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Reading translations from L1?

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  • Clarissa C. S. Ryan
    Hi, everyone-- Day and Bramford s _Extensive Reading in the Second Language Classroom_ mentions translated works from the students L1 as an “often
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 5, 2007
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      Hi, everyone--

      Day and Bramford's _Extensive Reading in the Second Language Classroom_ mentions translated
      works from the students' L1 as an “often overlooked but excellent source of extensive
      reading material” (p. 105). They provide a couple of anecdotal examples, but no research and no references. I'd really like to be able to cite some actual research on the topic. Does anyone happen to know of any books or articles? I've tried some online searches, but as you can imagine, the obvious keywords don't really restrict the results enough to be useful. I'd like to put some references in my MATESOL captstone project about this, rather than just my assumption (and Day & Bramford's) that it's probably helpful. I'd appreciate any leads at all.

      Thanks!


      --
      Clarissa C. S. Ryan
      wintersweet@...
      http://www.sharedwing.net/

      http://www.readableblog.com/
      (for English language learners)
    • areej alawad
      Hi Clarissa, I did a paper once on authenticity in second language teaching and added the concept of using translated texts to the target language. Here it is:
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 6, 2007
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        Hi Clarissa,
         
        I did a paper once on authenticity in second language teaching and added the concept of using translated texts to the target language. Here it is:
         
        Gray, Ronald. (2000). Using Translated First Language Literature in the Second Language Classroom. The Internet TESL Journal, Vol. XI, No. 12, December 2005 http://iteslj.org/Techniques/Gray-TranslatedL1Literatue.html
         
        Hope it is of help.
         
        Wishes,
        Areej

        "Clarissa C. S. Ryan" <wintersweet@...> wrote:
        Hi, everyone--

        Day and Bramford's _Extensive Reading in the Second Language Classroom_ mentions translated
        works from the students' L1 as an “often overlooked but excellent source of extensive
        reading material” (p. 105). They provide a couple of anecdotal examples, but no research and no references. I'd really like to be able to cite some actual research on the topic. Does anyone happen to know of any books or articles? I've tried some online searches, but as you can imagine, the obvious keywords don't really restrict the results enough to be useful. I'd like to put some references in my MATESOL captstone project about this, rather than just my assumption (and Day & Bramford's) that it's probably helpful. I'd appreciate any leads at all.

        Thanks!


        --
        Clarissa C. S. Ryan
        wintersweet@...
        http://www.sharedwing.net/

        http://www.readableblog.com/
        (for English language learners)





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      • Julian Bamford
        Hi Clarissa, Stuart 1990 describes an English extensive reading course in China that used English translations of Chinese folktales. There are a few
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 6, 2007
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          Hi Clarissa,

          Stuart 1990 describes an English extensive reading course in China that
          used English translations of Chinese folktales.

          There are a few articles--Douglas 1996; Dupuy & McQuillan 1997; Malgwi
          1999--about students writing stories from their own culture. Toh &
          Raja 1997 talk about culturally relevant material being written for
          students but I don't know if this included translations or rewriting of
          L1 stories.

          The full references and abstracts for the above articles are in the
          Extensive Reading Bibliography:
          http://www.extensivereading.net/er/biblio.html

          Also re. folktales, there is an activity "Tell me a story" by Janet
          Watson in the Cambridge Handbook "Extensive Reading Activities for
          Teaching Language" (pp. 168-170). She makes the point that "if
          [students] find a story that is familiar to them in their own language,
          this provides an effective means of learning the English vocabulary
          necessary to tell the story."

          There is another Cambridge Handbook called "Using Folktales" by Eric
          Taylor which might be worth checking out.


          --j

          > Day and Bramford's _Extensive Reading in the Second Language
          > Classroom_ mentions translated
          > works from the students' L1 as an “often overlooked but excellent
          > source of extensive
          > reading material” (p. 105). They provide a couple of anecdotal
          > examples, but no research and no references. I'd really like to be
          > able to cite some actual research on the topic. Does anyone happen to
          > know of any books or articles? I've tried some online searches, but as
          > you can imagine, the obvious keywords don't really restrict the
          > results enough to be useful. I'd like to put some references in my
          > MATESOL captstone project about this, rather than just my assumption
          > (and Day & Bramford's) that it's probably helpful. I'd appreciate any
          > leads at all.
        • dk
          I ll take exception with Ronald Gray s paper: Using Translated First Language Literature in the Second Language Classroom. The Internet TESL Journal, Vol. XI,
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 7, 2007
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            I'll take exception with Ronald Gray's paper:

            Using Translated First Language Literature in the Second Language
            Classroom. The Internet TESL Journal, Vol. XI, No. 12, December 2005
            http://iteslj.org/Techniques/Gray-TranslatedL1Literatue.html

            There seems to be some lapses in the logical structure of the paper.

            Ronald Gray begins by stating five reasons why using literature in the
            classroom is supposed to be good.

            1. Helps students understand other cultures.
            2. It is an authentic example of language.
            3. It provides examples of language structure and can provide a prompt
            for oral work. 4. Students can find it enjoyable. 5. Can encourage
            students to read other literature.

            However,

            1. If you are using a translated text of L1 literature then the student
            will NOT learn about other cultures, will they? 2. Translations are not
            always authentic. In Chinese numbers and names are a story in themselves
            and play an important part in the novel but this cannot be translated.
            3. Yes, it does provide an example of language structure as does any
            example of English. It does provide a prompt for oral work but nearly
            anything can be used for this. 4. Students may find it enjoyable or they
            may find it boring. It's curious how students often want to avoid things
            that they are very familiar with. 5. Yes, it may encourage them to read
            other literature or discourage them if they find that reading something
            that they already know is boring.

            I have a few more things to say about this later.

            Dave Kees

            =======================================================
            Guangzhou, China - davekees@... - skype: davekees
            INSIGHTS-INTO-TEFL.blogspot.com DAVEKEES.blogspot.com
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