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Paul Jennings book on reading

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  • George Jacobs
    Paul Jennings is a very popular author of books for children and teens. He s also a former teacher and teacher educator in Australia. Recently, he wrote a book
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 10, 2004
      Paul Jennings is a very popular author of books for children and teens. He's also a former teacher and teacher educator in Australia. Recently, he wrote a book for parents and others about how to encourage children to love reading: The reading bug � and how you can help your child to catch it.
       
      The ideas aren't new, but they are nicely expressed along with the author's own experiences and some clever drawings. Below are notes I took for my own use while reading the book.
       

       

      Jennings , P. (2003). The reading bug � and how you can help your child to catch it. Camberwell , Victor ia : Penguin.

       

      • The adults in children�s lives are key

       

      • Have a key points section in each chapter

       

      • Anyone who can read can help excite children about reading, even people who can�t read can do it

       

      • �If children love something you can�t stop them doing it� p. 2

       

      • � Reading do or with a child is an act of love� p. 2

       

      • We can�t leave everything to teachers. This includes before children start school and while children are in school. It includes supporting what teachers do in school, as well as encouraging children to do reading not connected to school

       

      • �If children don�t like something, you can�t make them do it� p. 6

       

      • Use the warm bath method to encourage children to enjoy reading. No pressure; no scolding

       

      • Reading aloud to children is a great way to show children that you care about them. Books and the conversations you have about books are great things to share with children. In this way, children form a pleasant, happy association with books.

       

      • Reading aloud should be a reward, not a punishment. We shouldn�t let it be something children have to do instead of what they want to do, such as watch tv.

       

      • Pay attention to a book�s appearance

       

      • Books that are below children�s level can be useful for building confidence, for encouraging children to read along, for promoting conversation

       

      • Once at a book signing, a woman told Jennings that she was buying one of his books for her grandson who didn�t like reading. She asked Jennings to write something in the book that would encourage the boy to read. He wrote, �Dear John, When you have finished reading this book, Grandma will give you fifty dollars.� p. 34

       

      • Reading aloud is a good way to help children whose reading level is lower than that of most of their classmates. By reading aloud books that children are reading in school, you help children be more prepared for silent reading of the same book.

       

      • p. 43 Example of how shorter sentences can be more comprehensible:

       

      Alfred, the boy who was carrying the sword, turned and, remembering what the wizard had taught him earlier that day, slashed upwards with the blade and nearly cut off the dragon�s head.

       

      Alfred fled from the dragon. He remembered what the wizard had taught him. He turned and slashed upward with his sword. The dragon�s head fell to the ground.

       

      • p. 52 �There are two creators of a story: the writer and the reader.�

       

      • Draw attention to words every now and then

       

      • Help children see patterns, such as repetitions or rhymes

       

      • p. 92 Notice how �monocle� is explained via context � from Tongue-Tied

       

      Plop. Yes, the lens flipped out. Then the other one. Plop. The wire frame was empty. I had done it. I stared at the two glass lenses. Then I quickly threw one of them into the box. It shimmered and vanished. I pushed the remaining lens on to one eye and closed the other. It was a lens for one eye. A monocle.

       

      • p. 115  �ghote spells fish.� F =gh as in tough, the I should come from the o in women, the sh sound from the t in nation, and the e is silent as in tame.

       

      • p. 116 There are 23 ways to write the oo sound in moon

       

      u-e as in tune

      ut as in fruit

      eu as in few

      ough as in trhough

      ou as in soup

      ugh as in Hugh

      ui-e as in bruise

      wo as in two

      oe as in canoe

      ieu as in lieu

      o- as in lose

      oup as in coup

      iu as in juijitsu

      oeu as in manoeuvre

      eu as in sleuth

      ous as in rendezvous

      ou-s as in mousse

      ooh as in pooh

      ue as in glue

      u as in flu

      u-e as in rule

      oo-e as in loose

       

      p. 119 Phonics encourages people to focus on the inside of a word instead of on the context

       

      • p. 124 phonic is best used as a last, not a first, resort
      • p. 125 �Sounding out letters is not reading. Reading is getting meaning from print.

       

      • If you see signs of lack of interest or of frustration, shift gears or stop all together.

       

      • p. 134 �It is now recognized that children�s writing must have purpose and joy and validity. When they participate in this creative process they are improving their reading and spelling skills enormously.

       

      • p. 145 �Spelling is only important because we think it is. � In Shakespeare�s time spelling was optional. In those days you could even spell a word differently the same page. As long as readers could recognize the word it didn�t matter.

       

      • p. 160 �Wordless picture books can be used to lift the esteem of reluctant readers who have difficulty with text.� They can also be used to start children writing or telling their own books.

       

      • In addition to drawing, to accompany their books, children can do maps, graphs, etc.

       

      • www.pauljennings.com  Authors� websites are a good place to find background information to accompany reading and also for finding addresses to write to.

       

      • Failure to understand can be caused by either the subject matter or by the language

       

      • p. 202 �I don�t mind people crying over stories. � It is because we can use our imagination to be someone else that we can forgo our own pleasures for the benefit of another. It is because people have imagined, that slavery ended. It is because people have imagined, that prisoners of conscious are often freed. It is because people can imagine, that we can hope one day fro freedom and justice in the world.� Language is about imagination, about symbols.

       

    • Tina Ferrato
      Hello, I want to thank George Jacobs for drawing our attention to Paul Jennings book, and for sharing his own notes taken while reading. Nice touch. This
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 10, 2004
        Hello,
        I want to thank George Jacobs for drawing our attention to Paul Jennings'
        book, and for sharing his own notes taken while reading. Nice touch. This
        book promises to be another favorite 'read' to re-visit, like Jim Trelease's
        "The Read-Aloud Handbook." Great book!
        Anyway, just want to say Thanks!
        Tina Ferrato
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