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ER and dyslexia

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  • carlos_teacher_77
    Hi every1, In the school where I work we have an ER program that covers from Primary School to the senior years of High SChool. This Program is in the database
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 14, 2007
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      Hi every1,

      In the school where I work we have an ER program that covers from
      Primary School to the senior years of High SChool. This Program is
      in the database of the group if you want more details. I teach 9th
      grade (age 14 - 15) and we do an ER 45-minute session every week. ER
      is evaluated in term of quantity and accuracy. Quantity simply
      refers to the number of texts students read during a term and
      accuracy means consistency of ideas students extrac from the text
      with those of the original text (it does not imply in any way
      grammatical accuracy, as a matter of fact, students can write the
      ideas they write in their L1 although all the texts are written in
      English). This program follows Pino-Silva's ER model (1992 and 2006).

      Anyway, the thing is that the mother of one of the students asked to
      see me about the activity because her son is dyslexic and she told
      that that he usually falls behind in quantity given the extra
      difficulty that reading in English imposed on him. We talked and
      worked out a solution for this particular student. After that, I
      surfed the net looking for articles that researched/discussed ER and
      dyslexic readers. I found some of general reading and dyslexia on L1
      but have hardly found anything specifically centered on ER in L2.

      I'd like to hear from you if you had had any similar experiences and
      what you have done in such cases. Beisdes, if ayone knows of or have
      access to an article on this, I think it would be excellent for the
      group if that person could share it with all -if possible

      Thanks
    • Brett Reynolds
      Richard Sparks and Lenore Ganschow have done a lot of work in this area. I haven t read anything by them in a few years, but, from what I remember, their
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 15, 2007
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        Richard Sparks and Lenore Ganschow have done a lot of work in this
        area. I haven't read anything by them in a few years, but, from what
        I remember, their recommendation was an exemption from foreign
        language requirements for dyslexic students. A paper discussing this
        option is here:
        <http://www.adfl.org/adfl/bulletin/v18n2/182013.htm>

        You could modify the requirement to extensive listening. Many graded
        readers come with audio version which could be used along with or
        instead of the readers.

        Best,
        Brett

        <http://english-jack.blogspot.com>

        -----------------------
        Brett Reynolds
        English Language Centre
        Humber Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning
        Toronto, Ontario, Canada
        brett.reynolds@...
      • Carlos Mayora
        Thanks for the time and your pront reply. I ll read the article carefully. Extensive listening sounds also as a good suggestion. Thanks again. Any other
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 16, 2007
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          Thanks for the time and your pront reply. I'll read the article carefully. Extensive listening sounds also as a good suggestion. Thanks again.
           
          Any other ideas/experiences from anyone else?


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        • gradedreading
          ... carefully. Extensive listening sounds also as a good suggestion. Thanks again. ... Dyslexia is a very problematic concept (see
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 21, 2007
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            --- In ExtensiveReading@yahoogroups.com, Carlos Mayora
            <carlos_teacher_77@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks for the time and your pront reply. I'll read the article
            carefully. Extensive listening sounds also as a good suggestion.
            Thanks again.
            >
            > Any other ideas/experiences from anyone else?
            >
            >

            Dyslexia is a very problematic concept (see
            http://www.channel4.com/news/microsites/D/dyslexia_myth/dyslexia.html#
            silence) for a brief summary of the issues.


            From my (daily) work with people identified as dyslexic I would say
            that the one common denominator is a dislike of/difficulty with
            reading extended pieces of text. Many will open admit that they avoid
            books wherever possible which clearly is not ideal when it comes to
            ER. There are, however, things that can be done to make the reading
            experience more accessible


            You will read a lot about using different coloured filters, paper
            etc, and this though may help in some cases, the core issue is
            phonological problems which cause difficulties with decoding.

            In practical terms this means making text as visually pleasing as
            possible – with lots of sub-headings, illustrations etc – while at
            the same time simplifying it (in terms of vocabulary, sentence length
            etc) as you would for a L2 reader.

            With younger children I do think that intensive reading
            recovery/phonics programmes can make a huge difference, but in my
            experience by early adulthood a dislike of reading is often deeply
            ingrained.



            Kieran McGovern



            Editor, EFL Reading

            http://www.gradedreading.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/index.html
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