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farthingales, bumrolls and hoods

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  • Cate
    I thought these were some interesting articles: Farthingales & Bumrolls http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/farthingales.html French Hoods
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 27, 2007
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    • Wendi
      Ah, bumrolls. I was hoping everyone was politely ignoring their existence. I know I was. Gwen.
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 28, 2007
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        Ah, bumrolls. I was hoping everyone was politely ignoring their
        existence. I know I was.

        Gwen.


        --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, "Cate" <kelley@...> wrote:
        >
        > I thought these were some interesting articles:
        > Farthingales & Bumrolls
        > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/farthingales.html
        > French Hoods
        > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/french_hood.html
        > and
        > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/french_hood/french_hoods.html
        > Costumer's Guide to Home Depot
        > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/homedepot.html
        > Research Page on this site
        > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/research.html
        > Cate
        >
      • Cate
        Well, you should read that article, then. It says that bumrolls were not necessarily really period...She suggests that the way the skirt was gathered gave the
        Message 3 of 11 , Dec 28, 2007
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          Well, you should read that article, then. It says that bumrolls were
          not necessarily really period...She suggests that the way the skirt
          was gathered gave the appearance of possibly having a bit more in the
          deriere, but no bumroll documented. Padding on the hips, yes, but no
          bumroll. Interesting. Her articles appear fairly well researched.
          Cate

          --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, "Wendi"
          <lobster_kelaguen@...> wrote:
          >
          > Ah, bumrolls. I was hoping everyone was politely ignoring their
          > existence. I know I was.
          >
          > Gwen.
          >
          >
          > --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, "Cate" <kelley@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I thought these were some interesting articles:
          > > Farthingales & Bumrolls
          > > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/farthingales.html
          > > French Hoods
          > > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/french_hood.html
          > > and
          > >
          http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/french_hood/french_hoods.html
          > > Costumer's Guide to Home Depot
          > > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/homedepot.html
          > > Research Page on this site
          > > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/research.html
          > > Cate
          > >
          >
        • freida smith
          I have two cents on this bumroll issue. since I m a large women and when wearing and making a skirt requires three times your waist this can add up to a lot of
          Message 4 of 11 , Dec 29, 2007
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            I have two cents on this bumroll issue. since I'm a large women and when wearing and making a skirt requires three times your waist this can add up to a lot of fabric and weight. the bumroll helps to hold up the skirt. I have had a skirt that kept sliding off the subject that it was suppose to cover. so dancing was out of the question.
            freida


            Cate <kelley@...> wrote:
            Well, you should read that article, then. It says that bumrolls were
            not necessarily really period...She suggests that the way the skirt
            was gathered gave the appearance of possibly having a bit more in the
            deriere, but no bumroll documented. Padding on the hips, yes, but no
            bumroll. Interesting. Her articles appear fairly well researched.
            Cate

            --- In EndeweardeTailor@ yahoogroups. com, "Wendi"
            <lobster_kelaguen@ ...> wrote:
            >
            > Ah, bumrolls. I was hoping everyone was politely ignoring their
            > existence. I know I was.
            >
            > Gwen.
            >
            >
            > --- In EndeweardeTailor@ yahoogroups. com, "Cate" <kelley@> wrote:
            > >
            > > I thought these were some interesting articles:
            > > Farthingales & Bumrolls
            > > http://modehistoriq ue.com/elizabeth an/farthingales. html
            > > French Hoods
            > > http://modehistoriq ue.com/elizabeth an/french_ hood.html
            > > and
            > >
            http://modehistoriq ue.com/elizabeth an/french_ hood/french_ hoods.html
            > > Costumer's Guide to Home Depot
            > > http://modehistoriq ue.com/elizabeth an/homedepot. html
            > > Research Page on this site
            > > http://modehistoriq ue.com/elizabeth an/research. html
            > > Cate
            > >
            >



            Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.

          • L T
            I ll chime in from a fencing perspective about skirts and movement if you aren t wearing a hoop skirt (farthingale) or using a bumroll to fluff out the skirts.
            Message 5 of 11 , Dec 29, 2007
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              I'll chime in from a fencing perspective about skirts
              and movement if you aren't wearing a hoop skirt
              (farthingale) or using a bumroll to fluff out the
              skirts.

              Although so far I have preferred *not* to fence in
              skirts some of the comments I've read on other lists
              where skirts are popular with the fencing ladies
              indicate you want the fabric to have a little bit of
              weight, like a twill or denim weight. That way when
              you move the skirt moves too, and more importantly
              moves out of the way of your leg and foot. Very
              lightweight materials are pretty, but by themselves
              are so light they can tangle into your legs as you
              twist and move quickly.

              If you are planning to wear a gown for dancing and
              don't want a bumroll or farthingale, it may be worth
              considering lining it with another light material to
              add weight or using a band of lightweight horsehair
              (notions section at JoAnns) or some type of weighting
              to the hem to help prevent it from creeping up.
              Sometimes it's just static cling; sometimes it just
              doesn't move away from you very well when you move.

              The grey knickers I made for my husband are a very
              lightweight suiting wool. I lined them with a cotton
              muslin which gave them just the right amount of drape
              to provide "poof!" and a bit of weight for movement.
              The next generation of grey knickers will also be
              lined (the first pair shrank just enough to be a bit
              short so I found replacement fabric in the same
              material).

              I think some types of clothing need at least one test
              drive before they get completely away from your sewing
              area and into your scadian wardrobe.

              Bryn

              --- freida smith <fis1965@...> wrote:

              > I have two cents on this bumroll issue. since I'm a
              > large women and when wearing and making a skirt
              > requires three times your waist this can add up to a
              > lot of fabric and weight. the bumroll helps to hold
              > up the skirt. I have had a skirt that kept sliding
              > off the subject that it was suppose to cover. so
              > dancing was out of the question.
              > freida
              >
              >
              > Cate <kelley@...> wrote:
              > Well, you should read that article,
              > then. It says that bumrolls were
              > not necessarily really period...She suggests that
              > the way the skirt
              > was gathered gave the appearance of possibly having
              > a bit more in the
              > deriere, but no bumroll documented. Padding on the
              > hips, yes, but no
              > bumroll. Interesting. Her articles appear fairly
              > well researched.
              > Cate
              >
              > --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, "Wendi"
              > <lobster_kelaguen@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > Ah, bumrolls. I was hoping everyone was politely
              > ignoring their
              > > existence. I know I was.
              > >
              > > Gwen.
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, "Cate"
              > <kelley@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > I thought these were some interesting articles:
              > > > Farthingales & Bumrolls
              > > >
              >
              http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/farthingales.html
              > > > French Hoods
              > > >
              >
              http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/french_hood.html
              > > > and
              > > >
              >
              >
              http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/french_hood/french_hoods.html
              > > > Costumer's Guide to Home Depot
              > > >
              > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/homedepot.html
              > > > Research Page on this site
              > > >
              > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/research.html
              > > > Cate
              > > >
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ---------------------------------
              > Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.



              ____________________________________________________________________________________
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            • Cate
              Yes, I think that was mentioned in the article as well. Good point. Cate ... and when wearing and making a skirt requires three times your waist this can add
              Message 6 of 11 , Dec 29, 2007
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                Yes, I think that was mentioned in the article as well. Good point.
                Cate

                --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, freida smith <fis1965@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > I have two cents on this bumroll issue. since I'm a large women
                and when wearing and making a skirt requires three times your waist
                this can add up to a lot of fabric and weight. the bumroll helps to
                hold up the skirt. I have had a skirt that kept sliding off the
                subject that it was suppose to cover. so dancing was out of the
                question.
                > freida
                >
                >
                > Cate <kelley@...> wrote: Well, you
                should read that article, then. It says that bumrolls were
                > not necessarily really period...She suggests that the way the
                skirt
                > was gathered gave the appearance of possibly having a bit more in
                the
                > deriere, but no bumroll documented. Padding on the hips, yes,
                but no
                > bumroll. Interesting. Her articles appear fairly well researched.
                > Cate
                >
                > --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, "Wendi"
                > <lobster_kelaguen@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Ah, bumrolls. I was hoping everyone was politely ignoring their
                > > existence. I know I was.
                > >
                > > Gwen.
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, "Cate" <kelley@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > I thought these were some interesting articles:
                > > > Farthingales & Bumrolls
                > > > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/farthingales.html
                > > > French Hoods
                > > > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/french_hood.html
                > > > and
                > > >
                >
                http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/french_hood/french_hoods.html
                > > > Costumer's Guide to Home Depot
                > > > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/homedepot.html
                > > > Research Page on this site
                > > > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/research.html
                > > > Cate
                > > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ---------------------------------
                > Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.
                >
              • Cate
                I ve not had trouble with skirts creeping up yet, perhaps too long, but that was more due to hem. You are right, though, test runs are helpful, though usually
                Message 7 of 11 , Dec 29, 2007
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                  I've not had trouble with skirts creeping up yet, perhaps too long,
                  but that was more due to hem. You are right, though, test runs are
                  helpful, though usually those happen at events for me.
                  Cate

                  --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, L T <ladybrynmillar@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > I'll chime in from a fencing perspective about skirts
                  > and movement if you aren't wearing a hoop skirt
                  > (farthingale) or using a bumroll to fluff out the
                  > skirts.
                  >
                  > Although so far I have preferred *not* to fence in
                  > skirts some of the comments I've read on other lists
                  > where skirts are popular with the fencing ladies
                  > indicate you want the fabric to have a little bit of
                  > weight, like a twill or denim weight. That way when
                  > you move the skirt moves too, and more importantly
                  > moves out of the way of your leg and foot. Very
                  > lightweight materials are pretty, but by themselves
                  > are so light they can tangle into your legs as you
                  > twist and move quickly.
                  >
                  > If you are planning to wear a gown for dancing and
                  > don't want a bumroll or farthingale, it may be worth
                  > considering lining it with another light material to
                  > add weight or using a band of lightweight horsehair
                  > (notions section at JoAnns) or some type of weighting
                  > to the hem to help prevent it from creeping up.
                  > Sometimes it's just static cling; sometimes it just
                  > doesn't move away from you very well when you move.
                  >
                  > The grey knickers I made for my husband are a very
                  > lightweight suiting wool. I lined them with a cotton
                  > muslin which gave them just the right amount of drape
                  > to provide "poof!" and a bit of weight for movement.
                  > The next generation of grey knickers will also be
                  > lined (the first pair shrank just enough to be a bit
                  > short so I found replacement fabric in the same
                  > material).
                  >
                  > I think some types of clothing need at least one test
                  > drive before they get completely away from your sewing
                  > area and into your scadian wardrobe.
                  >
                  > Bryn
                  >
                  > --- freida smith <fis1965@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > > I have two cents on this bumroll issue. since I'm a
                  > > large women and when wearing and making a skirt
                  > > requires three times your waist this can add up to a
                  > > lot of fabric and weight. the bumroll helps to hold
                  > > up the skirt. I have had a skirt that kept sliding
                  > > off the subject that it was suppose to cover. so
                  > > dancing was out of the question.
                  > > freida
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Cate <kelley@...> wrote:
                  > > Well, you should read that article,
                  > > then. It says that bumrolls were
                  > > not necessarily really period...She suggests that
                  > > the way the skirt
                  > > was gathered gave the appearance of possibly having
                  > > a bit more in the
                  > > deriere, but no bumroll documented. Padding on the
                  > > hips, yes, but no
                  > > bumroll. Interesting. Her articles appear fairly
                  > > well researched.
                  > > Cate
                  > >
                  > > --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, "Wendi"
                  > > <lobster_kelaguen@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Ah, bumrolls. I was hoping everyone was politely
                  > > ignoring their
                  > > > existence. I know I was.
                  > > >
                  > > > Gwen.
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, "Cate"
                  > > <kelley@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > I thought these were some interesting articles:
                  > > > > Farthingales & Bumrolls
                  > > > >
                  > >
                  > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/farthingales.html
                  > > > > French Hoods
                  > > > >
                  > >
                  > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/french_hood.html
                  > > > > and
                  > > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/french_hood/french_hoods.html
                  > > > > Costumer's Guide to Home Depot
                  > > > >
                  > > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/homedepot.html
                  > > > > Research Page on this site
                  > > > >
                  > > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/research.html
                  > > > > Cate
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > ---------------------------------
                  > > Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  _____________________________________________________________________
                  _______________
                  > Looking for last minute shopping deals?
                  > Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.
                  http://tools.search.yahoo.com/newsearch/category.php?
                  category=shopping
                  >
                • freida
                  did you know that Margie Kempe a female writer that lived in the 14th century wrote about punishing herself for her lust by wearing a shirt made from horsehair
                  Message 8 of 11 , Dec 29, 2007
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                    did you know that Margie Kempe a female writer that lived in the 14th
                    century wrote about punishing herself for her lust by wearing a shirt
                    made from horsehair under her clothing so her husband wouldn't see it.
                    she felt that she was full of sin and felt that if she could over come
                    the pleasure of the flesh she would feel closer to god.
                    the women ran her father's brewery and warehouse. the women had a
                    fine head for business but she had issues with depression. because of
                    this she fell in love with god that became twisted, or did she use it
                    to control the issue of sex with her husband. she has some great
                    writings. I had to write a paper on medieval women and had a great
                    time researching.
                    just a thought
                    freida


                    --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, L T <ladybrynmillar@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I'll chime in from a fencing perspective about skirts
                    > and movement if you aren't wearing a hoop skirt
                    > (farthingale) or using a bumroll to fluff out the
                    > skirts.
                    >
                    > Although so far I have preferred *not* to fence in
                    > skirts some of the comments I've read on other lists
                    > where skirts are popular with the fencing ladies
                    > indicate you want the fabric to have a little bit of
                    > weight, like a twill or denim weight. That way when
                    > you move the skirt moves too, and more importantly
                    > moves out of the way of your leg and foot. Very
                    > lightweight materials are pretty, but by themselves
                    > are so light they can tangle into your legs as you
                    > twist and move quickly.
                    >
                    > If you are planning to wear a gown for dancing and
                    > don't want a bumroll or farthingale, it may be worth
                    > considering lining it with another light material to
                    > add weight or using a band of lightweight horsehair
                    > (notions section at JoAnns) or some type of weighting
                    > to the hem to help prevent it from creeping up.
                    > Sometimes it's just static cling; sometimes it just
                    > doesn't move away from you very well when you move.
                    >
                    > The grey knickers I made for my husband are a very
                    > lightweight suiting wool. I lined them with a cotton
                    > muslin which gave them just the right amount of drape
                    > to provide "poof!" and a bit of weight for movement.
                    > The next generation of grey knickers will also be
                    > lined (the first pair shrank just enough to be a bit
                    > short so I found replacement fabric in the same
                    > material).
                    >
                    > I think some types of clothing need at least one test
                    > drive before they get completely away from your sewing
                    > area and into your scadian wardrobe.
                    >
                    > Bryn
                    >
                    > --- freida smith <fis1965@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > > I have two cents on this bumroll issue. since I'm a
                    > > large women and when wearing and making a skirt
                    > > requires three times your waist this can add up to a
                    > > lot of fabric and weight. the bumroll helps to hold
                    > > up the skirt. I have had a skirt that kept sliding
                    > > off the subject that it was suppose to cover. so
                    > > dancing was out of the question.
                    > > freida
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Cate <kelley@...> wrote:
                    > > Well, you should read that article,
                    > > then. It says that bumrolls were
                    > > not necessarily really period...She suggests that
                    > > the way the skirt
                    > > was gathered gave the appearance of possibly having
                    > > a bit more in the
                    > > deriere, but no bumroll documented. Padding on the
                    > > hips, yes, but no
                    > > bumroll. Interesting. Her articles appear fairly
                    > > well researched.
                    > > Cate
                    > >
                    > > --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, "Wendi"
                    > > <lobster_kelaguen@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > Ah, bumrolls. I was hoping everyone was politely
                    > > ignoring their
                    > > > existence. I know I was.
                    > > >
                    > > > Gwen.
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, "Cate"
                    > > <kelley@> wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > I thought these were some interesting articles:
                    > > > > Farthingales & Bumrolls
                    > > > >
                    > >
                    > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/farthingales.html
                    > > > > French Hoods
                    > > > >
                    > >
                    > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/french_hood.html
                    > > > > and
                    > > > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/french_hood/french_hoods.html
                    > > > > Costumer's Guide to Home Depot
                    > > > >
                    > > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/homedepot.html
                    > > > > Research Page on this site
                    > > > >
                    > > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/research.html
                    > > > > Cate
                    > > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > ---------------------------------
                    > > Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    ____________________________________________________________________________________
                    > Looking for last minute shopping deals?
                    > Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.
                    http://tools.search.yahoo.com/newsearch/category.php?category=shopping
                    >
                  • Cate
                    I sure hope this corset that I m making fits - I don t think I want to make another one. If it doesn t fit - I m taking up dieting... Cate ... 14th ... shirt
                    Message 9 of 11 , Dec 30, 2007
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                      I sure hope this corset that I'm making fits - I don't think I want
                      to make another one. If it doesn't fit - I'm taking up dieting...
                      Cate


                      --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, "freida" <fis1965@...>
                      wrote:
                      >
                      > did you know that Margie Kempe a female writer that lived in the
                      14th
                      > century wrote about punishing herself for her lust by wearing a
                      shirt
                      > made from horsehair under her clothing so her husband wouldn't see
                      it.
                      > she felt that she was full of sin and felt that if she could over
                      come
                      > the pleasure of the flesh she would feel closer to god.
                      > the women ran her father's brewery and warehouse. the women had a
                      > fine head for business but she had issues with depression. because
                      of
                      > this she fell in love with god that became twisted, or did she use
                      it
                      > to control the issue of sex with her husband. she has some great
                      > writings. I had to write a paper on medieval women and had a
                      great
                      > time researching.
                      > just a thought
                      > freida
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, L T <ladybrynmillar@>
                      wrote:
                      > >
                      > > I'll chime in from a fencing perspective about skirts
                      > > and movement if you aren't wearing a hoop skirt
                      > > (farthingale) or using a bumroll to fluff out the
                      > > skirts.
                      > >
                      > > Although so far I have preferred *not* to fence in
                      > > skirts some of the comments I've read on other lists
                      > > where skirts are popular with the fencing ladies
                      > > indicate you want the fabric to have a little bit of
                      > > weight, like a twill or denim weight. That way when
                      > > you move the skirt moves too, and more importantly
                      > > moves out of the way of your leg and foot. Very
                      > > lightweight materials are pretty, but by themselves
                      > > are so light they can tangle into your legs as you
                      > > twist and move quickly.
                      > >
                      > > If you are planning to wear a gown for dancing and
                      > > don't want a bumroll or farthingale, it may be worth
                      > > considering lining it with another light material to
                      > > add weight or using a band of lightweight horsehair
                      > > (notions section at JoAnns) or some type of weighting
                      > > to the hem to help prevent it from creeping up.
                      > > Sometimes it's just static cling; sometimes it just
                      > > doesn't move away from you very well when you move.
                      > >
                      > > The grey knickers I made for my husband are a very
                      > > lightweight suiting wool. I lined them with a cotton
                      > > muslin which gave them just the right amount of drape
                      > > to provide "poof!" and a bit of weight for movement.
                      > > The next generation of grey knickers will also be
                      > > lined (the first pair shrank just enough to be a bit
                      > > short so I found replacement fabric in the same
                      > > material).
                      > >
                      > > I think some types of clothing need at least one test
                      > > drive before they get completely away from your sewing
                      > > area and into your scadian wardrobe.
                      > >
                      > > Bryn
                      > >
                      > > --- freida smith <fis1965@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > > I have two cents on this bumroll issue. since I'm a
                      > > > large women and when wearing and making a skirt
                      > > > requires three times your waist this can add up to a
                      > > > lot of fabric and weight. the bumroll helps to hold
                      > > > up the skirt. I have had a skirt that kept sliding
                      > > > off the subject that it was suppose to cover. so
                      > > > dancing was out of the question.
                      > > > freida
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > Cate <kelley@> wrote:
                      > > > Well, you should read that article,
                      > > > then. It says that bumrolls were
                      > > > not necessarily really period...She suggests that
                      > > > the way the skirt
                      > > > was gathered gave the appearance of possibly having
                      > > > a bit more in the
                      > > > deriere, but no bumroll documented. Padding on the
                      > > > hips, yes, but no
                      > > > bumroll. Interesting. Her articles appear fairly
                      > > > well researched.
                      > > > Cate
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, "Wendi"
                      > > > <lobster_kelaguen@> wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Ah, bumrolls. I was hoping everyone was politely
                      > > > ignoring their
                      > > > > existence. I know I was.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Gwen.
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > > --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, "Cate"
                      > > > <kelley@> wrote:
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > I thought these were some interesting articles:
                      > > > > > Farthingales & Bumrolls
                      > > > > >
                      > > >
                      > > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/farthingales.html
                      > > > > > French Hoods
                      > > > > >
                      > > >
                      > > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/french_hood.html
                      > > > > > and
                      > > > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/french_hood/french_hoods.html
                      > > > > > Costumer's Guide to Home Depot
                      > > > > >
                      > > > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/homedepot.html
                      > > > > > Research Page on this site
                      > > > > >
                      > > > http://modehistorique.com/elizabethan/research.html
                      > > > > > Cate
                      > > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > ---------------------------------
                      > > > Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                      _____________________________________________________________________
                      _______________
                      > > Looking for last minute shopping deals?
                      > > Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.
                      > http://tools.search.yahoo.com/newsearch/category.php?
                      category=shopping
                      > >
                      >
                    • L T
                      One of our local scadians (Lady Amee) who works as a professional costumer and who received her maunche award (excellence in arts) once told me that a corset
                      Message 10 of 11 , Dec 30, 2007
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                        One of our local scadians (Lady Amee) who works as a
                        professional costumer and who received her maunche
                        award (excellence in arts) once told me that a corset
                        is supposed to be 2 inches smaller than your body in
                        order to fit properly when laced up and closed. Or at
                        least that is what I recall because I found it quite
                        surprising.

                        Are you making front or back lacing? Or both front and
                        back lacing in the corset?

                        Bryn

                        --- Cate <kelley@...> wrote:

                        > I sure hope this corset that I'm making fits - I
                        > don't think I want
                        > to make another one. If it doesn't fit - I'm taking
                        > up dieting...
                        > Cate
                        >


                        ____________________________________________________________________________________
                        Looking for last minute shopping deals?
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                      • Cate
                        That might make sense as I read earlier that Victorian corsets were 4 inches smaller and they were much tighter than period corsets. I think what I was
                        Message 11 of 11 , Dec 30, 2007
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                          That might make sense as I read earlier that Victorian corsets were
                          4 inches smaller and they were much tighter than "period" corsets.
                          I think what I was reading said that corsets in Tudor/Italian Ren
                          period was more for the "stiff" effect than for shaping the waist.
                          I'm finding that making one is very tedious. Chemises are so much
                          simpler (and quicker). That's my next project. Perhaps I will have
                          something new to wear to Birka.
                          Cate

                          --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, L T <ladybrynmillar@...>
                          wrote:
                          >
                          > One of our local scadians (Lady Amee) who works as a
                          > professional costumer and who received her maunche
                          > award (excellence in arts) once told me that a corset
                          > is supposed to be 2 inches smaller than your body in
                          > order to fit properly when laced up and closed. Or at
                          > least that is what I recall because I found it quite
                          > surprising.
                          >
                          > Are you making front or back lacing? Or both front and
                          > back lacing in the corset?
                          >
                          > Bryn
                          >
                          > --- Cate <kelley@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > > I sure hope this corset that I'm making fits - I
                          > > don't think I want
                          > > to make another one. If it doesn't fit - I'm taking
                          > > up dieting...
                          > > Cate
                          > >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          _____________________________________________________________________
                          _______________
                          > Looking for last minute shopping deals?
                          > Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.
                          http://tools.search.yahoo.com/newsearch/category.php?
                          category=shopping
                          >
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