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Hungarian Waugh ?

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  • jeffreymanley123
    This week s TLS publishes a letter relating to an earlier review about translations in which it is claimed that the Hungarian writer Antal Szerb, as translated
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 5, 2011
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      This week's TLS publishes a letter relating to an earlier review about translations in which it is claimed that the Hungarian writer Antal Szerb, as translated by Len Rix, is a Hungarian Evelyn Waugh. The example given is The Pendragon Legend which was originally published in 1934 and has a plot involving a Hungarian visitor in England. From the excerpt on Amazon.co.uk, one might suppose that Szerb may have been influenced by D&F and VB. Whether those books were translated into Hungarian by 1934 or whether Szerb read English one can only surmise. The translation by Rix was published in 2006-07. Has anyone on the list read that book or anything else by Szerb? He died in 1945 in a concentration camp but several of his books have been translated and are currently in print (altho my local libraries do not seem to have discovered him). jeff
    • Robert Davis
      From a Hungarian expert in British literature and much else. Bob Davis -Szerb s English was excellent. The Pendragon book uses, with much fun and verve, some
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 6, 2011
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        From a Hungarian expert in British literature and much else. Bob Davis

        -Szerb's English was excellent. The Pendragon book uses, with much fun and verve, some of the conventions of the nineteen-twenties British satirical or comic novel as exemplified in the early Huxley or, if you like, Waugh, though grounds for further comparison end here. His other novel that has been making the rounds in a recent English translation "Journey by Moonlight" (1937) is even more un-Waugh-like.


        Black Mischief and A Handful of Dust were published in Hungarian translation in 1942 and 1935, respectively (in the reverse order of their original publication dates). The next Waugh novel that was translated was  Brideshead Revisited in 1948, three years after Szerb's death.


        Szerb may have read some of Waugh's novels (in fact, he read everything), and he didn't need translations to do this. He doesn't seem to have written anything about Waugh, though.


        For further, check http://www.kirjasto.sci.fi/szerb.htm



        --- On Wed, 1/5/11, jeffreymanley123 <manleyjm@...> wrote:

        From: jeffreymanley123 <manleyjm@...>
        Subject: [Evelyn_Waugh] Hungarian Waugh ?
        To: Evelyn_Waugh@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, January 5, 2011, 8:30 AM

         

        This week's TLS publishes a letter relating to an earlier review about translations in which it is claimed that the Hungarian writer Antal Szerb, as translated by Len Rix, is a Hungarian Evelyn Waugh. The example given is The Pendragon Legend which was originally published in 1934 and has a plot involving a Hungarian visitor in England. From the excerpt on Amazon.co.uk, one might suppose that Szerb may have been influenced by D&F and VB. Whether those books were translated into Hungarian by 1934 or whether Szerb read English one can only surmise. The translation by Rix was published in 2006-07. Has anyone on the list read that book or anything else by Szerb? He died in 1945 in a concentration camp but several of his books have been translated and are currently in print (altho my local libraries do not seem to have discovered him). jeff


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