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euchre roots

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  • Todd Martin
    Please ask the old folks..... Euchre genealogy! Now this could be fun. The documentation of birth, marriage and death of a card game. Sure, lets give it a
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 30, 2005
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      "Please ask the old folks....."
       
      Euchre genealogy! Now this could be fun. The documentation of birth, marriage and death of a card game. Sure, lets give it a shot. My grandparents were all born before 1913. None are alive to ask, but I remember them playing and no mention of a 32 was ever brought up. Yes, why is it the United States Playing Card Company insists on cramming 7's and 8's into the "Official Euchre Deck"? A genealogists will tell you to be careful about assuming facts. You have to have it documented before you use the ink. Will we be able to document the birth of "Euchre with a 24 card deck"? Well, sometimes when your diggin up your roots you hit a dead end and
      may have to try a lateral approach. Maybe the Canadians (Forced Loner) and Brit's (Benny) can help on this one. Euchre wise they are related but evolved into their own present games. 
       
      Just a Theory: World War I, 1914-1918. The world war brought us English speaking folk to help out the French from the Hun. OMG! There they are again. Could it be that our Dough Boy's in some far off FRENCH TRENCH threw out USPC's sevens and eights and invented the present game while dodging bullets? And back at HQ (headquarters) and the hospitals, GI's  (Yanks, Brits, Canucks and Aussie's) are battling each other with their own new version of euchre. I was in the military and when we weren't marching or eating we were playing cards.
      So with all do respect to the victors of WWI, let's call the present 24 card euchre deck, the
      "VE Deck" (victory in Europe) and here at home in Amer'ca "The Dough Boy Deck"! This is just a theory!
       
      I will ask around at the local Senior euchre get togethers.This is a very interesting subject which I hope can be documented some day. But until it happens I think we should still go ahead and drop the sevens and eights now, from publications and decks of cards so our decsendants won't be asking the same questions in the future.
       


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    • Todd Martin
      Please ask the old folks..... Euchre genealogy! Now this could be fun. The documentation of birth, marriage and death of a card game. Sure, lets give it a
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 30, 2005
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        "Please ask the old folks....."
         
        Euchre genealogy! Now this could be fun. The documentation of birth, marriage and death of a card game. Sure, lets give it a shot. My grandparents were all born before 1913. None are alive to ask, but I remember them playing and no mention of a 32 was ever brought up. Yes, why is it the United States Playing Card Company insists on cramming 7's and 8's into the "Official Euchre Deck"? A genealogists will tell you to be careful about assuming facts. You have to have it documented before you use the ink. Will we be able to document the birth of "Euchre with a 24 card deck"? Well, sometimes when your diggin up your roots you hit a dead end and
        may have to try a lateral approach. Maybe the Canadians (Forced Loner) and Brit's (Benny) can help on this one. Euchre wise they are related but evolved into their own present games. 
         
        Just a Theory: World War I, 1914-1918. The world war brought us English speaking folk to help out the French from the Hun. OMG! There they are again. Could it be that our Dough Boy's in some far off FRENCH TRENCH threw out USPC's sevens and eights and invented the present game while dodging bullets? And back at HQ (headquarters) and the hospitals, GI's  (Yanks, Brits, Canucks and Aussie's) are battling each other with their own new version of Euchre. I was in the military and when we weren't marching or eating we were playing cards.
        So with all do respect to the victors of WWI, let's call the present 24 card euchre deck, the
        "VE Deck" (victory in Europe) and here at home in Amer'ca "The Dough Boy Deck"!
         
        I will ask around at the local Senior euchre get togethers.This is a very interesting subject which I hope can be documented some day. But until it happens I think we should still go ahead and drop the sevens and eights now, from publications and decks of cards so our decsendants won't be asking the same questions in the future.
         


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      • Natty Bumppo
        You have posited a hypothesis, son, not a theory. We need more than a supposition for a theory; we need a little evidence. The Doughboys were spared trench
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 1, 2005
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          You have posited a hypothesis, son, not a theory. We need more than a
          supposition for a theory; we need a little evidence.

          The Doughboys were spared trench warfare, by and large. The U.S. did
          not enter the war until 1917, and few American troops set foot in
          Europe before March of 1918.

          None of this is to say that they avoided warfare. It was hot while it
          lasted. . . .

          Todd Martin <jtmwingnut@y...> wrote:

          > . . . Just a Theory: World War I, 1914-1918. . . . Could it be
          > that our Dough Boy's in some far off FRENCH TRENCH threw out USPC's
          > sevens and eights and invented the present game while dodging
          > bullets? . . .
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