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Re: [EngFor] What does the phrase "to get caught "sleeping on the job."" means?

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  • Natasha The Bear
    From: Ann English To: EngFor@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, November 29, 2011 1:51 AM Subject: Re: [EngFor] What does the phrase to
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 1, 2011
      From: Ann English <Ann.English@...>
      To: EngFor@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, November 29, 2011 1:51 AM
      Subject: Re: [EngFor] What does the phrase "to get caught "sleeping on the job."" means?


       

      On 29/11/2011, at 6:43 pm, honeybadger_jp wrote:

      > The sentence " it's still not a good idea to get caught "sleeping on the job." "
      >
      > means in other words
      >
      > " it's not good that you are warned when you are sleeping during job. "
      >
      > , doesn't it?
      >
      > ****************************************************
      > Some companies even have nap rooms or nap lounges.
      > In the future, a nap break may be as common as a coffee break.
      > But until then, it's still not a good idea to get caught "sleeping on the job"
      >
      >

      ** We use the adjective and noun phrase "sleeping on the job" as a metaphor for laziness and incompetence. The job is the metaphor for important work that should be done well. The laziness and incompetence continues for a period of time. Use the adverb "while".

      A similar adjective phrase is "asleep at the wheel" meaning not reacting to danger: the wheel is the steering wheel of a ship or a vehicle. The ship is the metaphor for any business that should be controlled properly. The failure is immediate. Use the adverb "when".

      Examples: BP were guilty of sleeping on the job while the oil continued to flow.
      The bankers were asleep at the wheel when they allowed Greece to join the Euro.

      Honeybadger, the article you read says that naps are a good thing, and that companies know this. But, the article finishes, it's still not good to be lazy and incompetent - that is the usual meaning of "sleeping on the job."

      Kind regards

      Ann
      www.lulu.com/AnnEnglish




      lol, just an editorial comment: "The bankers were asleep at the wheel when they created the Euro to begin with!"

      Tasha

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • honeybadger_jp
      Thank you for the profound explanation. I understood.
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 1, 2011
        Thank you for the profound explanation.
        I understood.

        --- In EngFor@yahoogroups.com, Ann English <Ann.English@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > On 29/11/2011, at 6:43 pm, honeybadger_jp wrote:
        >
        > > The sentence " it's still not a good idea to get caught "sleeping on the job." "
        > >
        > > means in other words
        > >
        > > " it's not good that you are warned when you are sleeping during job. "
        > >
        > > , doesn't it?
        > >
        > > ****************************************************
        > > Some companies even have nap rooms or nap lounges.
        > > In the future, a nap break may be as common as a coffee break.
        > > But until then, it's still not a good idea to get caught "sleeping on the job"
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        > ** We use the adjective and noun phrase "sleeping on the job" as a metaphor for laziness and incompetence. The job is the metaphor for important work that should be done well. The laziness and incompetence continues for a period of time. Use the adverb "while".
        >
        > A similar adjective phrase is "asleep at the wheel" meaning not reacting to danger: the wheel is the steering wheel of a ship or a vehicle. The ship is the metaphor for any business that should be controlled properly. The failure is immediate. Use the adverb "when".
        >
        > Examples: BP were guilty of sleeping on the job while the oil continued to flow.
        > The bankers were asleep at the wheel when they allowed Greece to join the Euro.
        >
        > Honeybadger, the article you read says that naps are a good thing, and that companies know this. But, the article finishes, it's still not good to be lazy and incompetent - that is the usual meaning of "sleeping on the job."
        >
        > Kind regards
        >
        > Ann
        > www.lulu.com/AnnEnglish
        >
      • honeybadger_jp
        ... I understand what you meant.
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 2, 2011
          >lol, just an editorial comment: "The bankers were asleep at the wheel >when they created the Euro to begin with!"

          >Tasha

          I understand what you meant.
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