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Re:Venison / venyson or everything I need in life I learned from Mother Goose

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  • Jason
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 1, 2008
      <"I have read somewhere - I do this alot, read something, remember
      the details, but can't remember where it was I read it - but I have
      read somewhere that there would be a pot sitting next to the fire
      all day, and throughout the day things would be added to the pot -
      meat, vegetables, herbs, etc and end up being the pottage at the end
      of the day - very much like a stew that we would make today.">

      Leo, I believe what you were referring to was Peas Porridge. A base
      of pea soup... with what ever anyone could get their hands on was
      added... eaten hot... allowed to sit over night.. eaten in the a.m.
      Just eaten... though I would conjecture that it was never allowed to
      get 9 days old... I'm sure it was either consumer by then or slopped
      to the pigs...

      "Peas porridge hot, Peas porridge cold, Peas porridge in the pot
      Nine days old. Some like it hot, Some like it cold, Some like it in
      the pot Nine days old"


      --- In Endewearde_cooks@yahoogroups.com, Leofwyn of Wytelseie
      <elamache@...> wrote:
      >
      > The interesting thought regarding medieval recipes is that there
      are probably thousands of recipes that weren't written down. Who is
      to say that some cook, somewhere didnt add some veggies to their
      stew.
      >
      > With this thinking I have made several "what could be medieval"
      foods. I just try to remember that some veggies weren't around
      Europe in the Middle Ages. The potato for example, although a very
      staple of our own recipes in modern times, are thought not to have
      been used during medieval times.
      >
      > So if faced with your situation Jason. I would do the following:
      do the recipe as it is written or at least as close to it as you
      dare. And then I would add things to it for flavor, carrots or
      parsnips are very medieval - well at least I have been told that
      purple carrots are medieval. Celery, onions, garlic, butter, even
      turnip....it would make your venison stew much more substantial. And
      if I tasted my creation and decided that it just wasn't what I would
      serve my beloved friends cause it tasted like...well I will let you
      put in your own explitive... then I, would add things to it that are
      not medieval at all just to make sure that it wasn't a waste of my 4
      lbs of venison, beef buillion, worchester, etc.   I have read
      somewhere - I do this alot, read something, remember the details,
      but can't remember where it was I read it - but I have read
      somewhere that there would be a pot sitting next to the fire all
      day, and throughout the day things would be
      > added to the pot - meat, vegetables, herbs, etc and end up being
      the pottage at the end of the day - very much like a stew that we
      would make today.
      >
      > Or perhaps the venison stew recipe that you share with us is meant
      to be venison as a main dish - meat own its own - you know?  And
      meant to be served with veggies and bread on the side.
      >
      > just some thoughts
      > Leo
      > aka Leofwyn of Wytleseie
      >
    • Leofwyn
      nope don t think so, cause I love pea soup, and if it were referring to that I would remember. ;) (and there is a funny story about pea soup in my history that
      Message 2 of 11 , Oct 1, 2008
        nope don't think so, cause I love pea soup, and if it were referring
        to that I would remember. ;) (and there is a funny story about pea
        soup in my history that I will have to tell you sometime)

        But much like the old Peas porridge in the rhyme, it was kept next to
        the fire all day, and simmered.....can you imagine the lovely smells
        that permeated the home?

        I actually think it was something that I was reading on an anglo-saxon
        history website or viking website. Cause I do that a significant
        amount of time too.


        Leo

        --- In Endewearde_cooks@yahoogroups.com, "Jason" <jbgood789@...> wrote:
        >
        > <"I have read somewhere - I do this alot, read something, remember
        > the details, but can't remember where it was I read it - but I have
        > read somewhere that there would be a pot sitting next to the fire
        > all day, and throughout the day things would be added to the pot -
        > meat, vegetables, herbs, etc and end up being the pottage at the end
        > of the day - very much like a stew that we would make today.">
        >
        > Leo, I believe what you were referring to was Peas Porridge. A base
        > of pea soup... with what ever anyone could get their hands on was
        > added... eaten hot... allowed to sit over night.. eaten in the a.m.
        > Just eaten... though I would conjecture that it was never allowed to
        > get 9 days old... I'm sure it was either consumer by then or slopped
        > to the pigs...
        >
        > "Peas porridge hot, Peas porridge cold, Peas porridge in the pot
        > Nine days old. Some like it hot, Some like it cold, Some like it in
        > the pot Nine days old"
        >
        >
        > --- In Endewearde_cooks@yahoogroups.com, Leofwyn of Wytelseie
        > <elamache@> wrote:
        > >
        > > The interesting thought regarding medieval recipes is that there
        > are probably thousands of recipes that weren't written down. Who is
        > to say that some cook, somewhere didnt add some veggies to their
        > stew.
        > >
        > > With this thinking I have made several "what could be medieval"
        > foods. I just try to remember that some veggies weren't around
        > Europe in the Middle Ages. The potato for example, although a very
        > staple of our own recipes in modern times, are thought not to have
        > been used during medieval times.
        > >
        > > So if faced with your situation Jason. I would do the following:
        > do the recipe as it is written or at least as close to it as you
        > dare. And then I would add things to it for flavor, carrots or
        > parsnips are very medieval - well at least I have been told that
        > purple carrots are medieval. Celery, onions, garlic, butter, even
        > turnip....it would make your venison stew much more substantial. And
        > if I tasted my creation and decided that it just wasn't what I would
        > serve my beloved friends cause it tasted like...well I will let you
        > put in your own explitive... then I, would add things to it that are
        > not medieval at all just to make sure that it wasn't a waste of my 4
        > lbs of venison, beef buillion, worchester, etc.   I have read
        > somewhere - I do this alot, read something, remember the details,
        > but can't remember where it was I read it - but I have read
        > somewhere that there would be a pot sitting next to the fire all
        > day, and throughout the day things would be
        > > added to the pot - meat, vegetables, herbs, etc and end up being
        > the pottage at the end of the day - very much like a stew that we
        > would make today.
        > >
        > > Or perhaps the venison stew recipe that you share with us is meant
        > to be venison as a main dish - meat own its own - you know?  And
        > meant to be served with veggies and bread on the side.
        > >
        > > just some thoughts
        > > Leo
        > > aka Leofwyn of Wytleseie
        > >
        >
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