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RE: [ExtensiveReading] "In Study, Children Cite Appeal of Digital Reading"

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  • dk
    Perhaps the operative point of that is today one-third of the children are ready to give up paper books altogether. In five years, this ratio is going to
    Message 1 of 14 , Oct 1, 2010
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      Perhaps the operative point of that is today one-third of the children are ready to give up paper books altogether. In five years, this ratio is going to change. What direction do you think it will go in?

       

      I hate reading a book on my computer.

       

      I love reading on my Windows Mobile smart phone while on the bus, before dozing off to sleep or perhaps listening to an audiobook while commuting through the city or waiting in line for something.

       

      My E-Books and audiobooks are always with me because my phone is always with me. I don’t need an extra hand or pocket to carry them. In fact, with audiobooks I am hands free and can continue an audiobook while shaving or even showering.

       

      My book reading has shot up tremendously since I discovered the joy of audio and E-Books and how easily they can fill in the many little gaps of time I have throughout the day.

       

      Most recent audiobooks I’ve enjoyed: The Fabric of the Cosmos by Brian Greene, The Joy and Sorrow of Work by Alain de Botton, Ghost Wars by Alex Berenson.

       

      Next will be: Super Freakonomics by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner, The Elephanta Suite by Paul Theroux and The Professor and the Madman by Simon Winchester.

       

      We can probably say audio and E-Books are here to stay but I don’t think we can say the same for paperbooks.

       

      Dave

       

    • Glen Hill
      Yes, of course, the trend will be towards more e-books and audio books. However, I think it is safe to say that it will be a while before paper books are ever
      Message 2 of 14 , Oct 1, 2010
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        Yes, of course, the trend will be towards more e-books and audio books.  However, I think it is safe to say that it will be a while before paper books are ever completely eliminated. e-readers will have to be improved a lot and prices lowered considerably before everyone is willing to go with only audio and e-books as sources of reading  material, despite the conveniences and enjoyment you have noted, Dave. Think not only of technophobic groups like the Amish, but also of people where there is little to no technology available (e.g., certain parts of Africa).

        I will be frank and display my ignorance here by asking a question.  How much does it cost for an audio or e-book?

        Glenski

        On Fri, Oct 1, 2010 at 8:18 PM, dk <davekees1@...> wrote:
         

        Perhaps the operative point of that is today one-third of the children are ready to give up paper books altogether. In five years, this ratio is going to change. What direction do you think it will go in?

         

        I hate reading a book on my computer.

         

        I love reading on my Windows Mobile smart phone while on the bus, before dozing off to sleep or perhaps listening to an audiobook while commuting through the city or waiting in line for something.

         

        My E-Books and audiobooks are always with me because my phone is always with me. I don’t need an extra hand or pocket to carry them. In fact, with audiobooks I am hands free and can continue an audiobook while shaving or even showering.

         

        My book reading has shot up tremendously since I discovered the joy of audio and E-Books and how easily they can fill in the many little gaps of time I have throughout the day.

         

        Most recent audiobooks I’ve enjoyed: The Fabric of the Cosmos by Brian Greene, The Joy and Sorrow of Work by Alain de Botton, Ghost Wars by Alex Berenson.

         

        Next will be: Super Freakonomics by Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner, The Elephanta Suite by Paul Theroux and The Professor and the Madman by Simon Winchester.

         

        We can probably say audio and E-Books are here to stay but I don’t think we can say the same for paperbooks.

         

        Dave

         


      • medina bushuru
        Hi all, It matters a lot how the children are brought up, if they are conventionally exposed to print books, so shall they follow that trend, as is the case
        Message 3 of 14 , Oct 1, 2010
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          Hi all,

          It matters a lot how the children are brought up, if they are conventionally exposed to print books, so shall they follow that trend, as is the case when they are exposed to both.Either cases serve better. The traditional print books will take a very long time to face out, something that is not perceived to happen. E-book is a great idea, consider it is less bulky. However, availability and cost are the current challenges our generation are facing.

          Medina.

        • Ben Shearon
          I don t agree ;) The speed of change in terms of price of hardware and penetration of ebooks is accelerating. The Kindle cost about 600 dollars when it came
          Message 4 of 14 , Oct 1, 2010
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            I don't agree ;)

            The speed of change in terms of price of hardware and penetration of ebooks is accelerating. The Kindle cost about 600 dollars when it came out a few years ago: the most recent one is $130 so I bought one as it was in my price range. Most cellphones in developed countries will be smartphones soon. Ipads and other tablets will be widespread within the next few years.

            However, I only got the Kindle because I had the Kindle app on my iphone and enjoyed using it. I have a blog post on my experience with ebooks here:

            I hated the idea of ebooks even two years ago. Now I refuse to buy paper books if there is an ebook alternative.

            cheers

            ben

            On 2 October 2010 08:18, medina bushuru <medinabushuru@...> wrote:
             

            Hi all,

            It matters a lot how the children are brought up, if they are conventionally exposed to print books, so shall they follow that trend, as is the case when they are exposed to both.Either cases serve better. The traditional print books will take a very long time to face out, something that is not perceived to happen. E-book is a great idea, consider it is less bulky. However, availability and cost are the current challenges our generation are facing.

            Medina
          • dk
            .e-readers will have to be improved a lot and prices lowered considerably before everyone is willing to go with only audio and e-books as sources of reading
            Message 5 of 14 , Oct 1, 2010
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              “…e-readers will have to be improved a lot and prices lowered considerably before everyone is willing to go with only audio and e-books as sources of reading  material, despite the conveniences and enjoyment you have noted. Think not only of technophobic groups like the Amish, but also of people where there is little to no technology available (e.g., certain parts of Africa).”

               

               

              I think that is an odd argument to make.

               

              I don’t think I suggested that every single human being in the world is going to adopt E-Books. I certainly don’t think E-Books have to be commonplace with every tribe in Africa or with the Amish for us to say that this is a significant trend that is going to overtake us as teachers and our students.

               

              But let’s take a minute and look at the question of Africa or remote areas of India. Attempts are being made to introduce useful and hardy technology to remote areas like Africa. Note the $100 laptop project and the Hole In the Wall project(1).

               

              Whether those two particular projects succeed or not, they indicate a trend. And due to such a trend, it is likely that the future cheap ubiquitous technology that is coming will leapfrog over paperbound traditions.

               

              I mean, who is going to haul and maintain heavy paper books all over Africa and India? But with cheap robust computers and some energy source, such as fuel cells, and communication links, people can have a modern global library at their fingertips. Sure, there are a lot of hurdles to overcome but they will likely be overcome before a library is set up within a day’s walk of every tribe.

               

              As for the Amish, this is certainly a lifestyle choice, not a question of access.

               

              Dave

               

              (1) http://www.ted.com/talks/sugata_mitra_shows_how_kids_teach_themselves.html

               

               

               

            • dk
              Here is an example of prices for the John Grisham novel, The Appeal. Most people probably get their books at Amazon: Hardcover, $18.45 Paperback, $10.08, $7.99
              Message 6 of 14 , Oct 1, 2010
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                Here is an example of prices for the John Grisham novel, The Appeal.

                 

                Most people probably get their books at Amazon:

                Hardcover, $18.45

                Paperback, $10.08, $7.99

                Audiobook, $10.19

                E-Book, $7.59

                 

                Of course, some people don’t pay for audiobooks or E-Books. They find such downloads, legal or illegal, at places like:

                http://ebook30.com/

                http://audiobookvault.ws/

                http://literalsystems.org/abooks/index.php

                http://librivox.org/

                http://audiobooksforfree.com/

                 

                 

                Dave

                 

              • Glen Hill
                I guess we just need to set our definitions here. Dave, you use the word ubiquitous for the technology, and you talk about people lugging books around the
                Message 7 of 14 , Oct 2, 2010
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                  I guess we just need to set our definitions here.  Dave, you use the word "ubiquitous" for the technology, and you talk about people  lugging books around the country/world. To me, that says you are talking about people from developed countries who can afford the technology (no matter the downward trend in pricing, Ben).  I just pointed out that despite "ubiquitous technology", there are going to be people who belong to underdeveloped / developing countries who can't afford such luxuries and will have to contend with books for a long, long time.

                  Question for Ben (perhaps another naive one, but I'm not shy):
                  Where do you keep your e-books for future reading once you've finished with them?

                  Glenski
                  On Sat, Oct 2, 2010 at 2:54 PM, dk <davekees1@...> wrote:
                   

                  “…e-readers will have to be improved a lot and prices lowered considerably before everyone is willing to go with only audio and e-books as sources of reading  material, despite the conveniences and enjoyment you have noted. Think not only of technophobic groups like the Amish, but also of people where there is little to no technology available (e.g., certain parts of Africa).”

                   

                   

                  I think that is an odd argument to make.

                   

                  I don’t think I suggested that every single human being in the world is going to adopt E-Books. I certainly don’t think E-Books have to be commonplace with every tribe in Africa or with the Amish for us to say that this is a significant trend that is going to overtake us as teachers and our students.

                   

                  But let’s take a minute and look at the question of Africa or remote areas of India. Attempts are being made to introduce useful and hardy technology to remote areas like Africa. Note the $100 laptop project and the Hole In the Wall project(1).

                   

                  Whether those two particular projects succeed or not, they indicate a trend. And due to such a trend, it is likely that the future cheap ubiquitous technology that is coming will leapfrog over paperbound traditions.

                   

                  I mean, who is going to haul and maintain heavy paper books all over Africa and India? But with cheap robust computers and some energy source, such as fuel cells, and communication links, people can have a modern global library at their fingertips. Sure, there are a lot of hurdles to overcome but they will likely be overcome before a library is set up within a day’s walk of every tribe.

                   

                  As for the Amish, this is certainly a lifestyle choice, not a question of access.

                   

                  Dave

                   

                  (1) http://www.ted.com/talks/sugata_mitra_shows_how_kids_teach_themselves.html

                   

                   

                   


                • Ben Shearon
                  I think I agree with Dave on this one. Much like most of the developing world has skipped landline phones and gone straight to cellphones because the networks
                  Message 8 of 14 , Oct 2, 2010
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                    I think I agree with Dave on this one. Much like most of the developing world has skipped landline phones and gone straight to cellphones because the networks are much cheaper to install and run, I think it will very soon (if it isn't already) be much cheaper to have cheap ereaders and an almost unlimited number of books than to transport paper to more remote areas.

                    Ereaders  can store thousands of books, and they all sync with computers or the cloud so you have pretty much unlimited storage.

                    All the best

                    ben shearon
                    sendai

                    2010/10/2 Glen Hill <glenahill@...>
                     

                    I guess we just need to set our definitions here.  Dave, you use the word "ubiquitous" for the technology, and you talk about people  lugging books around the country/world. To me, that says you are talking about people from developed countries who can afford the technology (no matter the downward trend in pricing, Ben).  I just pointed out that despite "ubiquitous technology", there are going to be people who belong to underdeveloped / developing countries who can't afford such luxuries and will have to contend with books for a long, long time.

                    Question for Ben (perhaps another naive one, but I'm not shy):
                    Where do you keep your e-books for future reading once you've finished with them?

                    Glenski

                    On Sat, Oct 2, 2010 at 2:54 PM, dk <davekees1@...> wrote:
                     

                    “…e-readers will have to be improved a lot and prices lowered considerably before everyone is willing to go with only audio and e-books as sources of reading  material, despite the conveniences and enjoyment you have noted. Think not only of technophobic groups like the Amish, but also of people where there is little to no technology available (e.g., certain parts of Africa).”

                     

                     

                    I think that is an odd argument to make.

                     

                    I don’t think I suggested that every single human being in the world is going to adopt E-Books. I certainly don’t think E-Books have to be commonplace with every tribe in Africa or with the Amish for us to say that this is a significant trend that is going to overtake us as teachers and our students.

                     

                    But let’s take a minute and look at the question of Africa or remote areas of India. Attempts are being made to introduce useful and hardy technology to remote areas like Africa. Note the $100 laptop project and the Hole In the Wall project(1).

                     

                    Whether those two particular projects succeed or not, they indicate a trend. And due to such a trend, it is likely that the future cheap ubiquitous technology that is coming will leapfrog over paperbound traditions.

                     

                    I mean, who is going to haul and maintain heavy paper books all over Africa and India? But with cheap robust computers and some energy source, such as fuel cells, and communication links, people can have a modern global library at their fingertips. Sure, there are a lot of hurdles to overcome but they will likely be overcome before a library is set up within a day’s walk of every tribe.

                     

                    As for the Amish, this is certainly a lifestyle choice, not a question of access.

                     

                    Dave

                     

                    (1) http://www.ted.com/talks/sugata_mitra_shows_how_kids_teach_themselves.html

                     

                     

                     



                  • Mark Brierley
                    Hi Everyone, I don t have a source for these statistics, but I believe that in a decade the mobile phone has brought more telecommunication to Africa than a
                    Message 9 of 14 , Oct 2, 2010
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                      Hi Everyone,

                      I don't have a source for these statistics, but I believe that in a decade the mobile phone has brought more telecommunication to Africa than a century of land lines. Africa is now the biggest growing market for mobile phones.

                      Perhaps the technology can also do the same for literacy.

                      Mark (been followi
                      ng most of this thr
                      ead on my phone...)

                      On 2 October 2010 18:06, Ben Shearon <sendaiben@...> wrote:
                       

                      I think I agree with Dave on this one. Much like most of the developing world has skipped landline phones and gone straight to cellphones because the networks are much cheaper to install and run, I think it will very soon (if it isn't already) be much cheaper to have cheap ereaders and an almost unlimited number of books than to transport paper to more remote areas.


                      Ereaders  can store thousands of books, and they all sync with computers or the cloud so you have pretty much unlimited storage.

                      All the best

                      ben shearon
                      sendai

                      2010/10/2 Glen Hill <glenahill@...>

                       

                      I guess we just need to set our definitions here.  Dave, you use the word "ubiquitous" for the technology, and you talk about people  lugging books around the country/world. To me, that says you are talking about people from developed countries who can afford the technology (no matter the downward trend in pricing, Ben).  I just pointed out that despite "ubiquitous technology", there are going to be people who belong to underdeveloped / developing countries who can't afford such luxuries and will have to contend with books for a long, long time.

                      Question for Ben (perhaps another naive one, but I'm not shy):
                      Where do you keep your e-books for future reading once you've finished with them?

                      Glenski

                      On Sat, Oct 2, 2010 at 2:54 PM, dk <davekees1@...> wrote:
                       

                      “…e-readers will have to be improved a lot and prices lowered considerably before everyone is willing to go with only audio and e-books as sources of reading  material, despite the conveniences and enjoyment you have noted. Think not only of technophobic groups like the Amish, but also of people where there is little to no technology available (e.g., certain parts of Africa).”

                       

                       

                      I think that is an odd argument to make.

                       

                      I don’t think I suggested that every single human being in the world is going to adopt E-Books. I certainly don’t think E-Books have to be commonplace with every tribe in Africa or with the Amish for us to say that this is a significant trend that is going to overtake us as teachers and our students.

                       

                      But let’s take a minute and look at the question of Africa or remote areas of India. Attempts are being made to introduce useful and hardy technology to remote areas like Africa. Note the $100 laptop project and the Hole In the Wall project(1).

                       

                      Whether those two particular projects succeed or not, they indicate a trend. And due to such a trend, it is likely that the future cheap ubiquitous technology that is coming will leapfrog over paperbound traditions.

                       

                      I mean, who is going to haul and maintain heavy paper books all over Africa and India? But with cheap robust computers and some energy source, such as fuel cells, and communication links, people can have a modern global library at their fingertips. Sure, there are a lot of hurdles to overcome but they will likely be overcome before a library is set up within a day’s walk of every tribe.

                       

                      As for the Amish, this is certainly a lifestyle choice, not a question of access.

                       

                      Dave

                       

                      (1) http://www.ted.com/talks/sugata_mitra_shows_how_kids_teach_themselves.html

                       

                       

                       






                      --
                      Mark Brierley
                      School of General Education
                      Shinshu University
                      Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan
                      +81 263 37-2923
                      mobile 090 4464 6391
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