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Re: [ExtensiveReading] OUP's Dominoes series

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  • Clive Lovelock
    I saw one about the Wild West. Interesting, both for the content and the illustrations (lots of contemporary photos, posters and other art work. However, the
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 30, 1903
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      I saw one about the Wild West. Interesting, both for the content and the
      illustrations (lots of contemporary photos, posters and other art work.
      However, the exercises tend to swamped the text somewhat. I think
      teachers would have to give guidance on which exercises - if any -
      students should do, and tell students not to spend to much time on them.
      Alternatively, the students could be advised to read the chapter first,
      ignoring all the exercises, and then look at the exercises to see how
      much they remembered. That might spur them to re-read bits out of
      curiosity, if they enjoy quizzes.

      The book I saw (I've since passed it on to a colleague to check out, and
      don't have it in front of me) struck me as being more aimed at drawing
      conscious attention to vocabulary, than at promoting the habit of
      extensive reading.

      What's the series title? Domino Series?

      Clive

      brettetj wrote:
      >
      > Our OUP rep came around yesterday flogging their new series of
      > graded readers. They've used their Bookworms grading
      > framework but included glosses on the page (monolingual in the
      > margins [that's what we're planning for our Japanese graded
      > readers]). They've also got lots of colour (actually, the samples I
      > saw looked rather hectic) and heaps of activities bookending
      > each chapter with extra at the end.
      >
      > We'll probably get a copy of each new title at school. There are
      > only a few available at the moment, but some of them are just
      > existing bookworms texts in a different format.
      >
      > Anybody else seen them? Know about them, care to comment?
      >
      > --
      > Brett Reynolds
      > Sakuragaoka Girls' Jr. & Sr. High School, Tokyo
      > brett@...
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > ExtensiveReading-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
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    • Ronan Brown
      Thanks to you all for the guidance on using graded readers to learn Japanese. I am better infromed now of the possibilities. Julian thanks for the pointers on
      Message 2 of 10 , Jun 28, 2002
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        Thanks to you all for the guidance on using graded readers to learn Japanese. I am better infromed now of the possibilities. Julian thanks for the pointers on those involved in Japan and Hawaii, and the materials that have been used. Will let know what I find out in future follow-ups. Akio thanks for that email contact which may yet bear fruit. Yoko thanks, too.
         
        All these best,
         
        Ronan Brown
      • brettetj
        Sorry about that. Somehow my wife s settings got mixed into mine. The post that appeared to be from Yoko Reynolds was actually from Brett Reynolds. ... brett
        Message 3 of 10 , Jun 29, 2002
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          Sorry about that. Somehow my wife's settings got mixed into
          mine. The post that appeared to be from Yoko Reynolds was
          actually from Brett Reynolds.

          --- In ExtensiveReading@y..., "Ronan Brown" <ronan@s...>
          wrote:
          > Yoko thanks, too.

          brett reynolds
          patch@...
        • brettetj
          Our OUP rep came around yesterday flogging their new series of graded readers. They ve used their Bookworms grading framework but included glosses on the page
          Message 4 of 10 , Jun 29, 2002
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            Our OUP rep came around yesterday flogging their new series of
            graded readers. They've used their Bookworms grading
            framework but included glosses on the page (monolingual in the
            margins [that's what we're planning for our Japanese graded
            readers]). They've also got lots of colour (actually, the samples I
            saw looked rather hectic) and heaps of activities bookending
            each chapter with extra at the end.

            We'll probably get a copy of each new title at school. There are
            only a few available at the moment, but some of them are just
            existing bookworms texts in a different format.

            Anybody else seen them? Know about them, care to comment?

            --
            Brett Reynolds
            Sakuragaoka Girls' Jr. & Sr. High School, Tokyo
            brett@...
          • Julian Bamford
            Brett Reynolds wrote: Our OUP rep came around yesterday flogging their new series of ... existing Bookworms texts in a different format. Anybody else seen
            Message 5 of 10 , Jun 29, 2002
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              Brett Reynolds wrote: Our OUP rep came around yesterday flogging their new
              series of
              >graded readers... [with] glosses on the page (monolingual in the
              >margins...). They've also got... heaps of activities bookending each
              >chapter with extra at the end... some of them are just
              existing Bookworms texts in a different format. Anybody else seen them?
              Know about them, care to comment?

              I haven't seen them, but may I comment anyway?

              Monolingual glosses on the page. That sound great. Of all the ways of
              glossing (and not glossing), that seems the most user friendly in my
              experience. (Of course, if there are more than a couple of words glossed
              per page, it gets a bit "rich" and starts taking away from the enjoyment of
              reading.)

              Heaps of activities. It's like a pendulum. First come the books and then
              come the (free photocopiable) worksheets of increasing sophistication, and
              now it sounds like OUP has put the worksheets and the book together. And
              with good reason because I'm sure that's what teachers want and ask for.
              It's almost as if, from a teacher's point of view, extensive reading is a
              vacuum, and education, as well as nature, abhors them. We rush in and fill
              it with activities and exercises to make sure the teacher is working and
              extensive reading is "working." Then someone says, "But this takes away
              from reading," and a publisher strips the comprehension questions and
              exercises out of the books so they are just books. And then, gradually,
              the activities reappear. . .

              Right when Brett's mail arrived, I was transcribing a student's "Think
              aloud" as she read a story aloud and voiced her thoughts between sentences
              as she read. (For example: "I think this is a school story as he's
              Professor Challenger" "He's about my age." "I envy him that he likes his
              job."). I hadn't met this student before, and I asked her her current
              TOEFL score, and we began with a book of equivalent level. After a few
              minutes, her thinkaloud comments made it clear she wasn't understanding
              more than the broadest strokes of the story. So I had her stop and tell me
              how many words she didn't know on the page. There were only three. The
              vocabulary level was fine, but the complexity of the sentences and the
              unstated suppositions behind the story were beyond her. So we came right
              down to a Heinemann Elementary Guided Reader (EPER Level D). This wasn't a
              surprise, as she wasn't used to reading in English. With the easier book,
              she began reading and making comments similar to those of a fluent reader.
              In terms of reading, what this student needs is practice so she can "grow
              into" the English she already knows.

              Good activities between chapters are for language practice, work on reading
              strategies or vocabulary, and comprehension monitoring. All those things
              are important in most language programs and to most students. But students
              also need 'just reading.' The two aren't mutually exclusive. Teachers
              just need to be aware of what they are doing, and why they are doing it,
              when they use a Bookworm, and when they use the Dominoes version of that
              Bookworm.

              Julian
            • Nikorasu Kweto
              I ve nothing to comment about the new OUP books, I m afraid, other than to say I ll be contacting OUP for some samples :-) Actually, familiar a bit with Brett
              Message 6 of 10 , Jun 29, 2002
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                I've nothing to comment about the new OUP books, I'm afraid, other than to say I'll be contacting OUP for some samples :-) 
                 
                Actually, familiar a bit with Brett Reynold's teaching situation, what I am curious about is whether he's using (or planning to use?) monolingual glosses, especially with jr high students, and, if so, how the students react. Brett? or anyone else using graded readers with _Japanese jr/sr high_ learners?
                 
                (FWIW, I can't imagine monolingual glosses, no matter how simplified, going over very well (if at all!) with _most_ secondary level students here. So, instead, given that the graded readers I use always include a large picture on each page, for "unknown" words I encourage students to first try infering the meaning from that picture -- which they can confirm either with a friend, with me in Japanese, or, if they absolutely must, with a bilingual dictionary (the shy but stubborn ones, who always insist on plodding along letter by letter) -- or, failing that, to guess the meaning through a process of elimination by comparing the list of very simple Japanese glosses I provide for key-words (ie, high-frequency) in each story to decide which one is the most apt. )
                 
                Cheers.
                 
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              • rube39_@eml.cc
                Julian, I certainly do like your style! In a very nice way you say Yes, they just need to read (get meaningful input) . Most of the time, it really is that
                Message 7 of 10 , Jun 29, 2002
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                  Julian,

                  I certainly do like your style!
                  In a very nice way you say 'Yes, they just need to read (get meaningful
                  input)'.
                  Most of the time, it really is that simple. If people would just let us
                  be.
                  Oh well,

                  Rube
                • Rob Waring
                  Hi all I see quite a shift in focus for these readers. These are consumables not readers in the traditional sense. They appear to be set up to be used only
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jun 30, 2002
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                    Re: [ExtensiveReading] OUP's Dominoes series
                    Hi all

                    I see quite a shift in focus for these readers. These are consumables not readers in the traditional sense.  They appear to be set up to be used only once (after someone has filled in the exercises no one else can use it in the same way) and would be 'class readers' not really for individual use. For those in Japan, I will be making a presentation about them at JALT. From what I have heard it seems these books were published with a specific audience in mind - teenager classes.
                    -- 
                    
                    Best regards,

                    Rob Waring
                    Notre Dame Seishin University,
                    2-16-9 Ifuku-cho,
                    Okayama,
                    Japan. 700-8516
                    +81 86 252 1155 (extn. 325)
                    +81 86 252 5734 (fax)
                  • David Hill
                    Yes, I have seen the new OUP Dominoes. They seem in some ways an answer to my plea in the ELTJ last year for more assistance for the learner to understand
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jul 1 5:47 AM
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                      Yes, I have seen the new OUP Dominoes.

                      They seem in some ways an answer to my plea in the ELTJ last year for more
                      assistance for the learner to understand the story and learn new language
                      as he reads. I am certainly in favour of highlighting words that are
                      explained in a footnote or glossary and I think footnotes are bettter than
                      glossaries.

                      In fact I believe they are more a reluctant response to pleas from teachers
                      for work that pupils can do to provide tangible evidence that they are doing
                      something.

                      I do not know how much they have trialled this format, nor do I know where
                      the answers to the questions are available.

                      I would be interested to hear what others think or whether students liked
                      them.

                      Best wishes all round

                      David

                      I am surprised they chose the Turn of the Screw, which I always find
                      difficult to understand at the best of times.
                      David R Hill
                      EPER (Edinburgh Project on Extensive Reading)
                      IALS (Institute for Applied Language Studies)
                      University of Edinburgh, 21 Hill Place, Edinburgh EH8 9DP
                      Tel: 0131 650 8211/6200 Fax: 0131 667 5927
                      Website: www.ials.ed.ac.uk/epermenu.html
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "brettetj" <patch@...>
                      To: <ExtensiveReading@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Saturday, June 29, 2002 11:56 AM
                      Subject: [ExtensiveReading] OUP's Dominoes series


                      > Our OUP rep came around yesterday flogging their new series of
                      > graded readers. They've used their Bookworms grading
                      > framework but included glosses on the page (monolingual in the
                      > margins [that's what we're planning for our Japanese graded
                      > readers]). They've also got lots of colour (actually, the samples I
                      > saw looked rather hectic) and heaps of activities bookending
                      > each chapter with extra at the end.
                      >
                      > We'll probably get a copy of each new title at school. There are
                      > only a few available at the moment, but some of them are just
                      > existing bookworms texts in a different format.
                      >
                      > Anybody else seen them? Know about them, care to comment?
                      >
                      > --
                      > Brett Reynolds
                      > Sakuragaoka Girls' Jr. & Sr. High School, Tokyo
                      > brett@...
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                      > ExtensiveReading-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                      >
                    • Julian Bamford
                      Hi ER list, Below is an announcement of a new award for language learner literature (graded readers) in English. If you are involved with or know of any ELT
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jun 2, 2004
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                        Hi ER list,
                        Below is an announcement of a new award for language learner literature
                        (graded readers) in English. If you are involved with or know of any ELT
                        media (local newsletters; websites, etc.), feel free to forward the
                        announcement to them. Or you can send their email address to me and I'll
                        mail them the announcement with the handsome Extensive Reading Foundation
                        logo as an attachment.
                        Best wishes,
                        Julian
                        ----------
                        The Extensive Reading Foundation Language Learner Literature Award

                        The Extensive Reading Foundation (ERF) is a new, unaffiliated, not-for
                        profit group to support and promote extensive reading in language education.
                        As its first initiative, the ERF has established an award for language
                        learner literature (graded readers) in English.

                        There are four categories of the Award for individual books:
                        Adolescents & Adults (3 categories)
                        Beginner
                        Intermediate
                        Advanced
                        Younger Learners (1 category).

                        The Award is annual, for books published in the previous year. However, in
                        2004, the inaugural year, the Award is for any books in print and
                        copyrighted up to and including 2003.

                        Publishers are invited to nominate up to three books in each category. The
                        nominated books will be read by an international jury of teachers and
                        extensive reading professionals who will come up with a shortlist of three
                        books in each category. These books are the Finalists. Language learners
                        and their teachers are then invited to vote online for their favorite books
                        among these Finalists. The jury will determine the winners taking into
                        account the views of their students, and the voting from all parts of the
                        world.

                        By regularly recognizing books of outstanding quality and appeal, the Award
                        aims to support the development of language learner literature in English,
                        and to encourage extensive reading in language programs. Publishers will
                        display the Award information on the covers of their finalist and winning
                        books. This will be seal of quality for teachers and students looking for
                        good books to read.

                        In this inaugural year, publishers nominate books by June 30th, 2004. The
                        Finalists are announced on July 31st, 2004. Online voting commences on
                        September 1st and closes on September 30th. The winners of the first Awards
                        will be announced toward the end of the year.

                        The ERF plans two further awards, for innovation and for outstanding
                        achievement. The names and details of these will be announced shortly.

                        For information on the ERF and on how to vote for the Finalists, see the ERF
                        homepage <www.erfoundation.org>. Publishers who want details on how to
                        nominate books may write to <bamford@...>
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