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Re: [energyresources] Update for February 25, 2013 (Newsletter - Currency Thoughts -3)

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  • Gerry Agnew
    When Denis writes that there are few signs of that wisdom emerging he is absolutely correct. What is likely to happen is that there will be a terrible
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 26, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      When Denis writes that "there are few signs of that wisdom emerging" he is absolutely correct. What is likely to happen is that there will be a terrible scramble for what wealth remains. We shall see currency debasement schemes to make local goods and products more attractive to would be buyers on global markets and so generate locally made jobs and the like. We are seeing some of this already with Japan's rather blatant attempts to reflate their economy and give their ultra-hardpressed domestic industries a break. The British are a bit more refined with all of this by buying up large quantities of Treasury securities from banks via Bank of England deposits into the banks in London (aka "money printing"). Today we see this taken one step further with an article in the Daily Mail about possibly introducing negative interest rates into the British economy.

      After this fails (as it will as not everyone can devalue their currency against every other currency) we shall see trade wars such as what we saw in the 1930s as everybody wants to export their goods and keep out competitors. Clearly, same logic, this cannot be done by everybody. It may be that this is the reason why the EU is so frantic to get some sort of trade agreement (FTA) with the US and clearly as quickly as possible. They have an excellent idea of what lies just around the corner. In short this is a dreadful mess awaiting!

      In having researched this sort of thing for most of my life, I can advise that we are looking at things going to get worse as more and more printed wealth seeks to find homes in a falling real market for good and services. Future generations will indeed wonder at the ignorance of a society which is doing what I see unfolding. It is a scramble with Devil take the hindmost. Grab all you can and show no care for the long term damage which is being done. This comment may also tend to explain why the world's majors are grabbing all of the oil resources that they can and are holding on like grim death. It is consistent (along with EU trade agreements) with a realisation that things will not continue as they are. Better have all of the "stuff" you can under lock and key before the first bread and jobs riots (think Greece here) start to make waves in the global press.

      It is not a pleasant picture!

      Gerry

      ************************************************************************************
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Denis Frith
      To: Google IPP Group
      Cc: energyresources@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 5:50 PM
      Subject: Fw: [energyresources] Update for February 25, 2013 (Newsletter - Currency Thoughts -3)



      As usual, Gerry follows the money in discussing global trade activities. There is no questioning his views on the decisions being made by the powerful in their quest to make more money. However, this is like a group of old people discussing their future plans without taking into account the obvious limitations. No doubt many will look to gain from what climate change is doing - until reality hits home. This view is understandable because there is nothing they can do to stop climate change and other deleterious aspects of what industrialization has done. But more understanding of tangible physical reality and less focusing on the false lead of intangible money flow could help to ease the inevitable powering down as natural material resources run out. However, there are few signs of that wisdom emerging so society is going to leave the legacy of the unsustainable process driven by money. Future generations will wonder at the ignorance of a society that
      believed in the ability of consuming natural resources and devastating the environment without having to pay the price.

      Denis Frith

      ----- Forwarded Message -----
      From: Gerry Agnew gaea@...>
      To: Frank Holland frankholland3@...>; energyresources@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, 26 February 2013 3:40 AM
      Subject: [energyresources] Update for February 25, 2013 (Newsletter - Currency Thoughts -3)



      For my energy readers: This is the third in a five part series I have been writing for my newsletter on major events which could influence currency markets going forward. In this segment, I am looking at what the leaders of the EU and Canada are thinking about global warming. My conclusion is that all of them believe that this phenomenon is a done deal. How can one be so sure? We simply follow the money (as always) which never fails. What they are doing is allowing for this to happen (not that anything can be done at this stage) and then structuring their trade flows around this. In this way they acknowledge what is happening but are trying to maintain a degree of continuity to blunt the effects (perceived or real) on the minds of their citizens. Citizens with blunted minds are less likely to rebel is how I see it!

      Let's continue with FTA (EU here) from last week.

      However, that is not all the EU has been doing. They are looking to open an FTA with Japan (as a gateway to what we used to call The Orient), although if some sort of war involving that nation breaks out this may not be a good idea! Nevertheless, they are pushing this hard despite the fact that the raw economic numbers may not be that good. If you are scratching your head on this one, I would ask that you do some research from the excellent files of the German newspaper Der Spiegel over the last few months. In particular, I am referring to a study done about cutting off large amounts of time and distance from shipments between the EU and The Orient by using a de-glaciated Arctic (again, think global warming here). Suddenly, the economics of transit between Japan and the EU make a great deal of sense and the numbers being tossed around, publicly at any rate, are not quite as silly as they look. Follow the money! (As always!). It will not let you down and
      it seems to me that the major powers in the US and EU know full well that global warming (to a decent extent anyhow) is now a done deal and as such economic advantage must be taken.

      Looking at Canada again, we see this global warming argument is now quite a reasonable bet. We can also see (again thanking Der Spiegel) studies have been done which show that with the fairly rapid retreat of the Arctic glaciers in recent decades, that the fabled Northwest Passage is now opening up and is probably going to be open to deep sea shipping sooner rather than later. Lots of distance shaved off by sending Asian goods through the Bering Strait and through Northern Canada I would have thought! Two more Canadian items for you to consider here (again, keeping in mind this wretched CETA). I refer to my recent letters on Izok and Gondor and possible exploitation of huge reserves of minerals from the impoverished Canadian territory of Nunavut. A port (to get these to the EU) would be built close to the Northwest Passage, which again implies that it will be ice free long enough each year to make all of this worthwhile.

      Finally, if we look at the comings and going of Canada's Prime Minister, we see that he often goes to the Arctic to be seen giving speeches and to be strutting about. He has done this since he won power in the 2006 elections. The question is why, given that few of Canada's previous holders of this office have even bothered with this huge, but virtually uninhabited area of the country. I think now we have our answer: money and trade. The EU has probably overplayed its hand in looking at the north AND global warming, and Mr. Harper knows it. If I am right about this knowledge of the EU and its apparent desperate attempt to use the ice free Arctic, then Mr. Harper can develop the northern portions of the North American continent to huge advantage for Canada.

      The big thing I am looking at today is the fact that "all of a sudden" the so far rather quiet attempts by various parties in the US and EU to establish an FTA between these two giant blocs (the two biggest in the world I read) have become something more. It seems that after the aforementioned Karel de Gucht had paid his respects to Canada's Prime Minister Stephen Harper, he was off to Washington to discuss something similar with some very influential White House types. I have no idea what he promised Mr. Harper to get the Canada/EU talks wound up in short order, but the question is what he told the Americans. I can legitimately ask this for after the visit, Mr. de Gucht was applauded by leaders in the EU and President Obama, in his annual State of the Union address, said that the time had come for such an agreement to be negotiated. The EU was, as may be imagined, ecstatic and in reading about this I could only find one moderately short article which
      was against it. So, why is there so much interest by the EU is lining up Free Trade Agreements with Canada, Japan, and the USA in short order? The question, like everything else, is one of money.

      Gerry

      ******************************************************************************************



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Denis Frith
      Gerry discusses below how the powerful in global society are likely to respond to the developing global economic contraction. He discusses the impact of the
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 26, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Gerry discusses below how the powerful in global society are likely to respond to the developing global economic contraction. He discusses the impact of the conflicting monetary decisions. He discusses only how Myopia will be operating.

        Whilst this is happening, the Real world will be continuing as usual. Natural resources, including oil, will continue to irrevocably deplete. The wastes produced by industry will continue deleteriously impact on the environment, including changing the climate and disrupting the marine eco system while polluting land, sea, air and organisms, including people. The infrastructure of civilization, including the cities, will continue to demand some of the remaining natural resources for operation and maintenance, even as they irrevocably age.

        The Myopia world is an intangible world of human views governing decisions, good and bad. The tangible Real world obeys natural forces and does not recognize the wishes and desires of that invasive species, Homo sapiens.

        Denis Frith


        ----- Forwarded Message -----
        From: Gerry Agnew <gaea@...>
        To: energyresources@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, 27 February 2013 8:23 AM
        Subject: Re: [energyresources] Update for February 25, 2013 (Newsletter - Currency Thoughts -3)


         
        When Denis writes that "there are few signs of that wisdom emerging" he is absolutely correct. What is likely to happen is that there will be a terrible scramble for what wealth remains. We shall see currency debasement schemes to make local goods and products more attractive to would be buyers on global markets and so generate locally made jobs and the like. We are seeing some of this already with Japan's rather blatant attempts to reflate their economy and give their ultra-hardpressed domestic industries a break. The British are a bit more refined with all of this by buying up large quantities of Treasury securities from banks via Bank of England deposits into the banks in London (aka "money printing"). Today we see this taken one step further with an article in the Daily Mail about possibly introducing negative interest rates into the British economy.

        After this fails (as it will as not everyone can devalue their currency against every other currency) we shall see trade wars such as what we saw in the 1930s as everybody wants to export their goods and keep out competitors. Clearly, same logic, this cannot be done by everybody. It may be that this is the reason why the EU is so frantic to get some sort of trade agreement (FTA) with the US and clearly as quickly as possible. They have an excellent idea of what lies just around the corner. In short this is a dreadful mess awaiting!

        In having researched this sort of thing for most of my life, I can advise that we are looking at things going to get worse as more and more printed wealth seeks to find homes in a falling real market for good and services. Future generations will indeed wonder at the ignorance of a society which is doing what I see unfolding. It is a scramble with Devil take the hindmost. Grab all you can and show no care for the long term damage which is being done. This comment may also tend to explain why the world's majors are grabbing all of the oil resources that they can and are holding on like grim death. It is consistent (along with EU trade agreements) with a realisation that things will not continue as they are. Better have all of the "stuff" you can under lock and key before the first bread and jobs riots (think Greece here) start to make waves in the global press.

        It is not a pleasant picture!

        Gerry

        ************************************************************************************
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Denis Frith
        To: Google IPP Group
        Cc: energyresources@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 5:50 PM
        Subject: Fw: [energyresources] Update for February 25, 2013 (Newsletter - Currency Thoughts -3)

        As usual, Gerry follows the money in discussing global trade activities. There is no questioning his views on the decisions being made by the powerful in their quest to make more money. However, this is like a group of old people discussing their future plans without taking into account the obvious limitations. No doubt many will look to gain from what climate change is doing - until reality hits home. This view is understandable because there is nothing they can do to stop climate change and other deleterious aspects of what industrialization has done. But more understanding of tangible physical reality and less focusing on the false lead of intangible money flow could help to ease the inevitable powering down as natural material resources run out. However, there are few signs of that wisdom emerging so society is going to leave the legacy of the unsustainable process driven by money. Future generations will wonder at the ignorance of a society that
        believed in the ability of consuming natural resources and devastating the environment without having to pay the price.

        Denis Frith

        ----- Forwarded Message -----
        From: Gerry Agnew gaea@...>
        To: Frank Holland frankholland3@...>; energyresources@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, 26 February 2013 3:40 AM
        Subject: [energyresources] Update for February 25, 2013 (Newsletter - Currency Thoughts -3)

        For my energy readers: This is the third in a five part series I have been writing for my newsletter on major events which could influence currency markets going forward. In this segment, I am looking at what the leaders of the EU and Canada are thinking about global warming. My conclusion is that all of them believe that this phenomenon is a done deal. How can one be so sure? We simply follow the money (as always) which never fails. What they are doing is allowing for this to happen (not that anything can be done at this stage) and then structuring their trade flows around this. In this way they acknowledge what is happening but are trying to maintain a degree of continuity to blunt the effects (perceived or real) on the minds of their citizens. Citizens with blunted minds are less likely to rebel is how I see it!

        Let's continue with FTA (EU here) from last week.

        However, that is not all the EU has been doing. They are looking to open an FTA with Japan (as a gateway to what we used to call The Orient), although if some sort of war involving that nation breaks out this may not be a good idea! Nevertheless, they are pushing this hard despite the fact that the raw economic numbers may not be that good. If you are scratching your head on this one, I would ask that you do some research from the excellent files of the German newspaper Der Spiegel over the last few months. In particular, I am referring to a study done about cutting off large amounts of time and distance from shipments between the EU and The Orient by using a de-glaciated Arctic (again, think global warming here). Suddenly, the economics of transit between Japan and the EU make a great deal of sense and the numbers being tossed around, publicly at any rate, are not quite as silly as they look. Follow the money! (As always!). It will not let you down and
        it seems to me that the major powers in the US and EU know full well that global warming (to a decent extent anyhow) is now a done deal and as such economic advantage must be taken.

        Looking at Canada again, we see this global warming argument is now quite a reasonable bet. We can also see (again thanking Der Spiegel) studies have been done which show that with the fairly rapid retreat of the Arctic glaciers in recent decades, that the fabled Northwest Passage is now opening up and is probably going to be open to deep sea shipping sooner rather than later. Lots of distance shaved off by sending Asian goods through the Bering Strait and through Northern Canada I would have thought! Two more Canadian items for you to consider here (again, keeping in mind this wretched CETA). I refer to my recent letters on Izok and Gondor and possible exploitation of huge reserves of minerals from the impoverished Canadian territory of Nunavut. A port (to get these to the EU) would be built close to the Northwest Passage, which again implies that it will be ice free long enough each year to make all of this worthwhile.

        Finally, if we look at the comings and going of Canada's Prime Minister, we see that he often goes to the Arctic to be seen giving speeches and to be strutting about. He has done this since he won power in the 2006 elections. The question is why, given that few of Canada's previous holders of this office have even bothered with this huge, but virtually uninhabited area of the country. I think now we have our answer: money and trade. The EU has probably overplayed its hand in looking at the north AND global warming, and Mr. Harper knows it. If I am right about this knowledge of the EU and its apparent desperate attempt to use the ice free Arctic, then Mr. Harper can develop the northern portions of the North American continent to huge advantage for Canada.

        The big thing I am looking at today is the fact that "all of a sudden" the so far rather quiet attempts by various parties in the US and EU to establish an FTA between these two giant blocs (the two biggest in the world I read) have become something more. It seems that after the aforementioned Karel de Gucht had paid his respects to Canada's Prime Minister Stephen Harper, he was off to Washington to discuss something similar with some very influential White House types. I have no idea what he promised Mr. Harper to get the Canada/EU talks wound up in short order, but the question is what he told the Americans. I can legitimately ask this for after the visit, Mr. de Gucht was applauded by leaders in the EU and President Obama, in his annual State of the Union address, said that the time had come for such an agreement to be negotiated. The EU was, as may be imagined, ecstatic and in reading about this I could only find one moderately short article which
        was against it. So, why is there so much interest by the EU is lining up Free Trade Agreements with Canada, Japan, and the USA in short order? The question, like everything else, is one of money.

        Gerry

        ******************************************************************************************

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • sheree137
        Perhaps this relates to Myopia: corporate vision fettered by its legal imperative to return a profit for shareholders, regardless if it kills their
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 3, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Perhaps this relates to Myopia: corporate "vision" fettered by its legal imperative to return a profit for shareholders, regardless if it kills their progeny....
          Perhaps reform of US and/or multinational incorporation laws is an idea whose time is ripe at last. A corporation should, one would think, not be a danger to life, now or in the future.
          Why might this be an apt time for this idea?
          Now the media spin is the US has a "glut" of domestically extracted fossil fuels, and that the US should not "hoard" them, as if it is evil to hold onto them. Not so long ago, the justification for more US fossil fuel extraction was the need to provide for years of US use of fossil fuels. So, if the US exports future reserves now, how is that providing for future energy independence? Isn't it kicking the can down the road?
          The most prudent thing to do, from a national energy security perspective, would be for the US to LEAVE FOSSIL FUELS IN THE GROUND until thw US needs them. That, coincidentally, could help to lessen the prospect of some of the most disastrous effects of climate change.
          Why is the US tax structure providing incentives to fossil fuel companies that then turn around and profit by exporting US fuels? Is that not counterintuitive? How about removing the subsidies, so that fossil fuel prices are in line with some of the real costs (not mentioning the externalized costs, such as accelerated global warming, etc.)?
          I am an occasional lurker on this board, so perhaps y'all have roundly discussed this, but then again.... sometimes an idea needs traction, critical mass, a little push in the right direction.
          Maybe it's a realistic hope, not horror, that could ensue....

          Sheree Cammer
          New York State, US

          --- In energyresources@yahoogroups.com, Denis Frith <denisaf2000@...> wrote:
          >
          > Gerry discusses below how the powerful in global society are likely to respond to the developing global economic contraction. He discusses the impact of the conflicting monetary decisions. He discusses only how Myopia will be operating.
          >
          > Whilst this is happening, the Real world will be continuing as usual. Natural resources, including oil, will continue to irrevocably deplete. The wastes produced by industry will continue deleteriously impact on the environment, including changing the climate and disrupting the marine eco system while polluting land, sea, air and organisms, including people. The infrastructure of civilization, including the cities, will continue to demand some of the remaining natural resources for operation and maintenance, even as they irrevocably age.
          >
          > The Myopia world is an intangible world of human views governing decisions, good and bad. The tangible Real world obeys natural forces and does not recognize the wishes and desires of that invasive species, Homo sapiens.
          >
          > Denis Frith
          >
          >
          > ----- Forwarded Message -----
          > From: Gerry Agnew <gaea@...>
          > To: energyresources@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Wednesday, 27 February 2013 8:23 AM
          > Subject: Re: [energyresources] Update for February 25, 2013 (Newsletter - Currency Thoughts -3)
          >
          >
          >  
          > When Denis writes that "there are few signs of that wisdom emerging" he is absolutely correct. What is likely to happen is that there will be a terrible scramble for what wealth remains. We shall see currency debasement schemes to make local goods and products more attractive to would be buyers on global markets and so generate locally made jobs and the like. We are seeing some of this already with Japan's rather blatant attempts to reflate their economy and give their ultra-hardpressed domestic industries a break. The British are a bit more refined with all of this by buying up large quantities of Treasury securities from banks via Bank of England deposits into the banks in London (aka "money printing"). Today we see this taken one step further with an article in the Daily Mail about possibly introducing negative interest rates into the British economy.
          >
          > After this fails (as it will as not everyone can devalue their currency against every other currency) we shall see trade wars such as what we saw in the 1930s as everybody wants to export their goods and keep out competitors. Clearly, same logic, this cannot be done by everybody. It may be that this is the reason why the EU is so frantic to get some sort of trade agreement (FTA) with the US and clearly as quickly as possible. They have an excellent idea of what lies just around the corner. In short this is a dreadful mess awaiting!
          >
          > In having researched this sort of thing for most of my life, I can advise that we are looking at things going to get worse as more and more printed wealth seeks to find homes in a falling real market for good and services. Future generations will indeed wonder at the ignorance of a society which is doing what I see unfolding. It is a scramble with Devil take the hindmost. Grab all you can and show no care for the long term damage which is being done. This comment may also tend to explain why the world's majors are grabbing all of the oil resources that they can and are holding on like grim death. It is consistent (along with EU trade agreements) with a realisation that things will not continue as they are. Better have all of the "stuff" you can under lock and key before the first bread and jobs riots (think Greece here) start to make waves in the global press.
          >
          > It is not a pleasant picture!
          >
          > Gerry
          >
          > ************************************************************************************
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: Denis Frith
          > To: Google IPP Group
          > Cc: energyresources@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 5:50 PM
          > Subject: Fw: [energyresources] Update for February 25, 2013 (Newsletter - Currency Thoughts -3)
          >
          > As usual, Gerry follows the money in discussing global trade activities. There is no questioning his views on the decisions being made by the powerful in their quest to make more money. However, this is like a group of old people discussing their future plans without taking into account the obvious limitations. No doubt many will look to gain from what climate change is doing - until reality hits home. This view is understandable because there is nothing they can do to stop climate change and other deleterious aspects of what industrialization has done. But more understanding of tangible physical reality and less focusing on the false lead of intangible money flow could help to ease the inevitable powering down as natural material resources run out. However, there are few signs of that wisdom emerging so society is going to leave the legacy of the unsustainable process driven by money. Future generations will wonder at the ignorance of a society that
          > believed in the ability of consuming natural resources and devastating the environment without having to pay the price.
          >
          > Denis Frith
          >
          > ----- Forwarded Message -----
          > From: Gerry Agnew gaea@...>
          > To: Frank Holland frankholland3@...>; energyresources@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Tuesday, 26 February 2013 3:40 AM
          > Subject: [energyresources] Update for February 25, 2013 (Newsletter - Currency Thoughts -3)
          >
          > For my energy readers: This is the third in a five part series I have been writing for my newsletter on major events which could influence currency markets going forward. In this segment, I am looking at what the leaders of the EU and Canada are thinking about global warming. My conclusion is that all of them believe that this phenomenon is a done deal. How can one be so sure? We simply follow the money (as always) which never fails. What they are doing is allowing for this to happen (not that anything can be done at this stage) and then structuring their trade flows around this. In this way they acknowledge what is happening but are trying to maintain a degree of continuity to blunt the effects (perceived or real) on the minds of their citizens. Citizens with blunted minds are less likely to rebel is how I see it!
          >
          > Let's continue with FTA (EU here) from last week.
          >
          > However, that is not all the EU has been doing. They are looking to open an FTA with Japan (as a gateway to what we used to call The Orient), although if some sort of war involving that nation breaks out this may not be a good idea! Nevertheless, they are pushing this hard despite the fact that the raw economic numbers may not be that good. If you are scratching your head on this one, I would ask that you do some research from the excellent files of the German newspaper Der Spiegel over the last few months. In particular, I am referring to a study done about cutting off large amounts of time and distance from shipments between the EU and The Orient by using a de-glaciated Arctic (again, think global warming here). Suddenly, the economics of transit between Japan and the EU make a great deal of sense and the numbers being tossed around, publicly at any rate, are not quite as silly as they look. Follow the money! (As always!). It will not let you down and
          > it seems to me that the major powers in the US and EU know full well that global warming (to a decent extent anyhow) is now a done deal and as such economic advantage must be taken.
          >
          > Looking at Canada again, we see this global warming argument is now quite a reasonable bet. We can also see (again thanking Der Spiegel) studies have been done which show that with the fairly rapid retreat of the Arctic glaciers in recent decades, that the fabled Northwest Passage is now opening up and is probably going to be open to deep sea shipping sooner rather than later. Lots of distance shaved off by sending Asian goods through the Bering Strait and through Northern Canada I would have thought! Two more Canadian items for you to consider here (again, keeping in mind this wretched CETA). I refer to my recent letters on Izok and Gondor and possible exploitation of huge reserves of minerals from the impoverished Canadian territory of Nunavut. A port (to get these to the EU) would be built close to the Northwest Passage, which again implies that it will be ice free long enough each year to make all of this worthwhile.
          >
          > Finally, if we look at the comings and going of Canada's Prime Minister, we see that he often goes to the Arctic to be seen giving speeches and to be strutting about. He has done this since he won power in the 2006 elections. The question is why, given that few of Canada's previous holders of this office have even bothered with this huge, but virtually uninhabited area of the country. I think now we have our answer: money and trade. The EU has probably overplayed its hand in looking at the north AND global warming, and Mr. Harper knows it. If I am right about this knowledge of the EU and its apparent desperate attempt to use the ice free Arctic, then Mr. Harper can develop the northern portions of the North American continent to huge advantage for Canada.
          >
          > The big thing I am looking at today is the fact that "all of a sudden" the so far rather quiet attempts by various parties in the US and EU to establish an FTA between these two giant blocs (the two biggest in the world I read) have become something more. It seems that after the aforementioned Karel de Gucht had paid his respects to Canada's Prime Minister Stephen Harper, he was off to Washington to discuss something similar with some very influential White House types. I have no idea what he promised Mr. Harper to get the Canada/EU talks wound up in short order, but the question is what he told the Americans. I can legitimately ask this for after the visit, Mr. de Gucht was applauded by leaders in the EU and President Obama, in his annual State of the Union address, said that the time had come for such an agreement to be negotiated. The EU was, as may be imagined, ecstatic and in reading about this I could only find one moderately short article which
          > was against it. So, why is there so much interest by the EU is lining up Free Trade Agreements with Canada, Japan, and the USA in short order? The question, like everything else, is one of money.
          >
          > Gerry
          >
          > ******************************************************************************************
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Gerry Agnew
          It is a brilliant essay you have written Sheree, and I commend you for writing. Your first few sentences are spot on, but we are never going to see them
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 5, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            It is a brilliant essay you have written Sheree, and I commend you for writing. Your first few sentences are spot on, but we are never going to see them enacted. As long as traders and money men look only at the shortest of terms for "investment", they will not allow people to change the rules and risk "harming a good thing".

            Only when the current short term leads to a disastrous middle and long term (as it must) will people react with "we gotta do something". Then you will see your changes; far too late to do any good!

            Gerry

            ******************************************************


            ----- Original Message -----
            From: sheree137
            To: energyresources@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, March 03, 2013 4:12 PM
            Subject: Re: Fw: [energyresources] Update for February 25, 2013 (Newsletter - Currency Thoughts -3)



            Perhaps this relates to Myopia: corporate "vision" fettered by its legal imperative to return a profit for shareholders, regardless if it kills their progeny....
            Perhaps reform of US and/or multinational incorporation laws is an idea whose time is ripe at last. A corporation should, one would think, not be a danger to life, now or in the future.
            Why might this be an apt time for this idea?
            Now the media spin is the US has a "glut" of domestically extracted fossil fuels, and that the US should not "hoard" them, as if it is evil to hold onto them. Not so long ago, the justification for more US fossil fuel extraction was the need to provide for years of US use of fossil fuels. So, if the US exports future reserves now, how is that providing for future energy independence? Isn't it kicking the can down the road?
            The most prudent thing to do, from a national energy security perspective, would be for the US to LEAVE FOSSIL FUELS IN THE GROUND until thw US needs them. That, coincidentally, could help to lessen the prospect of some of the most disastrous effects of climate change.
            Why is the US tax structure providing incentives to fossil fuel companies that then turn around and profit by exporting US fuels? Is that not counterintuitive? How about removing the subsidies, so that fossil fuel prices are in line with some of the real costs (not mentioning the externalized costs, such as accelerated global warming, etc.)?
            I am an occasional lurker on this board, so perhaps y'all have roundly discussed this, but then again.... sometimes an idea needs traction, critical mass, a little push in the right direction.
            Maybe it's a realistic hope, not horror, that could ensue....

            Sheree Cammer
            New York State, US

            --- In energyresources@yahoogroups.com, Denis Frith wrote:
            >
            > Gerry discusses below how the powerful in global society are likely to respond to the developing global economic contraction. He discusses the impact of the conflicting monetary decisions. He discusses only how Myopia will be operating.
            >
            > Whilst this is happening, the Real world will be continuing as usual. Natural resources, including oil, will continue to irrevocably deplete. The wastes produced by industry will continue deleteriously impact on the environment, including changing the climate and disrupting the marine eco system while polluting land, sea, air and organisms, including people. The infrastructure of civilization, including the cities, will continue to demand some of the remaining natural resources for operation and maintenance, even as they irrevocably age.
            >
            > The Myopia world is an intangible world of human views governing decisions, good and bad. The tangible Real world obeys natural forces and does not recognize the wishes and desires of that invasive species, Homo sapiens.
            >
            > Denis Frith
            >
            >
            > ----- Forwarded Message -----
            > From: Gerry Agnew
            > To: energyresources@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Wednesday, 27 February 2013 8:23 AM
            > Subject: Re: [energyresources] Update for February 25, 2013 (Newsletter - Currency Thoughts -3)
            >
            >
            > Â
            > When Denis writes that "there are few signs of that wisdom emerging" he is absolutely correct. What is likely to happen is that there will be a terrible scramble for what wealth remains. We shall see currency debasement schemes to make local goods and products more attractive to would be buyers on global markets and so generate locally made jobs and the like. We are seeing some of this already with Japan's rather blatant attempts to reflate their economy and give their ultra-hardpressed domestic industries a break. The British are a bit more refined with all of this by buying up large quantities of Treasury securities from banks via Bank of England deposits into the banks in London (aka "money printing"). Today we see this taken one step further with an article in the Daily Mail about possibly introducing negative interest rates into the British economy.
            >
            > After this fails (as it will as not everyone can devalue their currency against every other currency) we shall see trade wars such as what we saw in the 1930s as everybody wants to export their goods and keep out competitors. Clearly, same logic, this cannot be done by everybody. It may be that this is the reason why the EU is so frantic to get some sort of trade agreement (FTA) with the US and clearly as quickly as possible. They have an excellent idea of what lies just around the corner. In short this is a dreadful mess awaiting!
            >
            > In having researched this sort of thing for most of my life, I can advise that we are looking at things going to get worse as more and more printed wealth seeks to find homes in a falling real market for good and services. Future generations will indeed wonder at the ignorance of a society which is doing what I see unfolding. It is a scramble with Devil take the hindmost. Grab all you can and show no care for the long term damage which is being done. This comment may also tend to explain why the world's majors are grabbing all of the oil resources that they can and are holding on like grim death. It is consistent (along with EU trade agreements) with a realisation that things will not continue as they are. Better have all of the "stuff" you can under lock and key before the first bread and jobs riots (think Greece here) start to make waves in the global press.
            >
            > It is not a pleasant picture!
            >
            > Gerry
            >
            > ************************************************************************************
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: Denis Frith
            > To: Google IPP Group
            > Cc: energyresources@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 5:50 PM
            > Subject: Fw: [energyresources] Update for February 25, 2013 (Newsletter - Currency Thoughts -3)
            >
            > As usual, Gerry follows the money in discussing global trade activities. There is no questioning his views on the decisions being made by the powerful in their quest to make more money. However, this is like a group of old people discussing their future plans without taking into account the obvious limitations. No doubt many will look to gain from what climate change is doing - until reality hits home. This view is understandable because there is nothing they can do to stop climate change and other deleterious aspects of what industrialization has done. But more understanding of tangible physical reality and less focusing on the false lead of intangible money flow could help to ease the inevitable powering down as natural material resources run out. However, there are few signs of that wisdom emerging so society is going to leave the legacy of the unsustainable process driven by money. Future generations will wonder at the ignorance of a society that
            > believed in the ability of consuming natural resources and devastating the environment without having to pay the price.
            >
            > Denis Frith
            >
            > ----- Forwarded Message -----
            > From: Gerry Agnew gaea@...>
            > To: Frank Holland frankholland3@...>; energyresources@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Tuesday, 26 February 2013 3:40 AM
            > Subject: [energyresources] Update for February 25, 2013 (Newsletter - Currency Thoughts -3)
            >
            > For my energy readers: This is the third in a five part series I have been writing for my newsletter on major events which could influence currency markets going forward. In this segment, I am looking at what the leaders of the EU and Canada are thinking about global warming. My conclusion is that all of them believe that this phenomenon is a done deal. How can one be so sure? We simply follow the money (as always) which never fails. What they are doing is allowing for this to happen (not that anything can be done at this stage) and then structuring their trade flows around this. In this way they acknowledge what is happening but are trying to maintain a degree of continuity to blunt the effects (perceived or real) on the minds of their citizens. Citizens with blunted minds are less likely to rebel is how I see it!
            >
            > Let's continue with FTA (EU here) from last week.
            >
            > However, that is not all the EU has been doing. They are looking to open an FTA with Japan (as a gateway to what we used to call The Orient), although if some sort of war involving that nation breaks out this may not be a good idea! Nevertheless, they are pushing this hard despite the fact that the raw economic numbers may not be that good. If you are scratching your head on this one, I would ask that you do some research from the excellent files of the German newspaper Der Spiegel over the last few months. In particular, I am referring to a study done about cutting off large amounts of time and distance from shipments between the EU and The Orient by using a de-glaciated Arctic (again, think global warming here). Suddenly, the economics of transit between Japan and the EU make a great deal of sense and the numbers being tossed around, publicly at any rate, are not quite as silly as they look. Follow the money! (As always!). It will not let you down and
            > it seems to me that the major powers in the US and EU know full well that global warming (to a decent extent anyhow) is now a done deal and as such economic advantage must be taken.
            >
            > Looking at Canada again, we see this global warming argument is now quite a reasonable bet. We can also see (again thanking Der Spiegel) studies have been done which show that with the fairly rapid retreat of the Arctic glaciers in recent decades, that the fabled Northwest Passage is now opening up and is probably going to be open to deep sea shipping sooner rather than later. Lots of distance shaved off by sending Asian goods through the Bering Strait and through Northern Canada I would have thought! Two more Canadian items for you to consider here (again, keeping in mind this wretched CETA). I refer to my recent letters on Izok and Gondor and possible exploitation of huge reserves of minerals from the impoverished Canadian territory of Nunavut. A port (to get these to the EU) would be built close to the Northwest Passage, which again implies that it will be ice free long enough each year to make all of this worthwhile.
            >
            > Finally, if we look at the comings and going of Canada's Prime Minister, we see that he often goes to the Arctic to be seen giving speeches and to be strutting about. He has done this since he won power in the 2006 elections. The question is why, given that few of Canada's previous holders of this office have even bothered with this huge, but virtually uninhabited area of the country. I think now we have our answer: money and trade. The EU has probably overplayed its hand in looking at the north AND global warming, and Mr. Harper knows it. If I am right about this knowledge of the EU and its apparent desperate attempt to use the ice free Arctic, then Mr. Harper can develop the northern portions of the North American continent to huge advantage for Canada.
            >
            > The big thing I am looking at today is the fact that "all of a sudden" the so far rather quiet attempts by various parties in the US and EU to establish an FTA between these two giant blocs (the two biggest in the world I read) have become something more. It seems that after the aforementioned Karel de Gucht had paid his respects to Canada's Prime Minister Stephen Harper, he was off to Washington to discuss something similar with some very influential White House types. I have no idea what he promised Mr. Harper to get the Canada/EU talks wound up in short order, but the question is what he told the Americans. I can legitimately ask this for after the visit, Mr. de Gucht was applauded by leaders in the EU and President Obama, in his annual State of the Union address, said that the time had come for such an agreement to be negotiated. The EU was, as may be imagined, ecstatic and in reading about this I could only find one moderately short article which
            > was against it. So, why is there so much interest by the EU is lining up Free Trade Agreements with Canada, Japan, and the USA in short order? The question, like everything else, is one of money.
            >
            > Gerry
            >
            > ******************************************************************************************
            >
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