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Re: How much does a Master's help?

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  • Cheryl Johncox
    Kara, Is the MSU listserve you were refering to a Yahoo listserve? I tried to search for it on yahoo groups and came up empty. I would like to sign up. Thanks
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 1, 2009
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      Kara,
      Is the MSU listserve you were refering to a Yahoo listserve? I tried to search for it on yahoo groups and came up empty.
      I would like to sign up.

      Thanks
      Cheryl Johncox


      --- In EnviroJobs@yahoogroups.com, Kara Johnson <travellingfools@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Hi Keith,
      > I would be careful about going to a British school as an American unless you have a Commonwealth joint citizenship or you can secure your funding. My experience with foreign schools was that there was no money or scholarships for American students and the international tuition was quite high (I was looking at St. Andrews in Scotland, University College Galway).
      >
      > When I first was researching graduate schools, I was in the same position as you were, looking for something to get me to that next step, which I thought would be a master's degree. When I started my master's program in 2003, it was appropriate for me to get the kind of position I was interested in with a master's (research or education coordinator). By the time I finished my program in 2006, the money had fallen out of the marine and environmental research and education fields. As such, positions that traditionally I should have qualified for were being taken up by those with PhDs who were displaced from their previous jobs due to lack of funding (most all positions in marine and environmental research or education come from soft monies). I am now in a position where I have three degrees related to marine research and education, over 10 years of informal teaching, almost 10 years of marine and environmental field data collection, and I cannot get a position because I am competing with those with PhDs (I currently work out of my field and do a lot of volunteer work to stay in the loop).
      >
      > Right now, it seems that there is hope that money will be flowing back into the environmental fields, but it will take awhile. I would look for a program that allows you to do either a master's or PhD, and then you can get a feel in a couple of years if the market is right for you with only a master's and if not, you can stay in your program and develop your project into a PhD. Going back to school would allow you to have a more complete knowledge of current technologies, hot areas of interest, and allow you to develop your own interests.
      >
      > Be careful of funding, you want to get into a situation where your funding is at least partially (if not completely) paid and you can get some sort of teaching or research assistantship.
      >
      > Do you know about the MSU FWGRADSJOBS listserv? There are often master's and PhD positions, as well as jobs that are apporpriate to those education levels, posted for environmental and wildlife interests. MSU does another listserv for positions that do not requre a PhD or masters, but I can't find that link right away.
      >
      > Good luck!
      > Kara
      >
      >
      > > Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 13:35:48 +0000
      > > From: EnviroJobs@yahoogroups.com
      > > To: EnviroJobs@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: [EnviroJobs] Digest Number 2271
      > >
      > > There is 1 message in this issue.
      > >
      > > Topics in this digest:
      > >
      > > 1. How much does a Master's help?
      > > From: keithakirkpatrick
      > >
      > >
      > > Message
      > > ________________________________________________________________________
      > > 1. How much does a Master's help?
      > > Posted by: "keithakirkpatrick" keithakirkpatrick@... keithakirkpatrick
      > > Date: Mon Mar 30, 2009 8:42 pm ((PDT))
      > >
      > > I graduated with a BS in environmental studies in 2002 and haven't been able to find a good job in this (broad) field. Since graduation I've mostly worked odd jobs and a few that could (at best) be viewed as tangentially related to my field of study.
      > >
      > > If I go back to school and get a Masters, would prospective employers view me in a new, fresh light? More like a recent college graduate again? or would the years between my BS and Masters, where I didn't accomplish anything of note, hold me back?
      > >
      > > More information: I'm an American hopefull of going to a British university in the fall and getting a MSc in Ecology and Conservation and parlay that into a position in the not for profit or government sector.
      > >
      > > Any input is much appreciated. Thanks.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Messages in this topic (1)
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      > >
      >
      > _________________________________________________________________
      > Quick access to Windows Live and your favorite MSN content with Internet Explorer 8.
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      >
    • matt_lauffer
      I know a lot of people I work with have just a BS, but just as many have a MS. I didn t know many PhDs until I started a new job - and most of the ones in my
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 1, 2009
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        I know a lot of people I work with have just a BS, but just as many have a MS. I didn't know many PhDs until I started a new job - and most of the ones in my company are from outside the USA (stopping at the MS or PhD level outside the USA is a whole different ballgame than in the states).

        I have a MS, but it still took me a year to find a job after I got it in 2004. I do ecology work and run into the situation that what I need to know isn't really taught in college (other than some taxonomic skills) but to get a job I needed experience. Eventually I found a place willing to take a chance with me. I was told that a big part of why I got it is I took some of the certification classes (like the wetland delineation one) on my own and they knew I was serious about the field.

        That being said, I still don't know how to get an "in" to government work unless you are fortunate enough to intern with an agency while in undergraduate. Its really hard to get in unless you're an internal applicant. Yet for the PADEP at least you can't intern unless you're a current undergrad! I wish I had known that when I was in undergraduate.


        --- In EnviroJobs@yahoogroups.com, "G. Aleksiev" <xcomu@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Kara and hi all,
        >  
        > Further to this issue I would like to enrich a bit this topic about PhD degrees. Do you think it is a matter of importance the location -  where exactly the PhD degree is obtained - for. ex. if you porsue working oportunities in US or EU having PhD degree in Soth Korea? 
        >   
        >
        > --- On Tue, 3/31/09, Kara Johnson <travellingfools@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > From: Kara Johnson <travellingfools@...>
        > Subject: [EnviroJobs] RE: How much does a Master's help?
        > To: envirojobs@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Tuesday, March 31, 2009, 11:38 AM
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Hi Keith,
        > I would be careful about going to a British school as an American unless you have a Commonwealth joint citizenship or you can secure your funding. My experience with foreign schools was that there was no money or scholarships for American students and the international tuition was quite high (I was looking at St. Andrews in Scotland, University College Galway).
        >
        > When I first was researching graduate schools, I was in the same position as you were, looking for something to get me to that next step, which I thought would be a master's degree. When I started my master's program in 2003, it was appropriate for me to get the kind of position I was interested in with a master's (research or education coordinator) . By the time I finished my program in 2006, the money had fallen out of the marine and environmental research and education fields. As such, positions that traditionally I should have qualified for were being taken up by those with PhDs who were displaced from their previous jobs due to lack of funding (most all positions in marine and environmental research or education come from soft monies). I am now in a position where I have three degrees related to marine research and education, over 10 years of informal teaching, almost 10 years of marine and environmental field data collection, and I cannot get a
        > position because I am competing with those with PhDs (I currently work out of my field and do a lot of volunteer work to stay in the loop).
        >
        > Right now, it seems that there is hope that money will be flowing back into the environmental fields, but it will take awhile. I would look for a program that allows you to do either a master's or PhD, and then you can get a feel in a couple of years if the market is right for you with only a master's and if not, you can stay in your program and develop your project into a PhD. Going back to school would allow you to have a more complete knowledge of current technologies, hot areas of interest, and allow you to develop your own interests.
        >
        > Be careful of funding, you want to get into a situation where your funding is at least partially (if not completely) paid and you can get some sort of teaching or research assistantship.
        >
        > Do you know about the MSU FWGRADSJOBS listserv? There are often master's and PhD positions, as well as jobs that are apporpriate to those education levels, posted for environmental and wildlife interests. MSU does another listserv for positions that do not requre a PhD or masters, but I can't find that link right away.
        >
        > Good luck!
        > Kara
        >
        > > Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 13:35:48 +0000
        > > From: EnviroJobs@yahoogro ups.com
        > > To: EnviroJobs@yahoogro ups.com
        > > Subject: [EnviroJobs] Digest Number 2271
        > >
        > > There is 1 message in this issue.
        > >
        > > Topics in this digest:
        > >
        > > 1. How much does a Master's help?
        > > From: keithakirkpatrick
        > >
        > >
        > > Message
        > > ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
        > > 1. How much does a Master's help?
        > > Posted by: "keithakirkpatrick" keithakirkpatrick@ yahoo.com keithakirkpatrick
        > > Date: Mon Mar 30, 2009 8:42 pm ((PDT))
        > >
        > > I graduated with a BS in environmental studies in 2002 and haven't been able to find a good job in this (broad) field. Since graduation I've mostly worked odd jobs and a few that could (at best) be viewed as tangentially related to my field of study.
        > >
        > > If I go back to school and get a Masters, would prospective employers view me in a new, fresh light? More like a recent college graduate again? or would the years between my BS and Masters, where I didn't accomplish anything of note, hold me back?
        > >
        > > More information: I'm an American hopefull of going to a British university in the fall and getting a MSc in Ecology and Conservation and parlay that into a position in the not for profit or government sector.
        > >
        > > Any input is much appreciated. Thanks.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Messages in this topic (1)
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -
        > >
        >
        > ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
        > Quick access to Windows Live and your favorite MSN content with Internet Explorer 8.
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        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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