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Re: What to play?

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  • bimbert84
    Hi Joe, ... But can t one argue if I m on offense here, and I expect you to save a doubleton, I might be more inclined to go alone without a doubleton? It s a
    Message 1 of 77 , Mar 1 6:00 AM
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      Hi Joe,

      > And he likely has a doubleton, particularly if his
      > trump is weak. If his trump is stronger, he would
      > be more likely to go alone despite being triple suited.
      >
      > If my spade beats only 2 others, I would probably bet
      > on the doubleton in hearts, even if it only beat 1
      > other heart.

      But can't one argue if I'm on offense here, and I expect you to save
      a doubleton, I might be more inclined to go alone without a doubleton?

      It's a catch-22: save this because maker's more likely to have it
      since he went alone; but since maker knows that, he's more likely to
      go alone with the opposite; but since you know that you're more
      likely to save the opposite....

      Where does it end?

      -- Rob
    • Ryan Romanik
      ... I agree 100%. I think that in Euchre, you win more from your opponents bad play, as opposed to your own partnerships brilliance. It s for this reason that
      Message 77 of 77 , Mar 29 5:32 PM
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        --- In EuchreScience@yahoogroups.com, "Natty Bumppo" <borf@b...>
        wrote:
        > "bimbert84" wrote:
        >
        > > . . . With regular partners
        > > skilled ones will beat poor
        > > ones most of the time. . . .
        >
        > But only if, or because, they
        > make fewer errors, is what I
        > am suggesting -- not because
        > they make more clever plays.

        I agree 100%. I think that in Euchre, you win more from your
        opponents' bad play, as opposed to your own partnerships brilliance.
        It's for this reason that I've always maintained that the most
        important factor in deciding whether you win a game or not is the
        skill level of your partner.

        >
        > > But if there are two sets of
        > > skilled partners, I agree chance
        > > will play a great part in deciding
        > > the winner.
        >
        > Oh, of course. And what I am
        > suggesting further is that adhesion
        > to principle (i.e., making fewer
        > mistakes -- and this MAY mean playing a little more conservatively
        > than we normally would) is what will tip the balance set by
        chance, in
        > the long run.


        I've given this a lot of thought, and I'm convinced that an
        extremely aggressive bidding style is probably correct for most
        Euchre games. Most Euchre players that I encounter don't make trump
        ENOUGH, as opposed to calling too often. Of course, if your
        opponents take this to the extreme, then passive play is better;
        essentially "handing off" to your partner. However, even when your
        left side opponent is extremely passive, you should still call a
        lot, to block him the times he does indeed have a hand. Remember:
        your opponents can never get 4 points if they never get to call it.

        -Ryan!
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