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new article on EW

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  • Robert Davis
    Alan Pryce-Jones: http://www.newcriterion.com/articles.cfm/The-pen-is-mightier-7570 A few anecdotes are worth the visit. RMD
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 1, 2013
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      Alan Pryce-Jones: http://www.newcriterion.com/articles.cfm/The-pen-is-mightier-7570

      A few anecdotes are worth the visit. RMD
    • Jeffrey Manley
      BBC4 last night transmitted an excellent docudrama entitled Wodehouse in Exile. As its title suggests, it describes the internment of PG Wodehouse by the
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 26, 2013
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        BBC4 last night transmitted an excellent docudrama entitled Wodehouse in Exile.  As its title suggests, it describes the internment of PG Wodehouse by the Nazis and his subsequent release and radio broadcasts.  The last half hour of the 90 minute program deals with his days in France after D-Day when Malcolm Muggeridge was the British intelligence liaison officer assigned to his case.  The actors playing Wodehouse, his wife and Muggeridge are absolutely perfect IMHO.  At one point the French police arrest Wodehouse as a collaborator.  Muggeridge has the British government intervene to secure his release.  When he meets him in the maternity hospital to which he is moved from prison, Muggeridge informs Wodehouse that Churchill sent a note insisting upon his release:  "Churchill's not your biggest fan but he doesn't want to give you to the French,"  Wodehouse replies:  "Was it Waugh who called him a second-rate radio personality? [Pause] Or was it me?"  It was Waugh who made the characterization but it appeared at a later time than 1944.  See John Wilson's article in Waugh Without End,  pp 255-56.  Nothing is mentioned about Waugh's efforts to exonerate Wodehouse, but those also came later. 

        I highly recommend the program which is posted on BBC iPlayer: http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01rlwy8/Wodehouse_in_Exile/

        It can be viewed on the internet in the UK or via a UK internet connection.  jeff 


      • Robert Davis
        George Orwell defended Wodehouse in almost the same terms as EW. ... me?  It was Waugh who made the characterization but it appeared at a later time than
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 26, 2013
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          George Orwell defended Wodehouse in almost the same terms as EW.


          From: Jeffrey Manley <manleyjm@...>
          To: waughblog <evelyn_waugh@yahoogroups.com>
          Cc: anthony vickery <admin@...>
          Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 6:29 AM
          Subject: [Evelyn_Waugh] waugh and wodehouse

           

          BBC4 last night transmitted an excellent docudrama entitled Wodehouse in Exile.  As its title suggests, it describes the internment of PG Wodehouse by the Nazis and his subsequent release and radio broadcasts.  The last half hour of the 90 minute program deals with his days in France after D-Day when Malcolm Muggeridge was the British intelligence liaison officer assigned to his case.  The actors playing Wodehouse, his wife and Muggeridge are absolutely perfect IMHO.  At one point the French police arrest Wodehouse as a collaborator.  Muggeridge has the British government intervene to secure his release.  When he meets him in the maternity hospital to which he is moved from prison, Muggeridge informs Wodehouse that Churchill sent a note insisting upon his release:  "Churchill's not your biggest fan but he doesn't want to give you to the French,"  Wodehouse replies:  "Was it Waugh who called him a second-rate radio personality? [Pause] Or was it me?"  It was Waugh who made the characterization but it appeared at a later time than 1944.  See John Wilson's article in Waugh Without End,  pp 255-56.  Nothing is mentioned about Waugh's efforts to exonerate Wodehouse, but those also came later. 

          I highly recommend the program which is posted on BBC iPlayer: http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01rlwy8/Wodehouse_in_Exile/

          It can be viewed on the internet in the UK or via a UK internet connection.  jeff 




        • myerstyson
          Dang. I now wish I still had my VPN. :(
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 27, 2013
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            Dang. I now wish I still had my VPN. :(

            --- In Evelyn_Waugh@yahoogroups.com, Jeffrey Manley <manleyjm@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > BBC4 last night transmitted an excellent docudrama entitled Wodehouse in Exile. As its title suggests, it describes the internment of PG Wodehouse by the Nazis and his subsequent release and radio broadcasts. The last half hour of the 90 minute program deals with his days in France after D-Day when Malcolm Muggeridge was the British intelligence liaison officer assigned to his case. The actors playing Wodehouse, his wife and Muggeridge are absolutely perfect IMHO. At one point the French police arrest Wodehouse as a collaborator. Muggeridge has the British government intervene to secure his release. When he meets him in the maternity hospital to which he is moved from prison, Muggeridge informs Wodehouse that Churchill sent a note insisting upon his release: "Churchill's not your biggest fan but he doesn't want to give you to the French," Wodehouse replies: "Was it Waugh who called him a second-rate radio personality? [Pause] Or was it me?" It was Waugh who made the characterization but it appeared at a later time than 1944. See John Wilson's article in Waugh Without End, pp 255-56. Nothing is mentioned about Waugh's efforts to exonerate Wodehouse, but those also came later.
            > I highly recommend the program which is posted on BBC iPlayer: http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01rlwy8/Wodehouse_in_Exile/
            > It can be viewed on the internet in the UK or via a UK internet connection. jeff
            >
          • Jeffrey Manley
            This week s Spectator has a review by British comedian and Waugh wonk Russell Kane on a reissue of Selina Hastings biography of Waugh. See link. He sets up
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 11 3:38 AM
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              This week's Spectator has a review by British comedian and Waugh wonk Russell Kane on a reissue of Selina Hastings' biography of Waugh.  See link.  He sets up a choice between Hastings and Sykes and dismisses the latter  as too close to the subject to be objective.  He also takes a pass on Paula Byrne's book as too limited in scope but doesn't even give Stannard a look in.  The review is both informative and (as would be expected) amusing.  Here's a sample: "Hastings inveigles you into Waugh’s world like a master storyteller, weaving into his life and works in a novelistic way; at times she appears to be a sort of Maeve Binchy on footnote cocaine."

              jeff





            • Jeffrey Manley
              I forgot to mention that Kane appeared on a BBC quiz program (may have been Mastermind) about a year or so ago and did very well on his special subject--Evelyn
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 11 5:43 AM
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                I forgot to mention that Kane appeared on a BBC quiz program (may have been Mastermind) about a year or so ago and did very well on his special subject--Evelyn Waugh.

                Who, BTW, is Maeve Binchy?  jeff


                To: evelyn_waugh@yahoogroups.com
                CC: admin@...
                From: manleyjm@...
                Date: Thu, 11 Apr 2013 06:38:18 -0400
                Subject: [Evelyn_Waugh] russsell kane on hastings on waugh

                 

                This week's Spectator has a review by British comedian and Waugh wonk Russell Kane on a reissue of Selina Hastings' biography of Waugh.  See link.  He sets up a choice between Hastings and Sykes and dismisses the latter  as too close to the subject to be objective.  He also takes a pass on Paula Byrne's book as too limited in scope but doesn't even give Stannard a look in.  The review is both informative and (as would be expected) amusing.  Here's a sample: "Hastings inveigles you into Waugh’s world like a master storyteller, weaving into his life and works in a novelistic way; at times she appears to be a sort of Maeve Binchy on footnote cocaine."


              • Gwyn Price-Evans
                I liked this review because of its light touch.  It s pitched for the Spectator s imagined milieu: the relaxed country house weekend.  A different
                Message 7 of 8 , Apr 11 6:43 AM
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                  I liked this review because of its light touch.  It's pitched for the Spectator's imagined milieu: the relaxed country house weekend.  A different publication might need a different approach with, perhaps, a reference to Stannard.  I look forward to reading the hard copy version when it arrives through the post.
                  GWYN



                  From: Jeffrey Manley <manleyjm@...>
                  To: waughblog <evelyn_waugh@yahoogroups.com>
                  Cc: anthony vickery <admin@...>
                  Sent: Thursday, 11 April 2013, 11:38
                  Subject: [Evelyn_Waugh] russsell kane on hastings on waugh

                   
                  This week's Spectator has a review by British comedian and Waugh wonk Russell Kane on a reissue of Selina Hastings' biography of Waugh.  See link.  He sets up a choice between Hastings and Sykes and dismisses the latter  as too close to the subject to be objective.  He also takes a pass on Paula Byrne's book as too limited in scope but doesn't even give Stannard a look in.  The review is both informative and (as would be expected) amusing.  Here's a sample: "Hastings inveigles you into Waugh’s world like a master storyteller, weaving into his life and works in a novelistic way; at times she appears to be a sort of Maeve Binchy on footnote cocaine."



                • jeffreymanley123
                  In today s NY Times Book Review an interviewer asked Clive James what books he enjoys rereading: Are you a rereader? What books do you find yourself
                  Message 8 of 8 , Apr 14 7:29 AM
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                    In today's NY Times Book Review an interviewer asked Clive James what books he enjoys rereading:

                    "Are you a rereader? What books do you find yourself returning to again and again?

                    I don't do much rereading anymore because I've been ill and feel that I'm running out of time. But recently I did reread all of Evelyn Waugh's novels, and was pleased to find that he was almost as thoughtful as, say, Olivia Manning, although his snobbery sometimes grates. Also, I enjoyed "Lucky Jim," by Kingsley Amis, all over again: the funniest novel I have ever read. Is there some Bulgarian equivalent, languishing untranslated? Probably not."

                    jeff
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