Barcodes
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 10, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            I don't use the ISBN on the back of the book as we have 20 copies of some books. I printed up barcodes that include a copy number.  It is not hard.  Barcodes are just another font. We also encourage students to share books with their friends so we can have a reading community. If they like a book they should lend it to a friend.  As each book has a distinct barcode, we know if it really got back or not.  Ultimately the student who signed it out is responsible for it. It is very rare that a student says a missing book was lent to a friend.  Actually students seem to be more careful with books signed out in a friend's name than ones in their own name.

            Daniel

            On Jan 6, 2012, at 10:38 AM, Glen Hill wrote:



            Ken and Mark,
            Yes, books already come with bar codes on them, but I think that they do not differ when it comes to multiple copies of the same book. Daniel can correct me on this. If I'm right, you will not be able to track individual copies of a book unless you affix your own bar code labels.

            I have heard people report the loss of 10-15% of library books in general around the world. It is sadly unavoidable, and all we can do is minimize the loss whether through theft, forgetfulness, damage, etc. One thing I would suggest is to hold off on giving a course grade until a student has returned all of the books they have borrowed. Making that clear seems to have helped me a bit with that problem, even though you may have to remind students when it comes to grade time. ("Gee, teacher, why didn't I get a grade?"  "Well, you didn't remember the rule to return all of your books, which I gave you in writing at the beginning of the semester!")

            Whether you or your library controls the books, someone will eventually have to make the effort to contact students about overdue books. It is a fact of life. At my uni library, one person is in charge of phoning the students' parents to get their attention! I have not had to resort to that level with my own graded reader library, but I have gotten success in mailing a self-addressed stamped envelope to some students so they could return it by mail, and it certainly helps to get their advisors involved (although even they are not 100% effective).

            Nobody tells you these sorts of things when you study for your degree, do they?  :)

            Glenski

            On Thu, Jan 5, 2012 at 11:27 AM, Mark Brierley <mark2@...> wrote:
             

            Hi Ken,


            We looked into bar code readers a few years ago as part of a home-made system (made by our IT department). We didn't pursue it at the time, but the system uses book ISBNs, so it should be fairly easy to add a bar code reader to this. 

            Since then we have moved most of our books to the library. (I think we were losing more than 20% of our books each year.)

            Another possibility which we are considering is to get ALL our remaining classroom books registered by the library, then virtually turn the classroom into a library annex, and use a bar code reader from their system.

            This could actually be a lot more flexible, as we would be able to put any combination of books from the library onto a book truck, rather than just being limited to our own selection. 

            I'm not sure yet of the logistics of this, but our experience with the library is that they are very supportive.

            Mark

            On 4 January 2012 11:28, Glen Hill <glenahill@...> wrote:
             

            Ken,
            I presented a short talk on barcode readers/software at an ER conference in Sapporo. I can send you a list of resources you can check out. A lot depends on your budget.

            I am using a good system called ResourceMate by Jaywil company in Guelph, Canada. A bit costly (US$1,000 or so), but good customer support via email, and for the past 2 years or so I have had very little trouble using it. Extremely easy to set up and to train yourself (or Japanese student workers like mine). Feel free to contact me off line for any more info.

            Daniel Stewart wrote an article on how he set up his own barcode system using FilePro, I believe. Too hard to set up for my taste, but he's another resource if you want to shop around.

            Glenski



            On Wed, Jan 4, 2012 at 10:04 AM, hudson murrell <hudson_murrell@...> wrote:
             

            Ken
            Maybe Primasoft was the name of the company, if that helps. 
            Hudson

            From: kenschmidtjp <kennethjschmidt@...>
            To: ExtensiveReading@yahoogroups.com 
            Sent: Friday, December 30, 2011 9:59 PM
            Subject: [ExtensiveReading] Bar code based system for library management?

             
            Greetings,

            My university library has been very helpful with providing an ER corner
            and an annual budget for books, but I also have a large personal library
            that I bring to all my classes on a book cart. This has been a great
            resource, but I do lose about 10-20% of my books every year. I use a
            sign-out/sign-in system, but it's too cumbersome to actually track down
            who has and hasn't returned books.

            Until now I've accepted this as the "cost of doing business," but with
            the availability of inexpensive bar code readers, I'm wondering if there
            is a bar-code based small/personal library management system available
            that would allow my students to easily check books out and in and would
            allow easy inventory management to boot. I've been checking some
            websites, but wonder if anyone on this list has already implemented a
            system and could offer guidance.

            Thanks very much and best wishes for a great New Year,

            Ken Schmidt









            -- 

            Mark Brierley
            School of General Education
            Shinshu University
            Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan
            +81 263 37-2923
            mobile 090 4464 6391

            --

            My blog about building a plus-energy house in Japan:
            http://minuszeroeco.blogspot.com/






          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.