Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [ExtensiveReading] five-finger rule

Expand Messages
  • dk
    Sorry, I have no research on this. What I said was based on the value of skipping difficult words, implying i+2, which was discussed by Krashen and others on
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 1, 2009
    • 0 Attachment

      Sorry, I have no research on this. What I said was based on the value of “skipping” difficult words, implying i+2, which was discussed by Krashen and others on this list a couple years ago as well as the belief that if students are highly interested in the text then the text will be more useful than a text that is less interesting.

       

      However, if someone wants to make the case that reading something boring at exactly i+1 is more useful then I would be interested in their reasoning.

       

      Dave Kees

       

       

      From: ExtensiveReading@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ExtensiveReading@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Glen Hill
      Sent: Monday, November 30, 2009 4:09 PM
      To: ExtensiveReading@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [ExtensiveReading] five-finger rule

       

       

      I'm pretty new to this whole game, so please don't take my next remark in offense.  When we teachers say things like "I think" or "I feel", the scientist in me cringes.  Yes, we scientists (that's my background, hard science) like to play hunches from time to time, too, but in the case of social science, is there any hard data for the last couple of statements from Akio and Dave on whether students actually learn more (knowledge or vocabulary) when reading i+1 or 2?

      Or is this all just anecdotal and a case-by-case scenario?  My own hunch is that it is anecdotal, but if you guys could describe your scenarios that led to your beliefs, it would make me feel a lot better.

      Thanks, and apologies galore if this offends anyone.
      Glenski

      On Mon, Nov 30, 2009 at 6:55 AM, dk <davekees1@...> wrote:

       

      " However I feel that students who read "i+2" books acquire less


      vocabularies than the students who read "i+1" books."

      Without having any research available on it, I think a student who is
      reading something very interesting at i+2 will learn more than a student
      reading something not interesting at i+1.

      Dave

       

    • Akio FURUKAWA
      Dearr Glenn and list members, To tell the truth, I have been a math teacher for more than 20 years and I only started teaching English through extensive
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 1, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Dearr Glenn and list members,

        To tell the truth, I have been a math teacher for more than 20 years
        and I only started teaching English through extensive reading seven
        years ago.

        I know statistic well and the limitation of stastic well.
        I use "I think" or "I feel" from the observation of my students.
        I cannot prove it now but I have a feeling that I can prove in near future.

        As for i+2, some students are really enjoying (i+2) materials and keep
        reading, but
        many students who were enjoying (i+2) materials stop readiing because
        they were
        too tired to read through.

        So I do not recommend ER teachers to have the students read (i+2) materials.
        We should recommend a good book with i, i-1, i+1 readabiliy to each student.
        In order to do that, we should read a lot of easy books for our students.

        In my opinion (i+2) books for a student are the books which the student
        can read
        but with a little difficulty,
        (i+1) books for the student are the books which the he/she can read
        wihout difficult
        and i books for the student are the books which he/she can read easily.


        By the way I have to start extensive reading program by myself in my
        juku school,
        because no English teachers at my school wanted to involve in ER program.
        Now there are more students in our ER prorgram than in our traditional
        English program
        through grammar and translation.
        There were only 53 students in ER program in 2003 when I started ER
        program..
        There are 466 students in ER program and we have nine classrooms for
        ER program.

        ER program is great, one of my students who started studying English
        from ABC
        when he was seventh grader got 850 at TOEIC this year.
        He has read only the amount of 3M words and now he is enjoying Alex
        Ryder series.

        Cheers,

        FURUKAWA Akio
        SEG
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.